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Abandoned Chinese Village Now Overgrown With Ivy

Just 50 years ago, the Houtou Wan Village—one of the 394 islands known as the Shengsi Islands in China's Yangtze River—was a thriving fishing town. But after the adjacent bay could no longer accommodate the increasing number of vessels, the village was gradually abandoned over the past half a century as residents moved elsewhere.

For a few decades now, almost no one has lived in Houtou Wan, leaving nature to take over. The result is a verdant relic that looks more like a secret garden than an empty ghost town. Ivy covers nearly every inch of what were once homes and businesses, creating a lush scene of dense foliage.

All photos courtesy Jane Qing

[h/t My Modern Met]

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David Nadlinger
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science
This Photo of a Single Atom Won a Science Photography Top Prize
David Nadlinger
David Nadlinger

While you've been busy finding just the right Instagram filter for your cat, a University of Oxford graduate student has been occupied with visualizing a single atom and capturing it in a still frame. And the remarkable feat recently earned an Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council photography award. Why? It was taken with a conventional camera, and the atom can be seen with the naked eye.

Take a look:

A close-up of a single atom in an ion trap
David Nadlinger

That tiny dot in between the two parallel metal electrodes is a strontium atom suspended by electric fields in an ion trap. It’s visible because the photographer, Ph.D. candidate David Nadlinger, projected blue violet light into a vacuum chamber. The atom absorbed and reflected the light, allowing Nadlinger to snap a photo in the split instant the atom was viewable. The space between the two points is just 0.08 of an inch.

Nadlinger dubbed the image "Single Atom in an Ion Trap" and took the Council’s top award. In a statement, he expressed enthusiasm that other people are now able to see what his work in quantum computing looks like.

[h/t Newsweek]

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iStock
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Animals
London Photographer Captures the Dogs of the World in Their Own Habitats
iStock
iStock

When snapping pictures, some travel photographers prefer to focus on people walking the streets. Highlighting the local residents can help ground a place in reality, but humans aren’t the only subjects worth capturing. For his project "Dogs, Dogs, Dogs", London-based photographer Alan Schaller documents the canines that he finds in all corners of the globe.

According to My Modern Met, Schaller started out photographing people he met on his travels. The high-contrast, black-and-white look of his work has earned him widespread recognition. For his latest project, he has chosen to showcase dogs in the same style.

Schaller described dogs to My Modern Met as “consistently friendly, unpredictable, and amusing” compared to humans. When he sees a dog he wants to photograph, he will first ask the owner's permission, then bend down to the pet’s level to gain its trust. He has photographed dogs in Norway, England, India, Thailand, Turkey, and plenty of places in between, and the personalities of the dogs he captures are just as diverse as their homes. You can check out his photography below and follow Schaller on Instagram to see more of his work.

[h/t My Modern Met]

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