CLOSE
Getty Images
Getty Images

15 Times Stars Took Method Acting Too Far

Getty Images
Getty Images

For some actors, just looking the part isn't always enough. Here are several who took method acting to the extreme.

1. Adrien Brody // The Pianist (2002)

Brody dropped 30 pounds in order to portray Holocaust survivor Wladyslaw Szpilman in The Pianist, and actually learned to play piano, practicing four hours a day. After that, most actors would have called it a day. Instead, Brody decided he needed to feel as lost as Szpilman did after he was forced out of the life he knew: "I gave up my apartment, I sold my car, I disconnected the phones, and I left," Brody told the BBC. "I took two bags and my keyboard and moved to Europe." (Not surprisingly, his frustrated girlfriend at the time dumped him.) His sacrifices paid off in the form of a 2003 Oscar for Best Actor.

2. The cast of One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975)


The cast of the Best Picture-winning film, including Jack Nicholson, lived at the psychiatric ward where the movie was shot, interacting with real patients and undergoing group therapy sessions—some of which director Milos Forman filmed without their knowledge.

3. Sylvester Stallone // Rocky IV (1985)


While filming Rocky IV, Stallone asked co-star Dolph Lundgren—a.k.a. Ivan Drago—to try and "really" knock him out. "Bad idea," Stallone later recalled. "Later that night my blood pressure goes up to 260, I go to the hospital, they put me in an emergency jet, and fly me back to America. Next thing I know I’m in intensive care for five days with nuns walking around. He hit my heart so hard that it banged against my ribs and started to swell, and that usually happens in car accidents. So I was hit by a truck!”

4. Christian Bale // The Machinist (2004)


Getty Images


The six-foot-tall Bale famously dropped 60 pounds to play a severe insomniac in this psychological thriller—and, within six weeks, gained it all back for his role in Batman Begins. His Machinist co-star Michael Ironside has suggested that Bale might not have gone to such extreme lengths had screenwriter Scott Kosar taken the time to alter his script. "The writer is only about five-foot-six, and he put his own weights in," Ironside said. "And then Chris did the film and Chris said, ‘No, don’t change the weights. I want to see if I make them.’ ... So those weights he writes on the bathroom wall in the film are his actual weights in the film."

5. Billy Bob Thornton // Sling Blade (1996)


Thornton depended on an unusual—and painful—method to nail his character Karl's signature shuffle: The actor placed crushed glass inside his shoes, forcing him to limp around. He earned an Oscar nomination for the role.

6. Val Kilmer // The Doors (1991)


To score the part of Jim Morrison in Oliver Stone's The Doors, Kilmer spent thousands of dollars producing an eight-minute music video of him singing the rocker's songs. Once he booked the gig, Kilmer memorized 50 Doors songs, and even (allegedly) wore Morrison's clothes and frequented his favorite Hollywood hangouts. The actor also spent hundreds of hours interrogating Paul Rothchild, a producer for the iconic rock band and a consultant on the film. At the end of production, Rothchild said that Kilmer "knows Jim Morrison better than Jim ever knew himself. He's nailed—to the extent that The Doors themselves had difficulty telling whether it was Val singing or Jim singing. Early on, I'd bring them into a recording studio and I randomly switched Val and Jim and they guessed wrong 80 percent of the time.''

7. Nicolas Cage // Birdy (1984)


In order to physically feel the pain his Vietnam vet character might have, Cage had a few teeth pulled—without anesthesia. He also spent five weeks with his face wrapped in bandages. "The reactions on the street were brutal," Cage told The Telegraph. "Men and women laughing, kids staring. And when I took the bandages off, my skin was all infected because of acne and ingrowing hairs."

8. Robert De Niro // Taxi Driver (1976)


De Niro actually got his cab driver's license while prepping for his role in the Martin Scorsese classic. The Oscar winner worked 12-hour shifts, and would reportedly pick up passengers around New York City during breaks from shooting.

9. Halle Berry // Jungle Fever (1991)


Berry was set on getting inside the head of the drug addict she played in Spike Lee's 1991 film. The actress visited a crack den as part of her research, and didn't bathe for two weeks. ''It's true,'' she told Wendy Williams in 2012. ''Ask Sam Jackson! He had to get a whiff of it.''

10. Jamie Dornan // The Fall (2013)

Dornan, who plays a serial killer on the chilling Netflix series, wanted to experience the thrill of the chase. So, "On the tube … I, like, followed a woman off the train one day to see what it felt like to pursue someone like that," Dornan has said. Keeping his distance, the actor followed her for several blocks.

11. & 12. Shia LaBeouf //The Necessary Death of Charlie Countryman (2013) & Fury (2014)


Getty Images


When LaBeouf heard that his Charlie Countryman character dropped acid during a scene, he wanted to make his big-screen portrayal of the act as realistic as possible. In order to prep, LaBeouf took LSD, filmed his trip, and sent the video off to co-star Evan Rachel Wood for feedback.

The day after he got his role as a WWII soldier in Fury, "I joined the U.S. National Guard," LaBeouf told Dazed magazine. "I was baptized—accepted Christ in my heart—tattooed my surrender and became a chaplain’s assistant to Captain Yates for the 41st infantry. I spent a month living on a forward operating base. Then I linked up with my cast and went to Fort Irwin. I pulled my tooth out, knifed my face up, and spent days watching horses die. I didn’t bathe for four months.”

13., 14. & 15. Daniel Day-Lewis // The Crucible (1996), Gangs of New York (2002) & Lincoln (2012)


Getty Images


For his role in The Crucible, Day-Lewis committed to living on the set, which was a replica of a colonial village—meaning there was no electricity or running water. He also built his own 17th-century house, using only the tools America's settlers would have had available to them at the time.

The three-time Oscar-winner's devotion to his craft nearly cost him his health on Scorsese's Gangs of New York, when Day-Lewis refused to wear a modern-day winter coat on set during filming and caught pneumonia. (To portray Bill the Butcher, he also flew in a British butcher to teach him how to cut up carcasses. No big deal.)

For Lincoln, he refused to break character—period. Day-Lewis walked, talked, and even texted as Honest Abe, according to his co-star Sally Field. "I never met him. Never. I met him as Mr. Lincoln. He met me as Molly, as he called her," Field said. "After I got the role, there were seven months before we began to shoot and he would text me all the time, in character. I would have to then answer back in the language of the time, which was really hard to figure out, but great fun."

nextArticle.image_alt|e
Hulton Archive, Getty Images
arrow
entertainment
7 Things You Might Not Know About Audrey Hepburn
Hulton Archive, Getty Images
Hulton Archive, Getty Images

Though she’ll always be known as the little-black-dress-wearing big-screen incarnation of Holly Golightly from Breakfast at Tiffany’s, there’s probably a lot you don’t know about Audrey Hepburn, who passed away in Switzerland on January 20, 1993.

1. HER FIRST ROLE WAS IN AN EDUCATIONAL FILM.

Though 1948’s Dutch in Seven Lessons is classified as a “documentary” on IMDb, it’s really more of an educational travel film, in which Hepburn appears as an airline attendant. If you don’t speak Dutch, it might not make a whole lot of sense to you, but you can watch it above anyway.

2. GREGORY PECK WAS AFRAID SHE’D MAKE HIM LOOK LIKE A JERK.

Hepburn was an unknown actress when she was handed the starring role of Princess Ann opposite Gregory Peck in 1953’s Roman Holiday. As such, Peck was going to be the only star listed, with Hepburn relegated to a smaller font and an “introducing” credit. But Peck insisted, “You've got to change that because she'll be a big star and I'll look like a big jerk.” Hepburn ended up winning her first and only Oscar for the role (Peck wasn’t even nominated).

3. SHE’S AN EGOT.

In 1954, the same year she won the Oscar for Roman Holiday, Hepburn accepted a Tony Award for her title role in Ondine on Broadway. Hepburn is one of only 12 EGOTs, meaning that she has won all of the four major creative awards: an Emmy, Grammy, Oscar, and Tony. Unfortunately, the honor came to Hepburn posthumously; her 1994 Grammy for the children’s album Audrey Hepburn’s Enchanted Tales and her 1993 Emmy for Gardens of the World with Audrey Hepburn were both awarded following her passing in early 1993.

4. TRUMAN CAPOTE HATED HER AS HOLLY GOLIGHTLY.

Blake Edwards’s Breakfast at Tiffany’s may be one of the most iconic films in Hollywood history, but it’s a miracle that the film ever got made at all. Particularly if you listened to Truman Capote, who wrote the novella upon which it was based, and saw only one actress in the lead: Marilyn Monroe. When asked what he thought was wrong with the film, which downplayed the more tawdry aspects of the fact that Ms. Golightly makes her living as a call girl (Hepburn had told the producers, “I can’t play a hooker”), Capote replied, “Oh, God, just everything. It was the most miscast film I’ve ever seen. It made me want to throw up.”

5. HOLLY GOLIGHTLY’S LITTLE BLACK DRESS SOLD FOR NEARLY $1 MILLION.

Audrey Hepburn in 'Breakfast at Tiffany's'
Keystone Features, Getty Images

In 2006, Christie’s auctioned off the iconic Givenchy-designed little black dress that Hepburn wore in Breakfast at Tiffany’s for a whopping $923,187 (pre-auction numbers estimated that it would go for between $98,800 and $138,320). It was a record-setting amount at the time, until Marilyn Monroe’s white “subway dress” from The Seven Year Itch sold for $5.6 million in 2006.

6. SHE SANG “HAPPY BIRTHDAY” TO JFK IN 1963.

One year after Marilyn Monroe’s sultry birthday serenade to John F. Kennedy in 1962, Hepburn paid a musical tribute to the President at a private party in 1963, on what would be his final birthday.

7. THERE’S A RARE TULIP NAMED AFTER HER.

Photo of Audrey Hepburn
Hulton Archive, Getty Images

In 1990, a rare white tulip hybrid was named after the actress and humanitarian, and dedicated to her at her family’s former estate in Holland.

nextArticle.image_alt|e
iStock
arrow
entertainment
Why the Film You're Watching on HBO Might Not Be the Whole Movie
iStock
iStock

In the days before widescreen televisions, most of the movies you watched on VHS or on cable looked a little different than their big-screen versions. The sides of the image had to be cropped out so that you could watch a movie made for a rectangular screen on the small screen. Today, those little black bars on the top and bottom of the screen that allow you to watch the same movie scaled to any shape of screen are everywhere. But it turns out, cropping for aspect ratios is alive and well—on HBO, as YouTube film vlogger Patrick Willems explains.

In his latest video, which we spotted on Digg, Willems explains why aspect ratios matter, and how the commonly used aspect ratios can fundamentally change a movie.

Most old-school televisions have 4:3 aspect ratios, meaning movies had to be significantly cropped to fit wide-screen films on the small screen. Now, most computers and televisions use 16:9 aspect ratios, which is approximately the same as the one used for movies, typically 1.85:1, so many movies expand to fit TV screens perfectly. The catch: Some Hollywood movies are shot with even wider angles to show even more of an image at once. And even though viewers are familiar with the sight of those black bars, it seems the streaming sites are determined to limit their use, even for movies that don’t fit on a normal screen. As a result, you may only be seeing the central part of the image, not the whole thing. You could be missing characters, action, and landscape that’s happening on the far sides of the screen.

Since 1993, the Motion Picture Association of America has mandated that any film that’s been altered in a way that changes the original vision of its creators—say, to edit out swear words, adjust the run time, or to make it fit a certain screen—run with a disclaimer that says as much. That’s why before movies run on TV, they usually show a note that says something like “This film has been modified from its original version. It has been formatted to fit this screen.” But this doesn’t seem to apply to streaming.

In 2013, Netflix was accused of cropping films, too, showing wide-angle movies to fit the standard 16:9 screen instead of running the original version with black bars. The streaming giant claimed it was a mistake due to distributors sending them the cropped version, and those films would be replaced with the originals. However, as of 2015, users were still complaining of the problem. According to Willems, it’s a problem that still plagues not just HBO, but Starz and Hulu, too, and there isn’t any clear rationale for it other than that perhaps people don’t like looking at black bars. But frankly, that seems better than seeing a version of a film that the director never intended.

You can get all the details in the video below:

[h/t Digg]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios