JULES ANTOINE (1863-1948) ATTR. via The Romantic Agony
JULES ANTOINE (1863-1948) ATTR. via The Romantic Agony

Does This Photo Feature the Notoriously Camera-Shy Vincent van Gogh?

JULES ANTOINE (1863-1948) ATTR. via The Romantic Agony
JULES ANTOINE (1863-1948) ATTR. via The Romantic Agony

He may have painted dozens of self-portraits, but Dutch painter Vincent van Gogh was not a fan of being photographed. Few photographic images of the artist exist, especially as an adult. A Brussels-based auction house claims to have gotten ahold of a new one, discovered in the papers of a bookseller who was active in the Paris literary scene in the 1920s.

The photograph in question shows van Gogh (if it is, in fact, him) drinking with fellow artists Paul Gauguin, Emile Bernard, and Arnold Koning, with painter/politician Félix Jobbé-Duval. The French actor André Antoine stands in the middle.

It’s well known that van Gogh was friends with Gauguin and Bernard, both of whom he met in Paris and later exchanged letters with. He and Gauguin lived and worked together for two months at an artists’ colony in Arles, France in 1888. The two had a falling out shortly before van Gogh lost his ear—which, according to one theory posited by two German art historians, occurred during a fight with Gauguin. (The traditional story is that van Gogh cut it off himself.)

The man reported to be van Gogh. Image Credit: Shaunacy Ferro, Jules Antoine (1863-1948) attr. via The Romantic Agony

The auction house puts the estimated value of the image at €120,000 ($134,277). However, not all experts agree that the photograph is of van Gogh, and it did not sell at an auction over the weekend. The photo expert at the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam maintains that it doesn’t even look like the artist. Furthermore, van Gogh flatly hated photography, and typically refused to be photographed, making it unlikely that he would have sat still for this one. Nor did he mention the gathering of artists in any of his letters.

This is not the only controversial image of a van Gogh lookalike. In 2004, a forensic scientist authenticated a photograph found by artist Tom Stanford of a man who bears a striking resemblance to van Gogh, but the Van Gogh Museum rejected the conclusion.

[h/t: Colossal]

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YouTube/Great Big Story
See the Secret Paintings Hidden in Gilded Books
YouTube/Great Big Story
YouTube/Great Big Story

The art of vanishing fore-edge painting—hiding delicate images on the front edges of gilded books—dates back to about 1660. Today, British artist Martin Frost is the last remaining commercial fore-edge painter in the world. He works primarily on antique books, crafting scenes from nature, domestic life, mythology, and Harry Potter. Great Big Story recently caught up with him in his studio to learn more about his disappearing art. Learn more in the video below.

nextArticle.image_alt|e
Mathew Tucciarone
Candytopia, the Interactive Art Installation Made of Sweet Treats, Is Coming to New York City
Mathew Tucciarone
Mathew Tucciarone

A colorful exhibition is sharing some eye candy—and actual candy—with visitors. The sweet art pop-up, called Candytopia, is heading to New York City this summer following successful stints in Los Angeles and Santa Monica, Gothamist reports.

Candytopia feels a little like Willy Wonka’s chocolate room. More than a dozen rooms with psychedelic backdrops will be on view, as well as candy-inspired interpretations of famous artworks such as Mona Lisa and The Thinker. The installation is the brainchild of Jackie Sorkin, the star of TLC’s Candy Queen.

Many of the art installations are made from actual candy, but unlike Wonka’s lickable wallpaper, visitors will have to keep their hands and tongues to themselves. Instead, guests will be given samples of various sweet treats like gummies, chocolates, and “nostalgic favorites.”

Forbes named Candytopia one of the best pop-up museums to visit in 2018. New York City seems the perfect place for the exhibit, having formerly hosted other food-inspired pop-ups like the Museum of Pizza and the Museum of Ice Cream.

Candytopia will debut in New York City on August 15 at Penn Plaza at 145 West 32nd Street. Tickets must be purchased in advance, and they can be ordered on Candytopia’s website. Private events and birthday parties can also be arranged.

Keep scrolling to see some more installations from Candytopia.

A wing of the Candytopia exhibit
Mathew Tucciarone

An Egyptian-inspired statue made of candy
Mathew Tucciarone

A candy version of the Mona Lisa
Mathew Tucciarone

A shark statue
Mathew Tucciarone

[h/t Gothamist]

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