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A Brief History of Pro Sports Played in Empty Stadiums

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On Monday and Tuesday, the Orioles canceled their scheduled games at Camden Yards against the White Sox due to safety concerns related to the protests in Baltimore. But making up games over the course of the long and crowded MLB season schedule is difficult, and so, yesterday, the team announced an unusual solution—one that has never been used in the history of the game. Wednesday's game at Camden Yards will still be played, but no fans will be permitted to attend. That's right: The teams will play today in front of an empty stadium—intentionally.

According to a tweet from MLB's Official Historian John Thorn, this is the first time such a solution has been used to accommodate extenuating circumstances. But thanks to the wacky promotional tactics employed in the Minor Leagues, it's not the first zero-attendance game.

In July 2002, the Charleston RiverDogs—then a Class A affiliate of Tampa Bay (now a Yankees' affiliate owned by Bill Murray)—decided that the best way to attract people to their games was to not let anyone watch them. Or something. As part of the aptly-named “Nobody Night,” the gates to Joe Riley Stadium were padlocked with paying customers on the outside as the game got underway. And the fans loved it. “'Nobody Night' promotion a big hit,” touted USA Today.

"We're RiverDogs fans and could not pass up the opportunity to have truly terrible seats," 50-year-old Stephen Parker told the outlet. "I've had bad seats but this is ridiculous." He and Ute Appleby, 47, watched the first few innings through the outfield fence. "I've had much worse seats than this at Yankee Stadium," he said.

After five innings had passed, rendering the game official with a record-setting lack of attendance, fans were allowed inside to watch the remainder of the 4-2 RiverDogs’ loss; all the runs were scored before the gates were opened.

On the Major League level, today’s game will break the current record for lowest attendance (although that’s hardly the headline that should be coming out of Baltimore) set on September 28, 1882 when the Worcester Ruby Legs drew just six fans (they weren't very good).

Soccer Exception

Although it’s an aberration in American sports, banning fans from the game has happened repeatedly at international soccer matches as an extreme punishment.

Last October, the UEFA ordered CSKA Moscow to play three games in an empty stadium after a group of their fans threw flares on the pitch, displayed racist banners, and instigated fights with police at a game in Rome. In fact, it was the second time in just two months that Moscow fans were banned from the stadium for racist behavior. CSKA was barred from selling tickets to its fans for popular away matches at Manchester City and Bayern Munich and was slapped with a hefty fine.

In March, 2014, Japanese soccer team the Urawa Red Diamonds played in an empty stadium after fans hung a “Japanese only” banner in an entranceway during an earlier home game. After the photo of the banner went viral, the team banned 20 members of the offending group from future games, but J-League officials insisted on extending the ban to all fans, forcing the team to play for nobody.

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Pop Culture
The Simpsons's Classic Baseball Episode Gets the Mockumentary Treatment
Fox Sports, YouTube
Fox Sports, YouTube

Opinions vary widely about the continued existence of The Simpsons, which just began its 29th season. Some believe the show ran out of steam decades ago, while others see no reason why the satirical animated comedy can’t run forever.

Both sides will no doubt have something to say about the episode airing Sunday, October 22, which reframes the premise of the show’s classic “Homer at the Bat” installment from 1992 as a Ken Burns-style mockumentary titled Springfield of Dreams: The Legend of Homer Simpson.

As Mashable reports, “Homer at the Bat” saw Montgomery Burns launch his own baseball team and populate it with real major league players like Wade Boggs, Steve Sax, and Jose Canseco to dominate the competition. In the one-hour special, the players will discuss their (fictional) participation, along with interviews featuring Homer and other members of the animated cast.

It’s not clear how much of the special will break the fourth wall and go into the actual making of the episode, a backstory that involves guest star Ken Griffey Jr. getting increasingly frustrated recording his lines and Canseco’s wife objecting to a scene in which her husband's animated counterpart wakes up in bed with lecherous schoolteacher Edna Krabappel.

Morgan Spurlock (Super-Size Me) directed the special, which is slated to air on Fox at either 3 p.m. EST or 4:30 p.m. EST depending on NFL schedules in local markets. There will also be a new episode of The Simpsons—an annual Halloween-themed "Treehouse of Horror" installment—airing in its regular 8 p.m. time slot.

[h/t Mashable]

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Seattle Mariners Fans Are Going Crazy for These Crunchy Grasshopper Snacks
Great Big Story, Youtube
Great Big Story, Youtube

Seattle Mariners fans have more than warmed up to the newest, offbeat addition to the Safeco Field concessions menu: toasted grasshoppers covered in chili-lime salt.

The crunchy snack, which sells for $4 and comes packed in a small container, has only been available for less than a season but has already sold 300,000-plus orders to date. That's about 1000 pounds of grasshoppers. 

Frequenters of Seattle's popular Mexican restaurant Poquitos will know that this delicacy—which first started as a novelty item on its menu—has actually been available to the public for six years. But it wasn't until local chef Ethan Stowell was hired to give the Safeco Field menu a hip retooling that the salty bugs found new, fervent popularity at the ballpark. (Also on the Safeco menu: fried oysters drizzled in hot sauce.)

Great Big Story met up with Manny Arce, the executive chef of Poquitos and visionary behind this culinary home run, to discuss the popularity of these crunchy critters. You can watch the video interview below:

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