12 Facts About Auntie Anne's Pretzels

23kelly, Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
23kelly, Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

The buttery, hand-rolled soft pretzels at Auntie Anne's are a food-court favorite, but here are some not-so-well-known facts about the pretzel chain, which has been around since 1988.

1. AUNTIE ANNE WAS NOT A GERMAN BAKER, REGARDLESS OF WHAT THE INTERNET SAYS.

Robyn Lee, Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

There’s a rumor floating around that Auntie Anne’s name is Anne Gerschwitz and that she was a renowned baker in Hannover, Germany, who fled to Philadelphia after World War II started. This is not true.

2. THE REAL AUNTIE ANNE WAS BORN INTO AN AMISH FAMILY.

"Like, horse-and-buggy Amish," Anne Beiler said of her parents. When she was 3, her family became Amish Mennonite—meaning they could have a car and electricity for basic needs—and she grew up on a small farm with her seven brothers and sisters in Lancaster County, Penn.

3. ANNE ONLY HAD AN 8TH GRADE EDUCATION.

"In the Amish culture, you go through 8th grade and then you quit school," Anne explained last year. "I just wanted to get married and have a family like my mom and dad did." She married at age 19, and much later, at 50, she went back and got her GED.

4. SHE HAD JUST $25 TO HER NAME WHEN SHE MOVED BACK TO PENNSYLVANIA.

According to her biography, Beiler, her husband Jonas, and her two daughters had no plan for when they moved from Texas—which they'd called home since early in their marriage—back to Pennsylvania in 1987. "Everything we owned was in that truck!" she wrote in Twist of Faith. "I was 39 years old, without life insurance policies or a plan for retirement. In the way of cash, after taking out the money we would need for gas and meals on our journey, we had an astronomical $25 left."

5. THE NAME AUNTIE ANNE'S WAS A NO-BRAINER.

Anne had 30 nieces and nephews, after all.

6. AUNTIE ANNE'S WAS STARTED WITH A $6000 INVESTMENT.

In 1988, Anne bought a storefront at a farmer’s market in Downingtown, Penn., that had been selling pretzels and ice cream. The set-up with the ovens and mixers was there; she just needed to perfect the recipe.

7. THE FIRST "TRAVEL LOCATION" WAS IN ANOTHER "PENN."

While you’ve probably visited an Auntie Anne’s at travel hubs like airport terminals and train stations, the first storefront at a train station was at New York’s Penn Station in June 1995. The next month, they went international, starting with Jakarta, Indonesia.

8. SHAQ IS A BIG FAN.

The former NBA all-star’s franchise group, O’Neal Enterprises, signed on for multiple storefronts in Buffalo, N.Y., and the Detroit area.

9. THE BEILERS RETIRED FROM THE PRETZEL BUSINESS TO BUILD A COMMUNITY COUNSELING CENTER.

Anne and Jonas Beiler, YouTube

In 2005, Anne and Jonas sold the company to his second cousin, Sam Beiler (who was a long-time employee), and used some of their fortune to build a new home for the Family Resource and Counseling Center in Lancaster, Penn., which Jonas had founded in 1992.

10. ODDLY, THE RELIGIOUS BEILERS DID NOT ADD THE HALO TO THE AUNTIE ANNE'S LOGO.

Anne and Jonas Beiler were both raised Mennonite, and in her book Twist of Faith, Anne talks about how God helped her through a family tragedy and helped her build Auntie Anne’s. But the halo over the pretzel in the company’s logo was introduced in 2006 after Sam Beiler initiated a redesign and rebranding.

11. THERE ARE WAY MORE TOPPING OPTIONS THAT CINNAMON AND SUGAR.

One of the most popular pretzels Auntie Anne’s sells in Singapore is seaweed-flavored. The Saudi Arabia location comes with dates, and the U.K. offers a banana pretzel.

12. AUNTIE ANNE'S HAS PRETZEL-MAKING CONTESTS AT THEIR CONVENTIONS.

And their employees are fast! This defending champion can roll a pretzel in 3.5 seconds.

Winner of Reynolds Wrap Contest Will Get Paid $10,000 to Sample the Country's Best BBQ

iStock/bhofack2
iStock/bhofack2

Which American city has the best barbecue is the root of one of the country's oldest culinary debates. As Thrillist reports, Reynolds Wraps is looking for one unbiased individual to travel the United States sampling barbecue ribs to determine which location makes them best—and the aluminum foil brand will pay them $10,000 for their trouble.

The winner of the 2019 Reynolds Wrap contest will take a two-week trip to "some of the most notorious BBQ cities," which last year included Nashville, Memphis, Kansas City, Dallas, and Austin. As Chief Grilling Officer, the smoked meat connoisseur will be tasked with identifying the best barbecue ribs in America, with Reynolds providing travel, lodging, and a $10,000 stipend for them and a guest to make the journey as smooth as possible. In return, the company asks that the CGO share grilling tips, techniques, and photos of their feasts to its website and social channels.

According to Reynolds Wrap, the position is perfect for anyone who doesn't mind "being paid to taste test some of the most delicious BBQ ribs across the country, posting envy-inducing pictures of your food and falling asleep every night dreaming about your next rack of ribs." Anyone can apply by submitting a photo of themselves grilling their favorite recipe along with 100 words pitching themselves for the job to careers@ReynoldsWrapCGO.com. The application deadline is June 19 and the barbecue tour starts sometime in August.

If you're not selected the contest winner, that shouldn't stop you from planning your own barbecue-themed road trip this summer. Here are some of the best barbecue cities in the country and where to eat in each one.

[h/t Thrillist]

8 Things You Might Not Know About LongHorn Steakhouse

Mike Mozart, Flickr // CC BY 2.0
Mike Mozart, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

Since its founding in 1981, LongHorn Steakhouse has become a familiar destination for those seeking sirloins and strip steaks. With more than 500 restaurants across the country and a 5 percent total sales growth in 2018 [PDF], LongHorn has definitely branded itself as a cut above in the steakhouse market. Dig into these facts about the dinner chain.

1. The original LongHorn location was once an adult bookstore.

George McKerrow Jr., a part-time bartender, opened the first LongHorn Steaks Restaurant & Saloon in Atlanta in August 1981. Before remodeling the building as a restaurant, though, it was an x-rated video- and bookstore. McKerrow added tablecloths, a jukebox, and bumper stickers to the walls, but he kept the back-lit booths that were once used for watching short peepshow videos.

2. LongHorn almost never got off the ground.

After LongHorn opened, it had a rough time taking off. "I had quit my previous job, fronted a lot of my own money, had a young daughter, and I was spending my days building that restaurant, literally, with my own two hands," McKerrow told The Atlantan in 2018. At the end of the first month, LongHorn was serving just a handful of meals a day, with McKerrow cooking, waiting tables, and washing the dishes.

3. A snowstorm saved the restaurant.

By January 1982, McKerrow was weeks away from shutting down LongHorn. But then one night, it started to snow—something that is a real rarity in Atlanta (and that particular storm is still known as the Snow Jam of '82). Drivers soon abandoned their cars on the roads, and LongHorn became a shelter from the freak blizzard. "We pulled a sign out front that said 'Drinks $1 While It Snows,'" Dave George, a former president of LongHorn Steakhouse told AirTran Magazine in 2006. "So all these people forced to pull over walked in 'til they filled the place up. And over the storm's three days, the steaks plus the genuinely friendly atmosphere surprised people, generating loyalty." By springtime, word-of-mouth had gotten LongHorn off the ground.

4. LongHorn really is all about the meat.

A slab of steak on a white plate with a knife
Yelp Inc, Flickr // CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

It was McKerrow's passion for grilling and dream of serving the perfect steak that led him to open the restaurant. Today, menus revolve around including ribeyes, T-bones, their signature porterhouse, a slow-roasted prime rib, and Flo's Filet, which LongHorn says was named for a server who loved that particular cut.

5. McKerrow didn't stop with LongHorn.

After the success of LongHorn, McKerrow expanded his steakhouse empire by opening Capital Grille. In 2002, he teamed up with Ted Turner to launch Ted's Montana Grill, which he is still the president and CEO of today.

6. Employees must complete extensive training to become a LongHorn Grill Master.

Every LongHorn location has two or three employees who have completed the training to be considered "Grill Masters." Once these grill chefs are certifiably ready to tackle any meat order, the best of the best can compete in a company-wide "Steak Master" competition. During the yearly contest, multiple "grill-off" rounds narrow 5000 Grill Masters down to seven for the final showdown. If you live near Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, congratulations—your ribeye might have been seared by 2018 reigning champion Michelle Cerveney.

7. LongHorn has a grill hotline for holiday weekends.

To take some of the pressure off family grill masters during the Fourth of July, LongHorn launched a call-in helpline to answer anyone's burning questions about the art of preparing dinner over flames in 2013. Called the Grill Us Hotline, the program put 25 Grill Masters on call during the evenings of the holiday weekend. The hotline has since continued and been expanded to cover Memorial Day weekend as well.

8. On the web, LongHorn is in an imagined relationship with Denny's.

In one of the more bizarre corners of the internet exists a community of users, especially on blogging site Tumblr, that create anthropomorphized accounts for various restaurant brands. In June 2013, two months after Denny's launched their official Tumblr account, an unofficial Tumblr was created for LongHorn Steakhouse. Whoever ran the site, which has since been deleted, began making references to being in love with Denny's. As things tend to do on the internet, the idea took off and resulted in a community of users who spent their time shipping "Denhouse."

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