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15 of the Weirdest Street Names Across the U.S.

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There are some towns around the country where you can take a physical trip down Memory Lane, pay a visit to Sesame Street, hang out on Easy Street, or giggle at Butt Road. Here are a few other wacky, weird street names that have made it onto the map in various cities:

1. Tupac Lane

A Las Vegas subdivision features a street named for Tupac—though which Tupac is unclear. It was developed in 1990, when Tupac Shakur was still a backup dancer. Other notable Tupacs include several Inca rulers and a former state senator from Michigan. 

2. Frying Pan Road

The D.C. suburb of Herndon, Virginia has featured a community named Frying Pan since at least the 1700s. In the 1890s, the community changed its name to Floris, but the road remains. 

3. This, That, and The Other Streets

Street namers near Porters Lake in Nova Scotia apparently ran out of ideas, because three connecting streets are called “This Street,” “That Street,” and “The Other Street.” Hopefully no one has to give too many directions around there. 

4. Roast Meat Hill Road

Killingworth, Connecticut pays tribute to a warm dinner—or burning livestock. No one's really sure. 

5. 100 Year Party Court

Who wouldn’t want to buy a house on this street in Longmont, Colorado? The neighborhood is full of whimsical roads, including Half Measures Drive, Confidence Drive, and Tempted Ways Drive. 

6. Zzyzx Road

This road in California’s Mojave Desert shares a name with the town it leads to, as well as a genus of sand wasp. Several songs and a few movies have been named after the area. Zyzzyx Road, a thriller starring Katherine Heigl, made just $30 at the box office. 

7. Chicken Dinner Road 

The origin of this Idaho road’s name lies with a resident who lobbied the governor (who was a friend) to improve the road outside her house. Laura Lamb was known for her chicken, and now no one can drive down the street without being reminded of dinner. 

8. Error Place

On a map, this tiny route in Cincinnati looks like someone began to make a cross street connecting two avenues then decided better of it and gave up. It’s actually a staircase going up a hill. 

9. Bad Route Road

Taking a trip down this residential Montana street may not be as bad of an idea as it sounds. It’s likely named after Bad Route Creek, an offshoot of the Yellowstone River. 

10. Duh Drive

Several graduate student apartment buildings at Lehigh University in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania are located on Duh Drive. Because living there’s a no-brainer. 

11. Puddin' Ridge Road

Residents of Moyock, North Carolina might have named this street for how muddy it became after a rain. Trying to traverse the thoroughfare before it was paved could be like wading through pudding, according to local legend.

12. Anyhow Lane

This tree-lined residential street in Gansevoort, New York is just like, whatever. 

13. Linger Longer Road

It sounds like either Southern hospitality or a threat to drivers with a bad sense of direction, but Linger Longer is the informal nickname of the Reynolds Plantation resort in Greensboro, Georgia.

14. Chicken Gristle Road

Granbury, Texas knows how to make a location sound enticing. Chicken Gristle Road is a short detour off Power Plant Court. 

15. Pillow Talk Court

There are a lot of secrets being shared on this little dead-end in the Las Vegas suburbs, no doubt. 

Additional Sources: Freak Streets

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Delightful Photo Series Celebrates Britain’s Municipal Trash Cans
Harry Trimble
Harry Trimble

Not all trash cans are alike. In the UK, few know this better than Harry Trimble, the brains behind #govbins, a photo project that aims to catalog all the trash can designs used by local governments across Britain.

Trimble, a 29-year-old designer based in South London, began the series in 2016, when he noticed the variation in trash can design across the cities he visited in the UK. While most bins are similar sizes and shapes, cities make trash cans their own with unique graphics and unusual colors. He started to photograph the cans he happened to see day-to-day, but the project soon morphed beyond that. Now, he tries to photograph at least one new bin a week.

A bright blue trash can reads ‘Knowsley Council: Recycle for Knowsley.’
Knowsley Village, England

“I got impatient,” Trimble says in an email to Mental Floss. “Now there’s increasingly more little detours and day trips” to track down new bin designs, he says, “which my friends, family and workmates patiently let me drag them on.” He has even pulled over on the road just to capture a new bin he spotted.

So far, he’s found cans that are blue, green, brown, black, gray, maroon, purple, and red. Some are only one color, while others feature lids of a different shade than the body of the can. Some look very modern, with minimalist logos and city website addresses, Trimble describes, “while others look all stately with coats of arms and crests of mythical creatures.”

A black trash can features an 'H' logo.
Hertsmere, England

A blue trash can reads ‘South Ribble Borough Council: Forward with South Ribble.’
South Ribble, England

A green trash can with a crest reads ‘Trafford Council: Food and Garden Waste Only.’
Trafford, Greater Manchester, England

Trimble began putting his images up online in 2017, and recently started an Instagram to show off his finds.

For now, he’s “more than managing” his one-can-a-week goal. See the whole series at govbins.uk.

All images by Harry Trimble

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Why a Train Full of New York City Poop Was Stranded in Alabama for Two Months
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Residents of Parrish, Alabama probably aren't too fond of New Yorkers right now. That’s because the town is currently home to a full trainload of poop courtesy of the Big Apple, as Bloomberg reports. Some 200 shipping containers of treated sewage have been stuck in Parrish for more than two months while the town takes landfill operators to court.

New York City doesn't keep its own sewage sludge to itself, and it hasn't for decades. In the 1980s, New York City was dumping its "biosolids"—the solids left over from sewage treatment, i.e., your poop—into the Atlantic Ocean, where it settled on the bottom of the sea floor in a thick film stretching over 80 square nautical miles. When the government banned the practice of dumping waste straight into the ocean, the city had to get creative, finding a way to get rid of the 1200 tons of biosolids produced there every day.

Enter the poop train. As a 2013 Radiolab episode taught us (we highly recommend you listen for yourself), treated sludge was eventually shipped out to other states to use as fertilizer in the 1990s. After farmers in Colorado began noticing better growth and fewer pests in the fields they grew with New York City's finest sewer sludge, growers in other states began clamoring to take the big-city poop by the train-full, too. That tide has turned, though, and now no one wants the city's poop. Because of the cost of running the program, the train to Colorado stopped in 2010.

Now, biosolids are instead shipped to landfills upstate and in places like Georgia, Ohio, and Pennsylvania, according to The Wall Street Journal. And Alabama. For more than a year, the Big Sky landfill near Parrish has been accepting New York City biosolids, and the locals who have to deal with trainloads of rotting waste aren’t happy.

Normally, the sludge would be loaded onto trucks and then driven the last stretch to get to the landfill. But Parrish and its nearby neighbor of West Jefferson aren't interested in playing host to those messy poop transfers anymore. As the two towns take the landfill operators to court over it, the trains are stuck where they are, next to Parrish's Little League baseball fields. The trainload of sludge is blocked from either being sent to the landfill or back to New York City. While the city has stopped shipping more waste to Big Sky, it essentially said "no takebacks" regarding what they've already sent south. Short of a legal decision, that poop isn't moving.

Needless to say, the residents of Parrish would really, really like to resolve this before summer hits.

Update: Parrish residents can officially breathe easy. The last of the sludge has now been removed from the town, and Big Sky has ended its operation there, according to a Facebook post from Mayor Heather Hall. The containers that remain have been emptied of their smelly cargo and will be removed sometime before Friday, April 20.

[h/t Bloomberg]

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