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Images courtesy of Daniel Britton
Images courtesy of Daniel Britton

This Font Simulates What It's Like to Have Dyslexia

Images courtesy of Daniel Britton
Images courtesy of Daniel Britton

When graphic designer Daniel Britton shared his recent dyslexia diagnosis with his classmates at the London School of Communications, he was met with confusion, blank stares, and outright derision.

Realizing that there was no way for them to truly understand his struggle to make sense of letters, Britton decided to create a font—called “Dyslexia”—in order to give non-dyslexics a sense of what the learning disorder entails.

The designer tells Fast Company the font isn’t meant to depict exactly what a dyslexic sees when he or she picks up a text. “At least in the UK, awareness ads will represent text as seen by dyslexics as a bunch of blurry letters, or an upside-down letter form,” Britton says. “At least for me, that’s not what it’s like at all. It’s more like the text looks normal, but the part of my brain that decodes it just isn’t awake.”

 

Britton created Dyslexia by subtracting 40 percent of the lines from each character in the Helvetica alphabet. This renders the letters somewhat recognizable—but the overall effect means the brain must take its time picking out and stringing together formerly recognizable characters.

After showing his work to a few peers, Britton—who recently landed a job with a local dyslexia awareness commission—feels like he accomplished what he set out to do.

“When I showed it to classmates, they were suddenly like ‘Oh! Okay. I get it,'” he shares. “Which is all I needed to hear.”

See more of his work on his website.

[h/t Fast Company]

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Pop Chart Lab
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Comics
The Origins of 36 Marvel Characters, Illustrated
Pop Chart Lab
Pop Chart Lab

No matter what their powers, every super hero has an origin story, from Spider-Man’s radioactive bite to Iron Man’s life-threatening chest shrapnel. In their latest poster, the designers at Pop Chart Lab have taken their infographic savvy to the Marvel Universe, charting the heroic origins of 36 different Marvel characters through miniature, minimalist comics.

Without using any words, they’ve managed to illustrate Bucky Barnes's plane explosion and subsequent transformation into the Winter Soldier, Jessica Jones’s car crash, the death of the Punisher’s family, and other classic stories from the major Marvel canon while paying tribute to the comic book form.

Explore the poster below, and see a zoomable version on Pop Chart Lab’s website.

A poster featuring 36 minimalist illustrations of superhero origin stories.
Pop Chart Lab

Keep your eyes open for future Marvel-Pop Chart crossovers. The Marvel Origins: A Sequential Compendium poster is “the first release of what we hope to be a marvelous partnership,” as Pop Chart Lab’s Galvin Chow puts it. Prints are available for pre-order starting at $37 and are scheduled to start shipping on March 8.

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iStock
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technology
The Design Tricks That Make Smartphones Addictive—And How to Fight Them
iStock
iStock

Two and a half billion people worldwide—and 77 percent of Americans—have smartphones, which means you probably have plenty of company in your inability to go five minutes without checking your device. But as a new video from Vox points out, it's not that we all lack self-control: Your phone is designed down to the tiniest details to keep you as engaged as possible. Vox spoke to Tristan Harris, a former Google design ethicist, who explains how your push notifications, the "pull to refresh" feature of certain apps (inspired by slot machines), and the warm, bright colors on your phone are all meant to hook you. Fortunately, he also notes there's things you can do to lessen the hold, from the common sense (limit your notifications) to the drastic (go grayscale). Watch the whole thing to learn all the dirty details—and then see how long you can spend without looking at your phone.

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