12 Fun Facts About Pugs

iStock/ClarkandCompany
iStock/ClarkandCompany

These wrinkly-faced dogs have an adorably rich history. In honor of National Pug Day, read up on essential facts for any pug fanatic.    

1. THEY'RE AN ANCIENT BREED.


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Because the pug lineage stretches so far back, their early history is a little murky. Most believe that the breed originated in China and existed before 400 BCE and were called (or at least closely related to a breed called) “lo-sze.” Buddhist monks kept the dogs as pets in Tibetan monasteries.

2. THEY WERE TREATED LIKE ROYALTY.

Emperors of China kept pugs as lapdogs and treated them to all the luxuries of royal life. Sometimes the pampered pooches were given their own mini palaces and guards.  

3. A GROUP OF PUGS IS CALLED A GRUMBLE


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In Holland, the pug is called a mopshond, which comes from the Dutch for “to grumble.” 

4. THE BREED PROBABLY GETS ITS NAME FROM A MONKEY.

Marmosets were kept as pets in the early 18th century and were called pugs. The name made the jump to the dog because the two animals shared similar facial features. 

5. THE PUG IS THE OFFICIAL BREED OF THE HOUSE OF ORANGE.


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In 1572, the Dutch were in the midst of the Eighty Years' War, a protracted struggle against the Spanish. The Prince of Orange, William the Silent, led the Dutch forces into battle. According to Dutch legend, while the prince was sleeping in his tent one night, Spanish assassins lurked just outside. Luckily, William’s pug, Pompey, was there to bark wildly and jump on his owner’s face. The Prince woke up and had his would-be assassins apprehended. Because of this, the pug was considered the official dog of the House of Orange. The effigy of Prince William I above his tomb also features Pompey at his feet (although weirdly, that dog doesn’t have a flat face, leading some to believe that it was a different breed).

Later, when Prince William III came to England to rule with his wife Mary II, he brought his pugs, who wore little orange ribbons to their master’s 1689 coronation. 

6. THE PERFECT PUG TAIL HAS TWO CURLS.

Pugs are known for their curly tails that curve up towards their bodies. According to the AKC, “the double curl is perfection.” 

7. THERE'S A PUG WITH AN MBA.

In 2009, Chester Ludlow the pug received an online graduate degree from Rochville University. He submitted his resume to the website and paid around $500 for entry. A week later, he received his grades, degree, and a school window decal in the mail. Although he never attended a class, he received a 3.19 and he got an A in Finance. Chester may have been the first pug to get his degree.

It’s too bad Rochville University isn't accredited. The whole thing was a stunt pulled by a website called GetEducated.com. The website reviews online colleges to protect students from being duped by diploma mill fraud. So while Chester the pug has a diploma, you won’t see him getting a job very soon (unless that job is acting in cute commercials). 

8. THERE WAS A SECRET ORGANIZATION NAMED AFTER THE DOG.

Around 1740, Roman Catholics formed a secret fraternal group called the Order of the Pug. The Pope forbad Catholics from joining the Freemasons, so this group formed as a replacement. They chose the pug as their symbol because the dogs were loyal and trustworthy. The Grand Master was a man, but each division of the group had two “Big Pugs” that were always one male and one female. 

To join, members were expected to prove their devotion by kissing the rear of the Grand Pug under his tail (luckily, the Grand Pug was porcelain). Other wacky habits included wearing dog collars, scratching at the lodge door for entry, and barking loudly. 

This outcome probably wasn’t the result anyone was expecting from the freemason ban, so this new, stranger group got banned in several regions, until ultimately fizzling out. Probably due to a lack of people willing to kiss a pug’s posterior.  

9. JOSEPHINE BONAPARTE'S PUG DIDN'T MESS AROUND.


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Napoleon’s wife Josephine had a pet pug named Fortuné that she loved so much that she refused to let the dog sleep anywhere but in her bed. It’s rumored that when Napoleon entered the bed with his new wife for the first time, her pug bit him on the leg. 

10. THEY'VE GOT ROYAL CONNECTIONS IN THE UK, TOO.

Long before Queen Elizabeth II met her first corgi, Queen Victoria was the top British dog fancier, and she loved pugs. Victoria was such a dog lover that she also banned the practice of cropping ears, enabling pug owners to enjoy their pups’ velvety ears in all their glory.

11. THEIR SHORT NOSES CAUSE SOME TROUBLE.


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Pugs are brachycephalic, meaning their noses are pushed in more than other dogs. While cute, these smushed faces can lead to some breathing problems. Their facial structure makes it difficult to take long and deep breaths, which is why you might hear a pug snuffling while running around. The dogs are still very energetic, but they might not be the best swimmers and may have trouble on airplanes

12. PUGS ARE MADE TO BE COMPANIONS.

Pugs are excellent pets because of their adaptable personality. Whether you like to stay at home or enjoy the outdoors, the little dogs will be up for anything. Bred to be companions, their favorite place is right by your side.

An earlier version of this article ran in 2015.

100 Dachshunds Competed in Cincinnati’s Annual ‘Running of the Wieners’

NORRIE3699/iStock via Getty Images
NORRIE3699/iStock via Getty Images

Every year, to kick off Cincinnati’s Oktoberfest Zinzinnati, 100 dachshunds compete in heats to decide who the fastest dachshund in the Midwest is. This year marks the 43rd annual Oktoberfest—one of the biggest Oktoberfest celebrations outside of Germany (more than 500,000 people attend the three-day event).

On the afternoon of Thursday, September 19, 100 wiener dogs (and their owners and handlers) gathered in downtown Cincinnati for the 2019 "Running of the Wieners." The dogs, dressed in hot dog costumes, ran 10 heats, which lasted 75 feet or five seconds each. The winner of each heat advanced to the final round, where the top three finishers were decided.

Maple, a long-haired, one-year-old dachshund, ran his way into first place—and into our hearts.

Maple’s owner, Jake Sander, told WCPO that Maple is one of five dachshunds in the family, and that he learned to run fast by chasing his brother around. Leo and Bucky, two other doxies, placed second and third, respectively.

Besides the Running of the Wieners, Zinzinnati also hosts the World’s Largest Chicken Dance. However, the wiener dogs are more fun to watch.

Photographer Captures Polka-Dotted Zebra Foal in Kenya

Frank Liu
Frank Liu

Zebras are known for their eye-catching patterns, but this polka-dotted foal recently photographed in Kenya's Masai Mara National Reserve really stands out from the herd. As National Geographic reports, the zebra baby likely has pseudomelanism, a rare pigment condition that's been observed in the wild just a handful of times.

Nature photographer Frank Liu saw the zebra foal while looking for rhinos in the savannah wilderness preserve. After initially confusing the specimen for a different type of animal, he realized upon closer inspection that it was actually a plains zebra born with spots instead of stripes. The newborn foal was named Tira after the Maasai guide Antony Tira who first pointed him out.

Zebra foal with spots walking with mother.
Frank Liu

Zebra foal with spots.
Frank Liu

A typical zebra pattern is the result of pigment cells called melanocytes, which are responsible for the black base coat, and melanin, which gives the animal its white stripes. (So if you've ever wondered if zebras are white with black stripes or black with white stripes, the answer is the latter). In Tira and other zebras with pseudomelanism, the melanocytes are fully expressed, but a genetic mutation causes the melanin to appear as dots rather than unbroken stripes.


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Though rare, this isn't the only time a zebra with pseudomelanism has been documented in nature. Pseudomelanistic zebras have also been spotted in Botswana’s Okavango Delta, but Liu believes this could be the first time one was found in the Masai Mara preserve.

Zebra stripes aren't just for decoration. The distinct pattern may act as camouflage, bug repellant, and a built-in temperature regulation system. Without these evolutionary benefits, Tira has a lower chance of making it to adulthood: Pseudomelanistic zebra adults are rarely observed for this reason. But as Liu's photographs show, the foal has the protection and acceptance of his herd on his side.

[h/t National Geographic]

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