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Abandoned Chinese Village Now Overgrown With Ivy

Just 50 years ago, the Houtou Wan Village—one of the 394 islands known as the Shengsi Islands in China's Yangtze River—was a thriving fishing town. But after the adjacent bay could no longer accommodate the increasing number of vessels, the village was gradually abandoned over the past half a century as residents moved elsewhere.

For a few decades now, almost no one has lived in Houtou Wan, leaving nature to take over. The result is a verdant relic that looks more like a secret garden than an empty ghost town. Ivy covers nearly every inch of what were once homes and businesses, creating a lush scene of dense foliage.

All photos courtesy Jane Qing

[h/t My Modern Met]

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Department of the Interior. Office of Indian Affairs. Fort Totten Agency. 1903-1947, National Archives and Records Administration
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History
Help the National Archives Tag Photos of Life on Native American Reservations
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Department of the Interior. Office of Indian Affairs. Fort Totten Agency. 1903-1947, National Archives and Records Administration

The National Archives needs your help. The federal agency is looking for volunteer archivists to make its collections of photography from life on Native American reservations more accessible via online searches.

Volunteers will tag these historic photos of reservation life, taken in the early- and mid-20th century by photographers from federal agencies like the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Citizen archivists can generate searchable tags by identifying the people, places, and activities shown in the images. It helps if you have a bit of insider knowledge and can recognize individuals or the locations where the images were shot, but non-experts can lend a hand by labeling what's happening in the photos.

Corn dries in front of a log cabin.
Department of the Interior. Office of Indian Affairs. Fort Totten Agency. 1903-1947, National Archives and Records Administration

The collections span everything from images of 4-H participants from 1933 to photos of locations you can no longer see, such as parts of the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation in North Dakota that were flooded by the construction of a dam in the late 1940s, causing the tribes who lived there to lose 94 percent of their agricultural land. Tagging these photos makes these vital documentations of reservation life more accessible to the public and to scholars.

Previously, the National Archives has solicited regular folks for other digitization projects, including transcribing declassified documents that included records from UFO sightings and tagging a congressional cookbook.

To participate, start with the National Archives' email newsletter, which contains some ideas for which collections to start on. You can register as a "citizen archivist" on archives.gov.

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Firebox
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travel
Never Lose Sight of Your Luggage Again by Covering It With Your Own Face
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Firebox

Say goodbye to the colored tape, bright luggage tags, and ostentatious ribbons you've been using to spot your baggage from afar at the airport. And say hello to … you.

As Travel + Leisure reports, you can now emblazon your luggage with a giant photo of your own face. Because nothing says “hands off my stuff” like an oversized portrait of yourself soaring down the conveyor belt. You’re sure to make a few friends around town as you head to your hotel, too.

Made by Firebox, the Head Case is a stretchy spandex cover for your suitcase that is printed on both sides with the high-res photo of your choosing. The cover buckles in place, and there are holes to allow you to access all the handles on the sides of your bag. It comes in three different sizes for suitcases between 18 inches and 32 inches tall, ranging from $26 to $39 each.

Note: You can also get a pillow that looks like your face. Or hanging air fresheners. Or creepy masks. And of course, it doesn't necessarily have to be your face you send in. We don't need to spell out the prank possibilities for you, do we?

[h/t Travel + Leisure]

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