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14 Things You Might Not Know About Nineteen Eighty-Four

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George Orwell’s 1949 novel Nineteen Eighty-Four has given us a whole slew of shorthand phrases for dystopian or oppressive governments and surveillance, but even if you’ve already read about Winston Smith’s struggle against Big Brother, there are a few facts, stories, and theories about the novel that are worth a closer look.

1. IT NEARLY WASN’T CALLED NINETEEN EIGHTY-FOUR.  

In the year leading up to its publication, Orwell vocalized his indecision over what to call his novel. Before ultimately settling on Nineteen Eighty-Four, Orwell took a long look at the title The Last Man in Europe

2. HE ALSO HAD TROUBLE DECIDING IN WHAT YEAR THE STORY WOULD BE SET.

Before assigning his fearful prognostications to the year 1984, Orwell tried out 1980 and 1982. 

3. BEFORE CRITICIZING PROPAGANDA IN NINETEEN EIGHTY-FOUR, ORWELL WORKED AS A PROPAGANDIST. 

During World War II, Orwell served as a television producer at the British Broadcasting Corporation. His role with the BBC Empire Service involved creating and supervising programming that the nation would feed to Indian networks to encourage a pro-Allies sentiment and spark volunteering. 

4. THE AUTHOR MODELED ROOM 101 AFTER AN OFFICE AT THE BBC. 

Nineteen Eighty-Four’s most horrifying setting is Room 101, the Ministry of Love’s torture chamber in which victims are exposed to their worst nightmares. What readers might not know is that Orwell modeled the chilling locale on an actual room. 

As a propagandist, Orwell knew that much of what the BBC said had to be approved by the Ministry of Information, probably in the BBC Broadcasting House's Room 101. He probably drew the name of his nightmare room from there. Curious about what the dreadful room looked like? The room has since been demolished, but in 2003 artist Rachel Whiteread created a plaster cast of the room

5. ORWELL WAS BEING WATCHED WHILE HE WROTE NINETEEN EIGHTY-FOUR. 

Twelve years before he published Nineteen Eighty-Four, Orwell released the nonfiction piece The Road to Wigan Pier, an exploration of poverty and class oppression in England during the 1930s. Thanks to the investigative research he had conducted for Wigan Pier, which included the documentation of labor conditions in coal mines, and for the book’s pro-Socialist inclinations, Orwell was placed on a watch list by the government’s Special Branch and kept under tight surveillance for over a decade. His official file noted Orwell’s "advanced communist views" and that he "dresses in a bohemian fashion."

6. BIG BROTHER’S REGIME BORROWED PRACTICES FROM WORLD GOVERNMENTS. 

Orwell didn’t limit his sights to a single tyrannical power when designing the oppressive regime showcased in Nineteen Eighty-Four. The author borrowed a number of elements from the Soviet Union, including the "2 + 2 = 5" slogan from the so-called "five-year plan" for national development starting in 1928, while the NKVD police force provided the model for most of the Thought Police and Ministry of Love’s activity. Additionally, Nineteen Eighty-Four’s treatment of Thought Crimes resembled how the Special Higher Police, a special Japanese policing service during World War II, condemned unpatriotic thoughts during their self-styled "thought war."

7. JULIA IS BELIEVED TO BE BASED ON ORWELL’S SECOND WIFE. 

Many scholars have speculated that Julia, Nineteen Eighty-Four’s female lead and romantic interest to protagonist Winston, was modeled after Orwell’s second wife, Sonia Brownell. The comparison might not have been all that flattering, though. Orwell describes Julia as a "rebel from the waist downwards" and ultimately has Winston betray her to aid his own liberation. 

8. ORWELL WROTE THE BOOK WHILE STRUGGLING WITH TUBERCULOSIS. 

While most of us would use the opportunity of a mild cold to take a week off from work, Orwell did not let a 1947 bout with tuberculosis shift his focus away from his latest novel. It wasn’t until after he had finished Nineteen Eighty-Four, two years after his initial diagnosis, that he sought proper treatment for the disease. 

9. THE BOOK ONCE HELD THE RECORD FOR MOST TRANSLATIONS. 

By 1989, four decades after its publication, Nineteen Eighty-Four and Animal Farm had both been translated into 65 languages, a record for a pair of books by a single author. 

10. ONE OF THESE TRANSLATIONS DIDN’T "GET" THE OPENING LINE. 

Although it’s common for a text to undergo changes during translations, the original Italian version of Nineteen Eighty-Four did quite a number on the ominous tone leavened by the book’s famous opening line: "It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen." 

An unnamed translator altered the sentence to read, "…and the clocks were striking one," ostensibly unaware that Orwell had intentionally included an hour not present on most analog clocks. As 24-hour clocks were more common in Italy than in other parts of the world, the translator apparently saw no special value to Orwell’s original hour.

11. ORWELL NEARLY DROWNED WHILE WORKING ON THE NOVEL. 

Much of the writing of Nineteen Eighty-Four was done in Jura, Scotland, where Orwell found himself to be most productive. Even in this setting, he was hardly exempt from bouts of procrastination—some of which were particularly disastrous. Taking a break from his writing one day in the summer of 1947, Orwell led his son, niece, and nephew on a boating expedition across the nearby Gulf of Corryvreckan. During the trip, the family’s dinghy capsized unexpectedly, tossing the lot of them overboard without life jackets. Luckily, all four survived, but the event was hardly helpful to Orwell’s already delicate medical state. 

12. NINETEEN EIGHTY-FOUR IS ALREADY IN THE PUBLIC DOMAIN IN SOME COUNTRIES. 

Orwell’s novel is currently in the public domain in Canada, Australia, Argentina, South Africa, and Oman. The book will become public domain in the 28 nations of the European Union, as well as in Russia, as of 2021, and will be so in the United States in 2044. 

13. THE BOOK IS A FAVORITE NOVEL OF MANY FAMOUS FANS.

Stephen King, David Bowie, Mel Gibson, and Game of Thrones star Kit Harington have all listed the novel as or among their favorite books of all time. 

14. ORWELL DIED ONLY SEVEN MONTHS AFTER NINETEEN EIGHTY-FOUR WAS PUBLISHED. 

Although Orwell had seen success as a broadcaster, journalist, nonfiction writer, and as the author of Animal Farm, he unfortunately never got to witness the incredible influence that his most popular piece would have on the world. Orwell died on January 21, 1950, due to complications from tuberculosis.

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Sagar.jadhav01, Wikimedia Commons // ;CC BY-SA 4.0
New 'Eye Language' Lets Paralyzed People Communicate More Easily
Sagar.jadhav01, Wikimedia Commons // ;CC BY-SA 4.0
Sagar.jadhav01, Wikimedia Commons // ;CC BY-SA 4.0

The invention of sign language proved you don't need to vocalize to use complex language face to face. Now, a group of designers has shown that you don't even need control of your hands: Their new type of language for paralyzed people relies entirely on the eyes.

As AdAge reports, "Blink to Speak" was created by the design agency TBWA/India for the NeuroGen Brain & Spine Institute and the Asha Ek Hope Foundation. The language takes advantage of one of the few motor functions many paralyzed people have at their disposal: eye movement. Designers had a limited number of moves to work with—looking up, down, left, or right; closing one or both eyes—but they figured out how to use these building blocks to create a sophisticated way to get information across. The final product consists of eight alphabets and messages like "get doctor" and "entertainment" meant to facilitate communication between patients and caregivers.

Inside of a language book.
Sagar.jadhav01, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 4.0

This isn't the only tool that allows paralyzed people to "speak" through facial movements, but unlike most other options currently available, Blink to Speak doesn't require any expensive technology. The project's potential impact on the lives of people with paralysis earned it the Health Grand Prix for Good at the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity earlier in June.

The groups behind Blink to Speak have produced thousands of print copies of the language guide and have made it available online as an ebook. To learn the language yourself or share it with someone you know, you can download it for free here.

[h/t AdAge]

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How Bats Protect Rare Books at This Portuguese Library
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iStock

Visit the Joanina Library at the University of Coimbra in Portugal at night and you might think the building has a bat problem. It's true that common pipistrelle bats live there, occupying the space behind the bookshelves by day and swooping beneath the arched ceilings and in and out of windows once the sun goes down, but they're not a problem. As Smithsonian reports, the bats play a vital role in preserving the institution's manuscripts, so librarians are in no hurry to get rid of them.

The bats that live in the library don't damage the books and, because they're nocturnal, they usually don't bother the human guests. The much bigger danger to the collection is the insect population. Many bug species are known to gnaw on paper, which could be disastrous for the library's rare items that date from before the 19th century. The bats act as a natural form of pest control: At night, they feast on the insects that would otherwise feast on library books.

The Joanina Library is famous for being one of the most architecturally stunning libraries on earth. It was constructed before 1725, but when exactly the bats arrived is unknown. Librarians can say for sure they've been flapping around the halls since at least the 1800s.

Though bats have no reason to go after the materials, there is one threat they pose to the interior: falling feces. Librarians protect against this by covering their 18th-century tables with fabric made from animal skin at night and cleaning the floors of guano every morning.

[h/t Smithsonian]

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