Best Friends Build Own Private Neighborhood to Be Together Forever

For many groups of faithful friends, adulthood means accepting that logistics are often the biggest obstacle to maintaining relationships. As hard as it is to get the gang together for dinner when everyone lives in the same city, it becomes a Herculean (or Sisyphean) task once the winds of change have scattered everyone to lands afar. Rather than succumb to the inevitable growing apart, four close-knit couples in Texas came up with a clever way to live together while maintaining their independence. They've built themselves four tiny houses all in a row, each within a stone’s throw of the next.

Because nothing says friends forever like signing a deed together, eight great pals living in the Austin area purchased ten acres of land outside the city limits, near the Llano River, for what they dubbed the “Llano Exit Strategy.” With a plot of earth to collectively call their own, the environmentally minded landowners enlisted the services of architect Matt Garcia to design four identical residential structures, one for each of the families. In keeping with the pragmatic minimalism of the “tiny house” movement, the homes comprise a mere 350 square feet apiece, with one bedroom, one bathroom, and one living room.

Where the friends’ extremely private community breaks from tiny house tradition is the existence of a fifth building: a big 1500-square-foot cabin with a full kitchen and additional social space for the neighbor-friends to come together as they please—think of it as a ground-level tree house, or a college residence hall lounge with nicer furniture. There are two dishwashers, presumably to avoid fighting over anyone leaving their silverware out too long, a porch, picnic tables, and even six bunk beds to accommodate lucky guests.

It’s not hard to see why the couples chose the Llano River as the site of their ideal idyll. They “had been hunting for a quiet escape from the ever-growing buzz of Austin, a place to ride their bikes, reconnect with nature and recharge,” and the riverfront location checks all those boxes. They’ve made sure to respect their natural surroundings by working with the arid local climate, rather than against it: the homes’ sloped butterfly-style roofs catch rainwater for reuse around the compound, while metal siding and good insulation both reduce heat from the glaring summer sun while preserving indoor warmth during cooler months.

The couples haven’t yet moved to their shared property full-time, escaping their busy city lives mostly on holidays and long weekends, but they do plan to retire there. What a way to grow old together.

San Francisco's Full House Home Is for Sale

The exterior of the San Francisco home that was used in the opening of Full House.
The exterior of the San Francisco home that was used in the opening of Full House.
The Agency

In the opening credits for the sitcom Full House, fans knew to expect a shot of the Tanners in a car, a view of San Francisco's Golden Gate Bridge, and a quick glimpse of the red door of the family's home.

Fans have been visiting the real location of the San Francisco home used to shoot that iconic opening's exterior for years to take photos (and annoy the neighbors), but now someone has the opportunity to do more than lurk outside: TopTenRealEstateDeals.com reports that the home is currently on the market for $5.99 million.

The interior of the 'Full House' house
The Agency

The 3728-square-foot Victorian home, designed by Charles Lewis Hinkel and constructed in 1883, is located in San Francisco's desirable Lower Pacific Heights neighborhood—about a mile away from the famous "Painted Ladies" houses that are also featured in the show's opening credits.

The interior of the 'Full House' house
The Agency

Listed by The Agency, the home's interior looks much different than it appears on either the original show or the recent Fuller House sequel series (both of which were filmed in a studio). And it has recently undergone a major renovation, courtesy of Full House creator Jeff Franklin, who purchased the home for approximately $4 million in 2016 and went to work on updating it.

The kitchen of the 'Full House' house
The Agency

Instead of the open living room with a checked pattern couch and staircase, starchitect Richard Landry redesigned the home to be "sleek with soaring ceilings, skylights, and a masterful floor plan that allows for exceptional light and movement throughout," according to The Agency's property listing. "Sophistication and luxury combine to give you an ethereal residence that offers comfort, class, and opulent finishes."

The interior of the 'Full House' house
The Agency

The exterior looks a lot different than it did on the show, too—and features a less flashy door.

The exterior of the San Francisco home that was used in the opening of 'Full House'
The Agency

If you still want the home despite the differences from the Tanners' abode, you can view the full listing here—and check out the full interior in the video below.

Updated for 2019.

Notre-Dame's Rooftop Bees Survived the Historic Fire

Dan Kitwood/Getty Images
Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

Following the fire that tore through Notre-Dame in Paris on April 15, fire officials shared that the church's bell towers, stone facade, and many of its precious artifacts had escaped destruction. But the building's centuries-old features weren't the only things threatened by the blaze: The three beehives on the roof of the cathedral were also at risk. Now, CNN reports that the bees of Notre-Dame and their homes have survived the historic fire.

Notre-Dame's beehives are a relatively recent addition to the site: They were placed on the first-floor rooftop over the sacristy and beneath one of the rose windows in 2013. Nicolas Geant, the church's beekeeper, has been in charge of caring for the roughly 180,000 Buckfast bees that make honey used to feed the hungry.

Most people weren't thinking of bees as they watched Notre-Dame burn, but when the fire was put out, Geant immediately searched drone photographs for the hives. While the cathedral's wooden roof and spire were gone, the beehives remained, though there was no way of knowing if the bees had survived without having someone check in person. Geant has since talked to Notre-Dame's spokesperson and learned that bees are flying in and out of the hives, which means that at least some of them are alive.

Because the beehives were kept in a section 100 feet below the main roof where the fire was blazing, they didn't meet the same fate as the church's other wooden structures. The hives were likely polluted with smoke, but this wouldn't have hurt the insects: Bees don't have lungs, so smoke calms them rather than suffocates them.

Notre-Dame's bees may have survived to buzz another day, but some parts of the building weren't so lucky. France has vowed to rebuild it, with over $1 billion donated toward the cause so far.

[h/t CNN]

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