the kiss, Gustav Klimt
the kiss, Gustav Klimt

15 Things You Should Know About Klimt’s The Kiss

the kiss, Gustav Klimt
the kiss, Gustav Klimt

A masterpiece of the early Modern period, Gustav Klimt's The Kiss is a deceptively simple portrait of lust and love. But beyond that glittery gold leaf, the work is full of fascinating facts. 

1. Klimt’s career was on the downswing when he painted The Kiss.   

Before creating this piece, Klimt had received scathing scorn in the first decade of the 20th century for his three-part University of Vienna Ceiling Paintings. Because of the nudity in these works, his interpretation of Philosophy, Medicine and Jurisprudence were derided as "pornography" and "perverted excess," wounding his reputation. 

2. Klimt created his most famous work in a time of creative panic. 

In 1907, perhaps reeling from the poor reception of the Vienna Ceiling Paintings, Klimt was sketching furiously, but he doubted his work. He confessed in a letter, "Either I am too old, or too nervous, or too stupid—there must be something wrong." But before long, he would begin the painting that would be his most popular.

3. The Kiss was bought before it was finished

In 1908, the Austrian Gallery displayed The Kiss for the first time, even though Klimt hadn't yet put the finishing touches on the work. Its unfinished state didn't stop the Belvedere Museum (a.k.a. The Österreichische Galerie Belvedere) from adding it to their collection on the spot. 

4. The Kiss's sale broke records. 

How do you buy a work of art that hasn’t even been finished yet? You make an offer that can’t be refused. To acquire this transcendent piece of art, the Belvedere paid 25,000 crowns (or about $240,000 today). Prior to this mammoth sale, the highest price paid for a painting in Austria was a relatively paltry 500 crowns. 

5. That price turned out to be a bargain. 

Austria considers The Kiss a national treasure, and so the Viennese museum that has long been its home would never dream of selling it. However, if such a transaction were to happen, it's predicted The Kiss would break sales records again. After all, Klimt's less renowned (though still quite famous) Adele Bloch-Bauer I sold for $135 million in 2006. The New York Times noted at that time this was "the highest sum ever paid for a painting." 

6. The piece reflects a collision of artistic styles. 

The pose of the lovers depicted in The Kiss reflects the natural forms favored in the Vienna Art Nouveau (of Vienna Jugendstil) movement. But the simple forms with the bold patterns of the pair's cloaks shows the impact of the Arts and Crafts movement, while the use of spirals harkens back to Bronze Age art. 

7. It's a prime example of Klimt's "Golden Period." 

Inspired by the Byzantine mosaics he'd seen on his travels, Klimt mingled gold leaf into his oil paints to create what would become his signature style. 

8. The Kiss was a departure from a major Klimt theme. 

The painter’s works mostly focused on women, so the inclusion of a man—albeit one whose face is obscured—was unusual for Klimt. The figures' modest dress also marks this painting as one of Klimt's more conservative creations.  

9. The Kiss may be a self-portrait. 

Some art historians have theorized that the lovers seen lip-locked here are none other than the Austrian painter and his long-time partner, fashion designer Emilie Flöge, who he had previously depicted in a portrait

10. Or the girl might be another recurring muse. 

Others have posited that The Kiss's lovely lady was actually salon hostess and society woman Adele Bloch-Bauer, who had posed for a Golden Period portrait that same year. Still others have suggested the red hair is a clue that this is 'Red Hilda,' the model Klimt employed for Danae, Lady with Hat and Feather Boa, and Goldfish

11. It's really big. 

The Kiss measures 180 centimeters by 180 centimeters, nearly a 6-foot square. 

12. Its shape is often modified for merchandising. 

While Klimt's original composition is a perfect square, the popularity of the painting spurred countless reproductions on posters, postcards and various mementos. But these souvenirs regularly truncate the right and left sides of the painting to make for a more standard rectangle display.

13. The Kiss is arguably blasphemous. 

Klimt's use of gold calls back to the kinds of religious art found in churches. Using gold leaf here to celebrate the earthly pleasures and sensuality of sexuality was considered by some profane. 

14. Klimt and The Kiss were minted. 

In 2003, Austria released a commemorative 100 Euro coin that had a etching of The Kiss on one side, and a portrait of Klimt at work in his studio on the other. 

15. The Kiss never disappoints in person. 

Maybe it's the grand scale. Maybe it's the gold. But when re-assessing The Kiss for Klimt’s 150th birthday, journalist Adrian Brijbassi wrote, "The Kiss by Gustav Klimt surpasses expectations," unlike that tiny and underwhelming Mona Lisa

After throwing shade on the more famous painting, Brijbassi explained, "[The Kiss] does what a great piece of art is supposed to do: Hold your gaze, make you admire its aesthetic qualities while trying to discern what’s beyond its superficial aspects."

Take that, Mona.

Art
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Tom Etherington, Penguin Press
The Covers of Jack Kerouac's Classic Titles Are Getting a Makeover
Tom Etherington, Penguin Press
Tom Etherington, Penguin Press

Readers have been enjoying classic Jack Kerouac books like The Dharma Bums and On the Road for decades, but starting this August the novels will have a new look. Several abstract covers have been unveiled as part of Penguin’s "Great Kerouac" series, according to design website It’s Nice That.

The vibrant covers, designed by Tom Etherington of Penguin Press, feature the works of abstract expressionist painter Franz Kline. The artwork is intended to capture “the experience of reading Kerouac” rather than illustrating a particular scene or character, Etherington told It’s Nice That. Indeed, abstract styles of artwork seem a fitting match for Kerouac’s “spontaneous prose”—a writing style that was influenced by improvisational jazz music.

This year marks the 60th anniversary of The Dharma Bums, which was published just one year after On the Road. The Great Kerouac series will be available for purchase on August 2.

[h/t It's Nice That]

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John MacDougall, Getty Images
Stolpersteine: One Artist's International Memorial to the Holocaust
John MacDougall, Getty Images
John MacDougall, Getty Images

The most startling memorial to victims of the Holocaust may also be the easiest to miss. Embedded in the sidewalks of more than 20 countries, more than 60,000 Stolpersteine—German for “stumbling stones”—mark the spots where victims last resided before they were forced to leave their homes. The modest, nearly 4-by-4-inch brass blocks, each the size of a single cobblestone, are planted outside the doorways of row houses, bakeries, and coffee houses. Each tells a simple yet chilling story: A person lived here. This is what happened to them.

Here lived Hugo Lippers
Born 1878
Arrested 11/9/1938 — Altstrelitzer prison
Deported 1942 Auschwitz
Murdered

The project is the brainchild of the German artist Gunter Demnig, who first had the idea in the early 1990s as he studied the Nazis' deportation of Sinti and Roma people. His first installations were guerrilla artwork: According to Reuters, Demnig laid his first 41 blocks in Berlin without official approval. The city, however, soon endorsed the idea and granted him permission to install more. Today, Berlin has more than 5000.

Demnig lays a Stolpersteine.
Artist Gunter Demnig lays a Stolpersteine outside a residence in Hamburg, Germany in 2012.
Patrick Lux, Getty Images

The Stolpersteine are unique in their individuality. Too often, the millions of Holocaust victims are spoken of as a nameless mass. And while the powerful memorials and museums in places such as Berlin and Washington, D.C. are an antidote to that, the Stolpersteine are special—they are decentralized, integrated into everyday life. You can walk down a sidewalk, look down, and suddenly find yourself standing where a person's life changed. History becomes unavoidably present.

That's because, unlike gravestones, the stumbling stones mark an important date between a person’s birth and death: the day that person was forced to abandon his or her home. As a result, not every stumbling stone is dedicated to a person who was murdered. Some plaques commemorate people who fled Europe and survived. Others honor people who were deported but managed to escape. The plaques aim to memorialize the moment a person’s life was irrevocably changed—no matter how it ended.

The ordinariness of the surrounding landscape—a buzzing cafe, a quaint bookstore, a tree-lined street—only heightens that effect. As David Crew writes for Not Even Past, “[Demnig] thought the stones would encourage ordinary citizens to realize that Nazi persecution and terror had begun on their very doorsteps."

A man in a shop holding a hammer making a Stolpersteine.
Artisan Michael Friedrichs-Friedlaender hammers inscriptions into the brass plaques at the Stolpersteine manufacturing studio in Berlin.
Sean Gallup, Getty Images

While Demnig installs every single Stolpersteine himself, he does not work alone. His project, which stretches from Germany to Brazil, relies on the research of hundreds of outside volunteers. Their efforts have not only helped Demnig create a striking memorial, but have also helped historians better document the lives of individuals who will never be forgotten.

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