Watch 11,000 Marbles Run Wild

Some people build model trains. Some people play video games. Jelle Bakker, known as The Marble Master, builds super-complex Rube Goldberg machines for his tens of thousands of marbles to run through. It's good to have a hobby.

In this video, we see the Marble Tsunami, a giant contraption through which 11,000 marbles flow. As they roll along, the marbles set off chimes, hit bells and bumpers (like in a pinball game), go around loops, tip trays, and do other rather impressive mechanical things. The most incredible aspect is the sound of these things clattering; when installed, Bakker promises sound-dampening material to protect viewers' ears. (This thing is going on display this month at the Gouda Monkey Town Indoor Playground in The Netherlands.) For now, just turn down the sound.

Prepare to lose your marbles.

Fun fact: This kind of machine is called a "knikkerbaan," which roughly translates to "marble lane." (Thank you, reader Miranda Kate!)

(Via the always-excellent The Kid Should See This.)

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How Your Sleeping Position Can Help (or Harm) Your Health
iStock
iStock

Getting a good night's sleep is key to your health, but what's the best position for maximizing those benefits? According to SciShow, the answer depends on who you are and what your body is presently doing. Do you have acid reflux? You might want to avoid sleeping on your right side, since studies have shown that can aggravate heartburn (though scientists still aren't quite sure why). Are you pregnant? Aim for the left side, since it helps blood and nutrients flow to the placenta, among other benefits. Do you snore? Maybe avoid sleeping on your back, and roll over on your side instead. The video below goes over the whole menu of possible sleeping positions, and explains which ones will help you get the most out of your 40 winks.

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NASA, Getty Images
Watch Apollo 11 Launch
Vice President Spiro Agnew and former President Lyndon Johnson view the liftoff of Apollo 11
Vice President Spiro Agnew and former President Lyndon Johnson view the liftoff of Apollo 11
NASA, Getty Images

Apollo 11 launched on July 16, 1969, on its way to the moon. In the video below, Mark Gray shows slow-motion footage of the launch (a Saturn V rocket) and explains in glorious detail what's going on from a technical perspective—the launch is very complex, and lots of stuff has to happen just right in order to get a safe launch. The video is mesmerizing, the narration is informative. Prepare to geek out about rockets! (Did you know the hold-down arms actually catch on fire after the rocket lifts off?)

Apollo 11 Saturn V Launch (HD) Camera E-8 from Spacecraft Films on Vimeo.

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