CLOSE
Original image

This Trash Can/Vacuum Combo Makes Dustpans Obsolete

Original image

When I imagine hell, I think of an eternity of attempting to sweep tinier and tinier grains of dirt and grime off the floor into a dustpan using only a broom. No matter how vigorously I sweep those piles of household debris into the dustpan, there will always be that single line of grime left over, the unsweepable filth doomed to haunt my kitchen floor forever. 

Enter Bruno, a trash can that doubles as a vacuum to eliminate the need for dustpans. Just sweep everything right up to the edge of the trash can, and the compact little kitchen helper will do the rest. The integrated vacuum system activates when the broom comes close to the base of the trash can, sucking dirt up directly into the trash bag. It runs on batteries, and can run for 30 days per charge.  



Of course, you’ve got to buy Bruno’s custom-fitted trash bags, as well as deal with the very real possibility that some day your trash can may break—something that is a virtual impossibility with your average dumb trash receptacle. Such is the price of living in the future, where even your trash has an app of its own (in this case, one that will remind everyone in the house when it's trash day). 


Bruno may be a little more expensive than your average refuse bin, but the price of eliminating the sweep-sweep-dump-vacuum-sweep-again cycle of dustpan cleaning could be worth it. At least for those who haven't given up and pledged to live Pigpen-style. The high-tech dustbin is available on Kickstarter for $159.

[h/t: Co.Design]

All images courtesy Bruno.

Original image
Courtesy Chronicle Books
arrow
Design
Inside This Pop-Up Book Are a Planetarium, a Speaker, a Decoder Ring, and More
Original image
Courtesy Chronicle Books

Designer Kelli Anderson's new book is for more than just reading. This Book Is a Planetarium is really a collection of paper gadgets. With each thick, card stock page you turn, another surprise pops out.

"This book concisely explains—and actively demonstrates with six functional pop-up paper contraptions—the science at play in our everyday world," the book's back cover explains. It turns out, there's a whole lot you can do with a few pieces of paper and a little bit of imagination.

A book is open to reveal a spiralgraph inside.
Courtesy Chronicle Books

There's the eponymous planetarium, a paper dome that you can use with your cell phone's flashlight to project constellations onto the ceiling. There's a conical speaker, which you can use to amplify a smaller music player. There's a spiralgraph you can use to make geometric designs. There's a basic cipher you can use to encode and decode secret messages, and on its reverse side, a calendar. There's a stringed musical instrument you can play on. All are miniature, functional machines that can expand your perceptions of what a simple piece of paper can become.

The cover of This Book Is a Planetarium
Courtesy Chronicle Books
Original image
Ikea
arrow
Design
How IKEA Turned the Poäng Chair Into a Classic
Original image
Ikea

IKEA's Poäng chair looks as modern today as it did when it debuted in 1976. The U-shaped lounger has clean lines and a simple structure, and often evokes comparisons to Finnish designer Aalto’s famous “armchair 406.” Its design, however, is ultimately a true fusion of East and West, according to Co.Design.

In 2016, the Poäng celebrated its 40th birthday, and IKEA USA commemorated the occasion (and the 30 million-plus Poäng chairs they’ve sold over the years) by releasing two short videos about the armchair’s history and underlying design philosophy. Together, they tell the story of a fateful collaboration between Lars Engman, a young IKEA designer, and his co-worker, Noboru Nakamura.

Nakamura had initially come to IKEA to learn more about Scandinavian furniture. But the Japanese designer ended up imbuing the Poäng—which was initially called Poem—with his own distinct philosophy. He wanted to create a chair that swung “in an elegant way, which triggered me to imagine Poäng,” Nakamura recalled in a video interview. “That’s how I came up with a rocking chair.”

“A chair shouldn’t be a tool that binds and holds the sitter,” Nakamura explained. “It should rather be a tool that provides us with an emotional richness and creates an image where we let go of stress or frustration by swinging. Such movement in itself has meaning and value.”

Save for upholstery swaps, a 1992 name change, and a new-ish all-wooden frame that's easily flat-packed, the modern-day Poäng is still essentially the same product that customers have purchased and enjoyed for decades. Devotees of the chair can hear the full story by watching IKEA’s videos below—ideally, while swinging away at their desks.

[h/t Co. Design]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios