20 Facts About The Muppets (Featuring The Muppets!)

In this very special List Show, Kermit and Miss Piggy (and other surprise guests) helped Elliott Morgan run through Muppet history.

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A Custom Wheelchair Allowed This Brain-Injured Baby Raccoon to Walk Again

фотограф/iStock via Getty Images
фотограф/iStock via Getty Images

Animal prosthetics and wheelchairs allow dogs, cats, and even zoo animals with limited mobility to walk again, but wild animals with disabilities aren't usually as lucky. Vittles, a baby raccoon rescued in Arkansas, is the rare example of an animal that was severely injured in its natural habitat getting a second shot at life.

As Tribune Media Wire reports, Vittles came to wildlife rehab specialist Susan Curtis, who works closely with raccoons for the state of Arkansas, with a traumatic brain injury at just 8 weeks old. The cause of the trauma wasn't clear, but it was obvious that the raccoon wouldn't be able to survive on her own if returned to the wild.

Curtis partnered with the pet mobility gear company Walkin' Pets to get Vittles back on her feet. They built her a tiny custom wheelchair to give her balance and support as she learned to get around on her own. The video below shows Vittles using her legs and navigating spaces with help from the chair and guidance from her caretaker.

Vittles will likely never recover fully, but now that she's able to exercise her leg muscles, her chance at one day moving around independently is greater than it would have been otherwise. She now lives with her caretaker Susan and a 10-year old raccoon with cerebral palsy named Beetlejuice. After she's rehabilitated, the plan is to one day make her part of Arkansas's educational wildlife program.

[h/t Tribune Media Wire]

32 Facts About the Witness Protection Program

YouTube via Mental Floss
YouTube via Mental Floss

If you have information that could help prosecutors put criminals behind bars, but you think it might cost you your life, you’re in luck: The Federal Witness Protection Program can give you a new one. Since the 1970s, the government has been relocating witnesses with new names, new homes, and sometimes even new faces.

While it’s notoriously secretive, we’ve managed to uncover 32 facts about the business of giving sources a new lease—or nose—on life. Check them out in this all-new edition of The List Show with Mental Floss editor-in-chief Erin McCarthy.

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