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Jim Bachor, Facebook

One Artist Solves the Pothole Problem With Delightful Ice Cream Mosaics

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Jim Bachor, Facebook

In a new project called "Street Treats," Chicago artist Jim Bachor took to the streets and repaired potholes with beautiful mosaics of ice cream. Just in time for summer, Chicago and Jyväskylä, Finland found their pothole problems replaced with frosty treats. 

This is not Bachor's first time installing mosaics into potholes: his previous work—which included mosaics of flowers, serial numbers and pretty renderings of the word "pothole"—led him to start a Kickstarter to ask for funding for this year's additions (since he obviously can't sell this public art for profit). The artist explained on the crowdfunding site that the goal is to "create mosaics that speak of modern things in an ancient voice," and that each pothole piece costs about $100. He successfully raised over $4,600, so Chicago residents can look forward to quite a few extra colorfully filled holes.

If you live in Chicago or Jyväskylä (where Bachor is participating in their "end of winter" festival), be sure to keep your eyes peeled for these subtle works of art. 

[h/t: LaughingSquid.com]

Images courtesy of Jim Bachor, Facebook

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Courtesy Chronicle Books
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Design
Inside This Pop-Up Book Are a Planetarium, a Speaker, a Decoder Ring, and More
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Courtesy Chronicle Books

Designer Kelli Anderson's new book is for more than just reading. This Book Is a Planetarium is really a collection of paper gadgets. With each thick, card stock page you turn, another surprise pops out.

"This book concisely explains—and actively demonstrates with six functional pop-up paper contraptions—the science at play in our everyday world," the book's back cover explains. It turns out, there's a whole lot you can do with a few pieces of paper and a little bit of imagination.

A book is open to reveal a spiralgraph inside.
Courtesy Chronicle Books

There's the eponymous planetarium, a paper dome that you can use with your cell phone's flashlight to project constellations onto the ceiling. There's a conical speaker, which you can use to amplify a smaller music player. There's a spiralgraph you can use to make geometric designs. There's a basic cipher you can use to encode and decode secret messages, and on its reverse side, a calendar. There's a stringed musical instrument you can play on. All are miniature, functional machines that can expand your perceptions of what a simple piece of paper can become.

The cover of This Book Is a Planetarium
Courtesy Chronicle Books
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Noriyuki Saitoh
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Art
Japanese Artist Crafts Intricate Insects Using Bamboo
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Noriyuki Saitoh

Not everyone finds insects beautiful. Some people think of them as scary, disturbing, or downright disgusting. But when Japanese artist Noriyuki Saitoh looks at a discarded cicada shell or a feeding praying mantis, he sees inspiration for his next creation.

Saitoh’s sculptures, spotted over at Colossal, are crafted by hand from bamboo. He uses the natural material to make some incredibly lifelike pieces. In one example, three wasps perch on a piece of honeycomb. In another, two mating dragonflies create a heart shape with their abdomens.

The figures he creates aren’t meant to be exact replicas of real insects. Rather, Saitoh starts his process with a list of dimensions and allows room for creativity when fine-tuning the appearances. The sense of movement and level of detail he puts into each sculpture is what makes them look so convincing.

You can browse the artist’s work on his website or follow him on social media for more stunning samples from his portfolio.

Bamboo insect.

Bamboo insect.

Bamboo insect.

Bamboo insect.

Bamboo insect.

Bamboo insect.

[h/t Colossal]

All images courtesy of Noriyuki Saitoh.

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