Why Does the Queen Have Two Birthdays?

CHRIS JACKSON, AFP/Getty Images
CHRIS JACKSON, AFP/Getty Images

On April 21, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II will turn 92 years old. To mark the occasion, there are usually a series of gun salutes around London: a 41 gun salute in Hyde Park, a 21 gun salute in Windsor Great Park, and a 62 gun salute at the Tower of London. For the most part, the monarch celebrates her big day privately. But on June 9, 2018, Her Majesty will parade through London as part of an opulent birthday celebration known as Trooping the Colour.

Queen Elizabeth, like many British monarchs before her, has two birthdays: the actual anniversary of the day she was born, and a separate day that is labeled her "official" birthday (usually the second Saturday in June). Why? Because April 21 is usually too cold for a proper parade.

The tradition started in 1748, with King George II, who had the misfortune of being born in chilly November. Rather than have his subjects risk catching colds, he combined his birthday celebration with the Trooping the Colour.

The parade itself had been part of British culture for almost a century by that time. At first it was strictly a military event, at which regiments displayed their flags—or "colours"—so that soldiers could familiarize themselves. But George was known as a formidable general after having led troops at the Battle of Dettingen in 1743, so the military celebration seemed a fitting occasion onto which to graft his warm-weather birthday. Edward VII, who also had a November birthday, was the first to standardize the June Trooping the Colour and launched a tradition of a monarchical review of the troops that drew crowds of onlookers.

Even now, the date of the "official" birthday varies year to year. For the first seven years of her reign, Elizabeth II held her official birthday on a Thursday but has since switched over to Saturdays. And while the date is tied to the Trooping the Colour in the UK, Commonwealth nations around the world have their own criteria, which generally involve recognizing it as a public holiday.

Australia started recognizing an official birthday back in 1788, and all the provinces (save one) observe the Queen's Birthday on the second Monday in June, with Western Australia holding its celebrations on the last Monday of September or the first Monday of October.

In Canada, the official birthday has been set to align with the actual birth date of Queen Victoria—May 24, 1819—since 1845, and as such they celebrate so-called Victoria Day on May 24 or the Monday before.

In New Zealand, it's the first Monday in June, and in the Falkland Islands the actual day of the Queen's birth is celebrated publicly.

All in all, just another reason it's great to be Queen.

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Why Does Wine Only Stain Some People's Teeth?

iStock.com/yula
iStock.com/yula

Maybe getting red wine stains on your teeth would be less embarrassing if it was a universal experience. But as you may have noticed after splitting a bottle of cabernet between friends, wine doesn't have the same tinting effects on everyone. Whether vino leaves your teeth untouched or makes you look like you've been chewing on a purple Sharpie, you can give credit to your genes and hygiene habits.

A mix of components make red wine the perfect drink for staining teeth. It's acidic, which means it degrades your enamel at the microscopic level, making the surface of your teeth less even and more likely to catch pigments. Red wine contains anthocyanins, the pigment that gives wine (and the mouths of some wine-drinkers) a dusky red color, as well as tannins, which encourage those pigments to bind to your teeth. White wine also has acid and tannins (though a much lower level of tannins than reds), but without the dark pigments, drinking white wine alone won't stain your teeth.

Some wine drinkers are better equipped to handle this than others, such as those gifted with healthy, strong enamel. Enamel is the layer of minerals that protects your teeth, and it's the strongest substance in the human body. It's what makes teeth resistant to acidic foods and stains, and how much of it you have is often a product of factors beyond your control, like age and genetics. (Enamel doesn't grow back, so it wears down over a lifetime of use.)

But even if your genes are working against you, that doesn't necessarily mean you have to choose between your favorite drink and a presentable smile. You can prevent wine mouth, or at least make it look less noticeable, by practicing good oral hygiene. Teeth covered in plaque are more likely to stain, and brushing your teeth at least twice a day and flossing daily helps reduce plaque while keeping your enamel strong.

If you plan on ordering red wine at the bar you're heading to, brush your teeth beforehand: This will get rid of a lot of the plaque that would otherwise act as a magnet for pigments. Because brushing can scratch enamel in the same way that acid does, this should only be done about 30 minutes before you have your first sip of wine, and not in between glasses. Eating while you drink can help as well. By munching on a protein, you can create a sort of stain-blocking barrier for your teeth—just in case you needed an excuse to order a cheese plate with your pinot.

What you choose to drink also factors into how stained your teeth may or may not be by the end of the night. Though wines like chardonnay don't stain your teeth, they do make them more vulnerable to dark pigments, so never start off drinking white wine and move on to red. Dark wines tend to leave the darkest stains. If you absolutely must have a glass of red wine with dinner, opt for a pinot noir over a cabernet (or something lighter-bodied, in wine-speak).

What Happened to the Physical Copy of Martin Luther King's 'I Have a Dream' Speech?

AFP, Getty Images
AFP, Getty Images

On August 28, 1963, Martin Luther King Jr. stood on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial and gave a speech for the ages, delivering the oratorical masterpiece "I Have a Dream" to nearly 250,000 people.

When he was done, King stepped away from the podium, folded his speech, and found himself standing in front of George Raveling, a former Villanova basketball player who, along with his friend Warren Wilson, had been asked to provide extra security around Dr. King while he was speaking. "We were both tall, gangly guys," Raveling told TIME in 2003. "We didn't know what we were doing but we certainly made for a good appearance."

Moved by the speech, Raveling saw the folded papers in King’s hands and asked if he could have them. King gave the young volunteer the speech without hesitation, and that was that.

“At no time do I remember thinking, ‘Wow, we got this historic document,’” Raveling told Sports Illustrated in 2015. Not realizing he was holding what would become an important piece of history in his hands, Raveling went home and stuck the three sheets of paper into a Harry Truman biography for safekeeping. They sat there for nearly two decades while Raveling developed an impressive career coaching NCAA men’s basketball.

In 1984, he had recently taken over as the head coach at the University of Iowa and was chatting with Bob Denney of the Cedar Rapids Gazette when Denney brought up the March on Washington. That's when Raveling dropped the bomb: “You know, I’ve got a copy of that speech," he said, and dug it out of the Truman book. After writing an article about Raveling's connection, the reporter had the speech professionally framed for the coach.

Though he displayed the framed speech in his house for a few years, Raveling began to realize the value of the piece and moved it to a bank vault in Los Angeles. Though he has received offers for King’s speech—one collector wanted to purchase the speech for $3 million in 2014—Raveling has turned them all down. He has been in talks with various museums and universities and hopes to put the speech on display in the future, but for now, he cherishes having it in his possession.

“That to me is something I’ll always be able to look back and say I was there,” Raveling said in the original Cedar Rapids Gazette article. “And not only out there in that arena of people, but to be within touching distance of him. That’s like when you’re 80 or 90 years old you can look back and say ‘I was in touching distance of Abraham Lincoln when he made the Gettysburg Address.’"

“I have no idea why I even asked him for the speech,” Raveling, now CEO of Coaching for Success, has said. “But I’m sure glad that I did.”

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