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The New Hamburglar Is Here to Tell You McDonald's Is Hip

McDonald's
McDonald's

In an effort to stay relevant, McDonald's has been on a misguided marketing rampage, rebranding their beloved characters. After vest-ifying Ronald McDonald, they turned their sights on the poor Hamburglar. No longer a cartoon, the character's getup resembles a last-minute Halloween costume thrown together by a college kid.

The new burger thief sports a trench coat, hamburger tie, fedora, and flashy red kicks. It's hard to tell from the picture, but it looks like he might also be wearing some ill-fitting cargo pants.

The new rumpled mascot may lack the spunky charm of the original, but he has gained... a child? In his first debut since 2002, the Hamburglar made a teasing appearance in a new McDonald's commercial on Twitter:

The gap-toothed thief has grown a lot since his animated years—and has acquired a family. Could it be a cover? That's pretty dastardly, even for the Hamburglar. 

There's no word yet if the other McDonald's mascots will fall to the same fate as their companions, but I wouldn't be surprised to see Grimace rocking some shutter shades and a mustache. 

[h/t: Mashable.com]

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Why Can Parrots Talk and Other Birds Can't?
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If you've ever seen a pirate movie (or had the privilege of listening to this avian-fronted metal band), you're aware that parrots have the gift of human-sounding gab. Their brains—not their beaks—might be behind the birds' ability to produce mock-human voices, the Sci Show's latest video explains below.

While parrots do have articulate tongues, they also appear to be hardwired to mimic other species, and to create new vocalizations. The only other birds that are capable of vocal learning are hummingbirds and songbirds. While examining the brains of these avians, researchers noted that their brains contain clusters of neurons, which they've dubbed song nuclei. Since other birds don't possess song nuclei, they think that these structures probably play a key role in vocal learning.

Parrots might be better at mimicry than hummingbirds and songbirds thanks to a variation in these neurons: a special shell layer that surrounds each one. Birds with larger shell regions appear to be better at imitating other creatures, although it's still unclear why.

Learn more about parrot speech below (after you're done jamming out to Hatebeak).

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