15 Campy Facts About Wet Hot American Summer

Universal Pictures Home Entertainment
Universal Pictures Home Entertainment

You might be able to quote 2001's Wet Hot American Summer word for word, but even the most diehard fans of Coop, McKinley, and the rest of the Camp Firewood crew probably don't know these 15 "gournal"-worthy facts about the original movie's making—just as your favorite camp counselors get ready to reunite for Netflix's new series, Wet Hot American Summer: 10 Years Later.

1. THE WRITERS WERE INSPIRED BY THEIR OWN CAMP EXPERIENCES.

Director David Wain, who penned the script alongside longtime pal and collaborator Michael Showalter, remembers what a big deal Skylab was during the summer he spent at Maine's Camp Modin in 1979. "Kids like us were like, 'Oh my God, do you think Skylab's going to fall on our camp?'" Wain told DETAILS. "And then we'd see a piece of metal and it was like, 'Do you think that's a piece of Skylab?'"

The hour-long trip to town was inspired—sort of—by Showalter's camp experience. "That was something you did at my camp sometimes," he shared. "It was considered a big, awesome thing, kind of like going off-campus in high school." Presumably, though, his sojourns didn't involve a crack den.

2. MICHAEL SHOWALTER AND DAVID WAIN SPENT THREE YEARS FINDING FINANCING.

"Over and over again, we were told, 'We're giving you the money!'" Wain said. "Then these people would disappear. I remember trying to track someone down in their office in the East Village to confront them. And the ‘office’ was someone’s house, and there was no one there by that name.” Ultimately, getting Janeane Garofalo and David Hyde Pierce—at the time, two of the cast's biggest names—to sign on helped their cause.

3. THE ENTIRE BUDGET WAS JUST $1.8 MILLION.

Paul Rudd, who plays Camp Firewood's resident bad boy Andy, says no one was really in this for the money. In fact, "I'm not sure I got paid," he told Entertainment Weekly. "I'm not kidding … it was such a small production, and stuff fell through the cracks."

4. IT LAUNCHED SOME MAJOR CAREERS.

The cast of Wet Hot American Summer is full of familiar faces, including Elizabeth Banks, who scored the part of Lindsay (a.k.a. Barbecue Girl) while she was working as a cocktail waitress in New York. Bradley Cooper, meanwhile, missed his graduation from The Actors Studio because of Wet Hot American Summer's production schedule.

5. THE CAST LIVED AT THE CAMP WHERE THE MOVIE WAS FILMED.

Everyone bunked together at Pennsylvania's Camp Towanda for the month-long shoot. Rudd told Details that the experience was "definitely like camp, only we were allowed to have beer." Amy Poehler (who plays talent show director Susie) joked that the shoot felt like a necessary do-over: "We were being given the chance to take one more shot at summer camp, only we were wiser, better drinkers, and more sexually experienced."

6. YES, THEY ATE THEIR MEALS IN THE CAFETERIA.

The fare didn't really hold up, according to Michael Ian Black (McKinley). Pizza bagels "every day when you're 11 is a dream. When you're 30, and it's pizza bagels every day, you wanna kill somebody." 

7. HANK AZARIA IS A CAMP TOWANDA ALUM.


Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images

Garofalo called Hank Azaria after seeing his name on a plaque by a bunk. "She said, 'I'm staring at your name right now. What gives?'" Azaria, who spent every summer at Towanda from the time he was six years old until he was 15, told Entertainment Weekly, "It was fantastic, some of the happiest times of my life."

8. WHEN THE CAST WASN'T SHOOTING, THEY WERE DRINKING. A LOT.

"Everybody stayed up late. Everybody partied," Rudd told Details. ("There were totally random hookups," Wain admitted.) One night the group even decided to have a camp dance. "They hired this DJ, Mr. Blue, who was friends with the guys from The State, and we had a rave on the grass of the camp," Poehler told the magazine. "He played great '80s music, and we all went into the wardrobe department and put on outfits and had sparklers and danced." 

9. THE WEATHER WAS TERRIBLE.

It rained 25 out of 28 shooting days, turning Camp Towanda's grounds into a giant (freezing) mudpit. "We were wearing three layers of clothing at all times, unless we were shooting, when we were wearing basically nothing," Marguerite Moreau (Katie) revealed to Details. Luckily for the already cash-strapped production, the crew was (mostly) able to work around it. "The one thing about the rain is, even when it's pouring, unless you light for it, it doesn't fully show up on camera. So a lot of times we just shot in the rain," Wain said. It was, for example, pouring for the campfire intro. After a crew member tried and failed to get a fire going, Camp Towanda's director had to intervene and start a fire for them.

10. WHEN IT CAME TO ENTERTAINING THEMSELVES, THE CAST GOT CREATIVE.

Filming took place during the pre-smartphone era, and the nearest attraction was a Walmart a half-hour away. So to amuse themselves, the cast turned to games, including Stratego, backgammon, and stickball, and spent time decorating their cabins. "We would go to Walmart and buy posters and put them in people's rooms," recalled Poehler. "I remember having a lot of *NSYNC." Another popular wall art option: Britney Spears. Ken Marino (Victor) carried around a portable TV "cause he wanted to watch Juliana Margulies's last ER or something," Poehler said. "I remember him running around, crying, being like, 'She went back to Clooney! She went back to Clooney!'"

11. CHRISTOPHER MELONI LOOKED TO RAMBO FOR INSPIRATION.

To play deranged camp cook (and Vietnam vet) Gene, Meloni—who had just started on Law and Order: SVU—grew a beard and gained weight. At his audition, he did his best to channel film's most iconic Vietnam veteran. "I saw him as a whacked-out, cuddly Rambo," Meloni told Details.

12. ALMOST NONE OF THE MOVIE WAS IMPROVISED.

Despite the cast's impressive sketch comedy chops, for the most part, they stuck to Wain and Showalter's script. As Black explained, "The script was pretty locked in. When you have a budget that small, and you have to make your days, and you're fighting the weather, there isn't time to f--k around that much."

13. THE FILM WAS A FINANCIAL FLOP.


Michael Showalter and David Wain.
Evan Agostini/Getty Images

Wain and Showalter struggled to find a backer at Sundance, and the film raked in just $300,000 at the box office.

14. CRITICS HATED IT.

Although Entertainment Weekly'sOwen Gleiberman gave Wet Hot American Summer an 'A', he was one of the few who seemed to enjoy it. The Oregonian called it "agony on a stick," and in his review, Roger Ebert decided to parody "Hello Muddah, Hello Faddah," writing, "Wow I hate it something fierce / Except the astrophysicist David Hyde Pierce.”

In the year since its release, the film has gained a reputation as a cult comedy classic and has spawned two Netflix series: a 2015 prequel, Wet Hot American Summer: First Day of Camp, and a sequel, Wet Hot American Summer: 10 Years Later, which will drop on Netflix on August 4, 2017.

15. IT WAS AN EXPERIENCE THAT BRADLEY COOPER WON'T FORGET.


Universal Pictures Home Entertainment

Of all the stars he's locked lips with, Cooper told Regis Philbin and Kelly Ripa in 2010 that Michael Ian Black is his favorite onscreen kiss. A flattered Black responded via Twitter, with one correction:  

Peter Dinklage Just Hinted That Tyrion Will Die in Game of Thrones

HBO
HBO

​If there's one thing HBO's Game of Thrones has done in the seven seasons it's been on the air, it's ​completely disrupt fan expectations. Tropes that worked in the original books, like killing off major characters almost randomly, were assumed not to translate well to television until the first season of the show killed off presumed series protagonist Ned Stark.

And now star Peter Dinklage has horrified fans by just suggesting that his character, ​Tyrion Lannister, might not make it out of the upcoming eighth and final season of the show alive. In an interview with ​Vulture, Dinklage stated, "I think [Tyrion] was given a very good conclusion. No matter what that is. Death can be a great way out."

Though he could be indulging in the traditional Game of Thrones style of answering interview questions, a.k.a. keep everything vague and leave as many possible interpretations as possible, it's completely within the realm of possibility that ​Tyrion will leave the show at the end of a blade. If that's the case, many fans agree it will no doubt be held by his sister and apparent rival, Cersei, who currently sits on the Iron Throne.

Cersei has always been cautions and resentful of Tyrion due to a prophecy that stated she would die by the hand of a "little brother," whom she believes to be her dwarf younger sibling. A prominent fan theory states that Cersei will kill Tyrion, which will in turn give their brother and Cersei's twin Jaime the motivation to overcome his love of Cersei and slay her.

Dinklage, for his part, doesn't seem too torn up about the prospect of Tyrion dying, saying he felt the character had a good trajectory over the seasons. "He used his position as the outcast of his family like an adolescent would," the actor shared. "The beauty of Tyrion is that he grew out of that mode in a couple of seasons and developed a strong sense of responsibility."

HBO Releases First Watchmen TV Series Teaser

HBO
HBO

​Once it airs the eighth and final season of Game of Thrones, ​HBO will be temporarily left without a real signature show. Sure, it has some big series like Westworld, Barry, and Last Week Tonight With John Oliver, but Game of Thrones has been its major tent pole for the better part of a decade and losing it will be a big hit for the cable network.

It's currently making a prequel series to the show, but until that starts airing, HBO is subtly shifting its attention to the Watchmen series the network has been planning for some time. Based on the legendary graphic novel by Alan Moore of the same name, HBO recently created an Instagram account for the show and posted the first image from the production.

Who Watches The Watchmen? #WatchmenHBO

A post shared by Watchmen (@watchmen) on

Captioned with the quote "​Who Watches the Watchmen?," the short, soundless video has sent the internet into a fury trying to decipher who it depicts. The most popular theories are that it is either Rorschach, the masked protagonist of the original comic, or the Comedian, the jingoistic and militant hero whose death is the driving mystery behind the graphic novel.

While neither Rorschach or the Comedian are police officers and neither wears a yellow mask, Rorschach's famously morphing mask is similar in style and the yellow color evokes imagery of the Comedian's iconic smiley face pin. Though the show shares a name and is based on Moore's graphic novel, showrunner ​Damon Lindelof has revealed that his series will take place in an alternate timeline that loosely follows the events of the story.

While not much is known about the details of the series, the announced cast list includes the likes of Regina King, Jeremy Irons, Don Johnson, Tim Blake Nelson, Louis Gossett Jr., Yahya Abdul-Mateen II, Andrew Howard, Tom Mison, Frances Fisher, Jacob Ming-Trent, Sara Vickers, and Dylan Schombing.

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