Owl Farm, the Aspen, Colo.-area home where Hunter S. Thompson lived for 35 years, has remained largely as he left it when he took his own life 10 years ago at the age of 67. Recently, in a conversation with The Cannabist, his widow Anita Thompson explains why—and it should get gonzo journalism fans excited.

"I’m working to make it a museum,” she told them during a barbeque for the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws’ annual meeting in Aspen. "That’s why these rooms have remained the way Hunter left them. At first it brought me comfort, and then over the last few years, I’ve kept it this way simply because it is history. I want others to experience it."

There's no timeline yet to turn Thompson's last home—which is also his final resting place; his ashes were blasted out of a cannon during his funeral at Owl Farm—into a tourist attraction, but once it's up and running, it's sure to attract fans of the late writer's revolutionary style.

[h/t Esquire]