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14 Hot and Juicy Facts About Nathan’s Famous

Even if you’ve never been to the sprawling stand on Coney Island, you still know about Nathan’s Famous hot dogs—whether from the grocery store or the company’s restaurants, or from watching people willingly stuff their faces full of them every year on national television. The company is a bona fide empire these days, but success didn’t come easily. Here are a few facts about the company’s rise from single stand to iconic brand. 

1. IT ALL STARTED WITH FIVE-CENT HOT DOGS.

In 1912, Nathan Handwerker immigrated from Poland to the U.S. and took a job in the kitchen at Feltman’s restaurant on Coney Island. Convinced he could serve up a better hot dog than the ones Feltman’s made, Handwerker took out a $300 loan and set up a stand serving five-cent dogs—half the price of Feltman’s.

2. NATHAN USED A RECIPE FROM THE OLD COUNTRY.

To make his hot dogs stand out from the competition, Nathan seasoned them using a secret blend of spices handed down from his wife Ida’s grandmother. The result: great success. By 1920, when the subway was extended out to Coney Island, Nathan’s Famous was selling 75,000 hot dogs each weekend.

3. NATHAN HAD AN INGENIOUS METHOD FOR PROMOTING FOOD SAFETY.

To convince customers his hot dogs weren’t a health hazard, Handwerker handed out flyers offering free samples to hospital workers, who showed up wearing their protective smocks. Because if doctors are eating there it must be safe, right?

4. PARKING WAS INSANE, BUT NOBODY EVER GOT A TICKET.

When Nathan’s Famous was hopping, cars would often be double- and triple-parked along Surf Avenue. But nobody ever got a ticket because Nathan had local policemen on the dole. According to the documentary Famous Nathan (filmed by Nathan’s grandson, Lloyd), Handwerker paid officers $2 a day to give people a break, but to step in if things got rowdy.

5. EXPANSION TOOK 50 YEARS TO HAPPEN.

Nathan’s original stand grew and grew, until it took up almost the entire block. But it wasn’t until his son, Murray, took over the business in 1968 that Nathan’s Famous began to extend the brand. A shrewd businessman, Murray established a chain of restaurants along with the packaged hot dog business. Today, there are more than 300 Nathan’s Famous restaurants, and the hot dogs appear in supermarkets in all 50 states.

6. CRIMINALS AND CELEBRITIES ALIKE WERE BIG FANS.

Frequent patrons to the Coney Island stand included Al Capone and Cary Grant (presumably not together), and President Franklin D. Roosevelt, who managed to serve Nathan's hot dogs to the King and Queen of England in 1939 as well as Winston Churchill and Joseph Stalin. Modern-day stars have continued the love. Barbra Streisand, for one, had them shipped to London for a dinner party.

7. IT USED TO OWN KENNY ROGERS ROASTERS.

Nathan’s Famous bought the chicken joint in 1998 after it went bankrupt (Kenny’s still sad about that). Ten years later, Nathan’s sold it to a Malaysian franchiser, and now the chain is enjoying a profitable second life in Asia.

8. WALTER MATTHAU REQUESTED THEM AT HIS FUNERAL.

Although he died in California, the Grumpy Old Men star stayed loyal to his New York roots, requesting Nathan’s hot dogs by name in his will. There were also fortune cookies, celebrating his Oscar-winning turn in Billy Wilder’s The Fortune Cookie.

9. THE COMPANY ALMOST WENT UNDER IN THE '80S.

After soaring through the '70s, when the company stock hit a high of $41 per share, the market for hot dogs grew stale, and Nathan’s stock dwindled to $1 in 1981. Despite calls to further diversify the menu, Murray Handwerker stuck with the original hot dog, and slowly the company improved. In 1986, it sold its 20 stores and packaged products business to investment firm Equicorp for $19 million. 

10. A FAMILY BUSINESS MEANS THERE'S FAMILY DRAMA.

Nathan’s two sons, Murray and Sol, didn’t see eye to eye on how to run the business. So in 1963, Sol broke away from Nathan’s Famous and started his own hot dog shop, Snacktime, on 34th Street in Manhattan. It closed in 1977—three years after Nathan passed away. "My father could not handle the conflict between Murray and myself," Sol tells his son Lloyd in Famous Nathan.

11. IT REOPENED AFTER HURRICANE SANDY IN TRUE NEW YORK STYLE.

Less than six months after Hurricane Sandy flooded the Coney Island location, Nathan’s Famous was back in business, and better than ever. The multimillion-dollar renovation allowed the company to add some upscale flourishes, including an oyster bar and a selection of beer and wine.

12. THE HOT DOG EATING CONTEST BEGAN AS A TEST OF PATRIOTISM.

According to legend (and the company), the first ever hot dog eating contest took place on July 4, 1916 between four men arguing over who was the most patriotic. They set to scarfing down Nathan’s hot dogs, with the winner, James Mullen, eating 13 hot dogs in 12 minutes. Which, while impressive, is nothing compared to what today’s professional eaters can cram down.

13. THE CURRENT HOT DOG EATING CHAMP IS A ONE-MAN DYNASTY.


Getty Images

Since 2007, Joey Chestnut has won the Mustard Yellow Belt, the top prize at Nathan's hot dog eating competition, a whopping nine times. The Californian holds the world hot-dog eating record—he consumed 73.5 Nathan’s Famous hot dogs and buns in 10 minutes. Ranked the No. 1 competitive eater in the world, Chestnut holds a slew of nauseating 10-minute records, including nearly 13 pounds of deep-fried asparagus, 47 grilled cheese sandwiches, 25.5 pounds of poutine, and a whole turkey.

14. BUSINESS IS BOOMING THESE DAYS.

Nathan’s $1-a-share days are well in the past, with sales and revenue up year over year. The company has stayed in the high-margin businesses of franchising and brand licensing, and its iconic hot dogs are sold in restaurants and stadiums around the country. It’s also gone international, with locations in Russia, Mexico and Malaysia. How do you say "pass the mustard" in Malay?

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Something is rotten in the city of Miami. A murder has been committed—and nobody knows who’s behind the dastardly crime. The police are likely no match for the killer, so it’s up to the Golden Girls characters to combine their wits (over cheesecake, of course) to crack the case. But they can’t do it without your help.

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