13 Creatures that Could Show Up in Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them

Principal photography hasn’t yet begun on 2016's Harry Potter spinoff Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, which will follow the adventures of wizard and magizoologist Newt Scamander as he encounters all manner of magical creatures 70 years before Harry's time at Hogwarts. (J.K. Rowling has penned the script, and Eddie Redmayne has signed on to star.) But thanks to a book version of Fantastic Beasts, first published in 2001 with Rowling writing as Scamander, we can get a glimpse at some of the creatures that might make cameos in the new film—as well as just how dangerous they are according to the Ministry of Magic. Here are a few that seem particularly cinematic.

1. ASHWINDER

Rating: XXX // Competent wizard should cope

Basilisks and Nagini aren’t the only horrifying snakes in the wizarding world. The Ashwinder is “a thin, pale-gray serpent with glowing red eyes” that is “created when a magical fire”—any flames to which a magical substance, like Flue powder, has been added—“is allowed to burn unchecked for too long.” The snake “will rise from the embers of an unsupervised fire and slither away into the shadows of the dwelling ... leaving an ashy trail behind it.”

The Ashwinder lives only an hour; after it lays its eggs in a dark spot, it collapses to ash. The eggs “are brilliant red and give off intense heat. They will ignite the dwelling within minutes if not found and frozen with a suitable charm.” Once frozen, the eggs are used in love potions and, when eaten whole, can cure ague.

2. BILLYWIG

Rating: XX // Harmless, may be domesticated

This Australian insect is “around half an inch long and a vivid sapphire blue,” with wings “attached to the top of its head ... rotated very fast so that is spins when it flies." The Billywig is so fast it’s rarely noticed by Muggles; its sting creates giddiness, then levitation: “Too many stings cause the victim to hover uncontrollably for days on end, and where there is a severe allergic reaction, permanent floating may ensue.”

3. DEMIGUISE

Rating: XXXX // Dangerous/Requires specialist knowledge/skilled wizard may handle

This docile, herbivorous animal is found in the Far East and resembles “a graceful ape in appearance, with large, black, doleful eyes” and a body “covered with long, fine, silky, silvery hair.” When threatened, the demiguise goes invisible. For this reason, its pelts are very valuable—the hair is used to make invisibility cloaks. (The Demiguise shouldn’t be confused with the Yeti, which also appears in the book.)

4. DIRICAWL

Rating: XX // Harmless, may be domesticated

This creature might sound familiar. The Diricawl hails from Mauritius, and is “a plump-bodied, fluffy-feathered, flightless bird” that, when threatened, vanishes “in a puff of feathers and reappear[s] elsewhere.” Muggles knew of this creature at one point, but obviously didn’t know it could vanish, and so they “believe they have hunted the species to extinction.” Yup, the Diricawl is the Dodo. The International Confederation of Wizards has decided never to reveal the dodo’s continued existence to Muggles, because the situation “seems to have raised Muggle awareness of the dangers of slaying their fellow creatures indiscriminately.”

5. DRAGON

Rating: XXXXX // Known wizard killer/impossible to train or domesticate

It seems a fair bet that at least one dragon will pop up in Fantastic Beasts. It could be one we’ve seen before—perhaps the Hungarian Horntail, “supposedly the most dangerous of all dragon breeds,” which Harry faced off against in the Triwizard Tournament in Goblet of Fire—or it could be another of the 10 breeds listed in the book. Fingers crossed for the Ukranian Ironbelly, which, at 6 tons, is the biggest dragon of them all. Though the book notes that the animal is rotund and slower in flight than many other dragon breeds, “the Ironbelly is nevertheless extremely dangerous, capable of crushing dwellings on which it lands” with talons that are “particularly long and vicious.”

6. ERKLING

Rating: XXXX // Dangerous/Requires specialist knowledge/skilled wizard may handle

The Brothers Grimm might have written cautionary tales about Erklings if they hadn’t been mere Muggles. This creature, native to the Black Forest in Germany, is 3 feet high “with a pointed face and a high-pitched cackle that is particularly entrancing to children, whom it will attempt to lure away from their guardians and eat.”

7. FIRE CRAB

Rating: XXX // Competent wizard should cope

This animal, native to Fiji, looks more like a tortoise than a crab. It has a “heavily jeweled shell,” which “unscrupulous wizards” have turned into cauldrons. The crab does have a defense mechanism, though: When threatened, it shoots flames from its bum.

8. JOBBERKNOLL

Rating: XX // Harmless, may be domesticated

This “tiny blue, speckled bird” native to Northern Europe and America doesn’t make any sound at all during its life. But the moment it dies, “it lets out a long scream made up of every sound it has ever heard, regurgitated backwards.” Its feathers are used in memory potions and truth serums.

9. LETHIFOLD

Rating: XXXXX // Known wizard killer/impossible to train or domesticate

Also known as The Living Shroud, this “mercifully rare creature” is found only in tropical climes, and “resembles a black cloak perhaps half an inch thick (thicker if it has killed an digested a victim), which glides along the ground at night.” It sounds like a Dementor—to which it may be related—and, as with Dementors, the only way to repel a Lethifold is to use a Patronus Charm.

But there are some key differences between the two: The Lethifold typically attacks the sleeping, giving its victims little chance to fight back. Dementors suck out the souls out of anyone unlucky enough to stumble upon them, eventually administering a kiss that leaves victims alive, but empty shells. A Lethifold, however, suffocates its prey, consuming and digesting the victim in his or her own bed. It leaves the house “slightly thicker and fatter than before, leaving no trace of itself or its victim behind.”

10. NUNDU

Rating: XXXXX // Known wizard killer/impossible to train or domesticate

This beast, which hails from East Africa, is described as “a gigantic leopard” that moves silently and is “arguably the most dangerous [creature] in the world.” Its breath causes disease that can destroy entire villages; subduing it takes at least 100 exceptionally skilled wizards working together.

11. POGREBIN

Rating: XXX // Competent wizard should cope

This 12-inch-tall Russian demon has “a hairy body but a smooth, oversize gray head,” which helps it resemble a rock when crouching. The creatures enjoy following humans, “staying in their shadow and crouching quickly should the shadow’s owner turn around.” If this is allowed to continue for a number of hours, the victim will eventually be overcome with futility and despair: “When the victim stops walking and sinks to their knees to weep at the pointlessness of it all, the Pogrebin will leap upon them and attempt to devour them.” Repelling the demon is as easy as using a hex or a Stupefying Charm, and, if all else fails, “kicking has also been found effective.”

12. QUINTAPED

Rating: XXXXX // Known wizard killer/impossible to train or domesticate

Muggles and wizards alike have much to fear from this “highly dangerous carnivorous beast,” which has a “particular taste for humans.” Its body is low to the ground and covered with reddish-brown hair; it has five legs, each ending in a clubfoot. The creatures were created when one wizard clan transfigured another. Thankfully, these creatures are only found on an unplottable island off the northernmost tip of Scotland.

13. STREELER

Rating: XXX // Competent wizard should cope

The venom produced by this giant snail, which changes color every hour, “shrivels and and burns all vegetation over which is passes” and “is one of the few substances known to kill Horklumps,” mushroom-like creatures that infest gardens.

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Central Press/Getty Images
Ernest Hemingway’s Guide to Life, In 20 Quotes
Central Press/Getty Images
Central Press/Getty Images

Though he made his living as a writer, Ernest Hemingway was just as famous for his lust for adventure. Whether he was running with the bulls in Pamplona, fishing for marlin in Bimini, throwing back rum cocktails in Havana, or hanging out with his six-toed cats in Key West, the Nobel and Pulitzer Prize-winning author never did anything halfway. And he used his adventures as fodder for the unparalleled collection of novels, short stories, and nonfiction books he left behind, The Sun Also Rises, A Farewell to Arms, Death in the Afternoon, For Whom the Bell Tolls, and The Old Man and the Sea among them.

On what would be his 119th birthday—he was born in Oak Park, Illinois on July 21, 1899—here are 20 memorable quotes that offer a keen perspective into Hemingway’s way of life.

ON THE IMPORTANCE OF LISTENING

"I like to listen. I have learned a great deal from listening carefully. Most people never listen."

ON TRUST

"The best way to find out if you can trust somebody is to trust them."

ON DECIDING WHAT TO WRITE ABOUT

"I never had to choose a subject—my subject rather chose me."

ON TRAVEL

"Never go on trips with anyone you do not love."


Ernest Hemingway Photograph Collection, John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Boston. [1], Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN INTELLIGENCE AND HAPPINESS

"Happiness in intelligent people is the rarest thing I know."

ON TRUTH

"There's no one thing that is true. They're all true."

ON THE DOWNSIDE OF PEOPLE

"The only thing that could spoil a day was people. People were always the limiters of happiness, except for the very few that were as good as spring itself."

ON SUFFERING FOR YOUR ART

"There is nothing to writing. All you do is sit down at a typewriter and bleed."

ON TAKING ACTION

"Never mistake motion for action."

ON GETTING WORDS OUT

"I wake up in the morning and my mind starts making sentences, and I have to get rid of them fast—talk them or write them down."


Photograph by Mary Hemingway, in the Ernest Hemingway Photograph Collection, John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Boston., Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

ON THE BENEFITS OF SLEEP

"I love sleep. My life has the tendency to fall apart when I'm awake, you know?"

ON FINDING STRENGTH 

"The world breaks everyone, and afterward, some are strong at the broken places."

ON THE TRUE NATURE OF WICKEDNESS

"All things truly wicked start from innocence."

ON WRITING WHAT YOU KNOW

"If a writer knows enough about what he is writing about, he may omit things that he knows. The dignity of movement of an iceberg is due to only one ninth of it being above water."

ON THE DEFINITION OF COURAGE

"Courage is grace under pressure."

ON THE PAINFULNESS OF BEING FUNNY

"A man's got to take a lot of punishment to write a really funny book."


By Ernest Hemingway Photograph Collection, John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Boston. - JFK Library, Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

ON KEEPING PROMISES

"Always do sober what you said you'd do drunk. That will teach you to keep your mouth shut."

ON GOOD VS. EVIL

"About morals, I know only that what is moral is what you feel good after and what is immoral is what you feel bad after."

ON REACHING FOR THE UNATTAINABLE

"For a true writer, each book should be a new beginning where he tries again for something that is beyond attainment. He should always try for something that has never been done or that others have tried and failed. Then sometimes, with great luck, he will succeed."

ON HAPPY ENDINGS

"There is no lonelier man in death, except the suicide, than that man who has lived many years with a good wife and then outlived her. If two people love each other there can be no happy end to it."

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Marvel Entertainment
10 Facts About Robert E. Howard’s Conan the Barbarian
Marvel Entertainment
Marvel Entertainment

Nearly every sword-wielding fantasy hero from the 20th century owes a tip of their horned helmet to Robert E. Howard’s Conan the Barbarian. Set in the fictional Hyborian Age, after the destruction of Atlantis but before our general recorded history, Conan's stories have depicted him as everything from a cunning thief to a noble king and all types of scoundrel in between. But beneath that blood-soaked sword and shield is a character that struck a nerve with generations of fantasy fans, spawning adaptations in comics, video games, movies, TV shows, and cartoons in the eight decades since he first appeared in the December 1932 issue of Weird Tales. So thank Crom, because here are 10 facts about Conan the Barbarian.

1. THE FIRST OFFICIAL CONAN STORY WAS A KULL REWRITE.

Conan wasn’t the only barbarian on Robert E. Howard’s resume. In 1929, the writer created Kull the Conqueror, a more “introspective” brand of savage that gained enough interest to eventually find his way onto the big screen in 1997. The two characters share more than just a common creator and a general disdain for shirts, though: the first Conan story to get published, “The Phoenix on the Sword,” was actually a rewrite of an earlier rejected Kull tale titled “By This Axe I Rule!” For this new take on the plot, Howard introduced supernatural elements and more action. The end result was more suited to what Weird Tales wanted, and it became the foundation for future Conan tales.

2. BUT A “PROTO-CONAN” STORY PRECEDED IT.

A few months before Conan made his debut in Weird Tales, Howard wrote a story called "People of the Dark" for Strange Tales of Mystery and Terror about a man named John O’Brien who seemed to relive his past life as a brutish, black-haired warrior named … Conan of the reavers. Reave is a word from Old English meaning to raid or plunder, which is obviously in the same ballpark as barbarian. And in the story, there is also a reference to Crom, the fictional god of the Hyborian age that later became a staple of the Conan mythology. This isn't the barbarian as we know him, and it's certainly not an official Conan tale, but the early ideas were there.

3. ROBERT E. HOWARD NEVER INTENDED TO WRITE THESE STORIES IN ORDER.

Howard was meticulous in his world-building for Conan, which was highlighted by his 8600-word history on the Hyborian Age the character lived in. But the one area the creator had no interest in was linearity. Conan’s first story depicted him already as a king; subsequent stories, though, would shift back and forth, chronicling his early days as both a thief and a youthful adventurer.

There’s good reason for that, as Howard himself once explained: “In writing these yarns I've always felt less as creating them than as if I were simply chronicling his adventures as he told them to me. That's why they skip about so much, without following a regular order. The average adventurer, telling tales of a wild life at random, seldom follows any ordered plan, but narrates episodes widely separated by space and years, as they occur to him.”

4. THERE ARE NUMEROUS CONNECTIONS TO THE H.P. LOVECRAFT MYTHOS.

For fans of the pulp magazines of the early 20th century, one of the only names bigger than Robert E. Howard was H.P. Lovecraft. The two weren’t competitors, though—rather, they were close friends and correspondents. They’d often mail each other drafts of their stories, discuss the themes of their work, and generally talk shop. And as Lovecraft’s own mythology was growing, it seems like their work began to bleed together.

In “The Phoenix on the Sword,” Howard made reference to “vast shadowy outlines of the Nameless Old Ones,” which could be seen as a reference to the ancient, godlike “Old Ones” from the Lovecraft mythos. In the book The Coming of Conan the Cimmerian, editor Patrice Louinet even wrote that Howard’s earlier draft for the story name-dropped Lovecraft’s actual Old Ones, most notably Cthulhu.

In Lovecraft’s “The Shadow of Time,” he describes a character named Crom-Ya as a “Cimmerian chieftain,” which is a reference to Conan's homeland and god. These examples just scratch the surface of names, places, and concepts that the duo’s work share. Whether you want to read it all as a fun homage or an early attempt at a shared universe is up to you.

5. SEVERAL OF HOWARD’S STORIES WERE REWRITTEN AS CONAN STORIES POSTHUMOUSLY.

Howard was only 30 when he died, so there aren’t as many completed Conan stories out in the world as you’d imagine—and there are even less that were finished and officially printed. Despite that, the character’s popularity has only grown since the 1930s, and publishers looked for a way to print more of Howard’s Conan decades after his death. Over the years, writers and editors have gone back into Howard’s manuscripts for unfinished tales to doctor up and rewrite for publication, like "The Snout in the Dark," which was a fragment that was reworked by writers Lin Carter and L. Sprague de Camp. There were also times when Howard’s non-Conan drafts were repurposed as Conan stories by publishers, including all of the stories in 1955's Tales of Conan collection from Gnome Press.

6. FRANK FRAZETTA’S CONAN PAINTINGS REGULARLY SELL FOR SEVEN FIGURES.

Chances are, the image of Conan you have in your head right now owes a lot to artist Frank Frazetta: His version of the famous barbarian—complete with rippling muscles, pulsating veins, and copious amounts of sword swinging—would come to define the character for generations. But the look that people most associate with Conan didn’t come about until the character’s stories were reprinted decades after Robert E. Howard’s death.

“In 1966, Lancer Books published new paperbacks of Robert E. Howard's Conan series and hired my grandfather to do the cover art,” Sara Frazetta, Frazetta's granddaughter owner and operator of Frazetta Girls, tells Mental Floss. You could argue that Frazetta’s powerful covers were what drew most people to Conan during the '60s and '70s, and in recent years the collector’s market seems to validate that opinion. In 2012, the original painting for his Lancer version of Conan the Conqueror sold at auction for $1,000,000. Later, his Conan the Destroyer went for $1.5 million.

Still, despite all of Frazetta’s accomplishments, his granddaughter said there was one thing he always wanted: “His only regret was that he wished Robert E. Howard was alive so he could have seen what he did with his character.”

7. CONAN’S FIRST MARVEL COMIC WAS ALMOST CANCELED AFTER SEVEN ISSUES.

The cover to Marvel's Conan the Barbarian #21
Marvel Entertainment

Conan’s origins as a pulp magazine hero made him a natural fit for the medium’s logical evolution: the comic book. And in 1970, the character got his first high-profile comic launch when Marvel’s Conan The Barbarian hit shelves, courtesy of writer Roy Thomas and artist Barry Windsor-Smith.

Though now it’s hailed as one of the company’s highlights from the ‘70s, the book was nearly canceled after a mere seven issues. The problem is that while the debut issue sold well, each of the next six dropped in sales, leading Marvel’s then editor-in-chief, Stan Lee, to pull the book from production after the seventh issue hit stands.

Thomas pled his case, and Lee agreed to give Conan one last shot. But this time instead of the book coming out every month, it would be every two months. The plan worked, and soon sales were again on the rise and the book would stay in publication until 1993, again as a monthly. This success gave way to the Savage Sword of Conan, an oversized black-and-white spinoff magazine from Marvel that was aimed at adult audiences. It, too, was met with immense success, lasting from 1974 to 1995.

8. OLIVER STONE WROTE A FOUR-HOUR, POST-APOCALYPTIC CONAN MOVIE.

John Milius’s 1982 Conan movie is a classic of the sword and sorcery genre, but its original script from Oliver Stone didn’t resemble the final product at all. In fact, it barely resembled anything related to Conan. Stone’s Conan would have been set on a post-apocalyptic Earth, where the barbarian would do battle against a host of mutant pigs, insects, and hyenas. Not only that, but it would have also been just one part of a 12-film saga that would be modeled on the release schedule of the James Bond series.

The original producers were set to move ahead with Stone’s script with Stone co-directing alongside an up-and-coming special effects expert named Ridley Scott, but they were turned down by all of their prospects. With no co-director and a movie that would likely be too ambitious to ever actually get finished, they sold the rights to producer Dino De Laurentiis, who helped bring in Milius.

9. BARACK OBAMA IS A FAN (AND WAS TURNED INTO A BARBARIAN HIMSELF).

When President Barack Obama sent out a mass email in 2015 to the members of Organizing for Action, he was looking to get people to offer up stories about how they got involved within their community—their origin stories, if you will. In this mass email, the former Commander-in-Chief detailed his own origin, with a shout out to a certain barbarian:

“I grew up loving comic books. Back in the day, I was pretty into Conan the Barbarian and Spiderman.

Anyone who reads comics can tell you, every main character has an origin story—the fateful and usually unexpected sequence of events that made them who they are.”

This bit of trivia was first made public in 2008 in a Daily Telegraph article on 50 facts about the president. That led to Devil’s Due Publishing immortalizing the POTUS in the 2009 comic series Barack the Barbarian, which had him decked out in his signature loincloth doing battle against everyone from Sarah Palin to Dick Cheney.

10. J.R.R. TOLKIEN WAS ALSO A CONAN DEVOTEE.

The father of 20th century fantasy may always be J.R.R. Tolkien, but Howard is a close second in many fans' eyes. Though Tolkien’s work has found its way into more scholarly literary circles, Howard’s can sometimes get categorized as low-brow. Quality recognizes quality, however, and during a conversation with Tolkien, writer L. Sprague de Camp—who himself edited and touched-up numerous Conan stories—said The Lord of the Rings author admitted that he “rather liked” Howard’s Conan stories during a conversation with him. He didn’t expand upon it, nor was de Camp sure which Conan tale he actually read (though it was likely “Shadows in the Moonlight”), but the seal of approval from Tolkien himself goes a long way toward validation.

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