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8 Surprising Facts and Misconceptions About Recycling

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If you pat yourself on the back for just remembering to separate the recycling or haul that big blue bin to the curb each week, you're not alone. Despite the strides we appear to be making towards ecoconsciousness as a country, we have a long way to go in helping the Earth, as evidenced by our complicated relationship with recycling. These staggering facts about the most prevalent of the three Rs will make you pause the next time you throw anything away.

1. THE UNITED STATES'S RECYCLING RATE IS LOW—REALLY LOW.

The organization Recycle Across America is trying to change this with their Let's Recycle Right! campaign, which uses society-wide standardized labels for recycling bins to eliminate the confusion over what actually belongs in these receptacles. In fact, the organization's Executive Director, Mitch Hedlund, isn't even sure the recycling rate often quoted is an accurate one because there is so much junk mixed in with actual recyclables. "Currently, the U.S. recycling rate is at 34.5 percent and much of those materials are so highly contaminated with garbage that I'm not convinced that 34.5 percent is even accurate for actual 'recycled' material," she says. "If the U.S. gets the recycling number up to 75 percent, which we believe is completely possible once the confusion (over what to place in the bins) is removed, it will be the CO2 equivalent of removing 50 million cars from the roads each year in the U.S. and it will create 1.5 million permanent new jobs in the U.S. (net)."

2. PROPER RECYCLING RESULTS IN BIG MONETARY SAVINGS.

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While Hedlund admits the idea of providing one universal label clearly stating what should be placed in the bins is a simple one, it's making a serious impact on those who have jumped on the bandwagon. "Many schools are seeing dramatic increases in their recycling levels since using the society-wide standardized labels on their recycling bins," she says. "For instance, in the pilot program at Culver City schools in Los Angeles [County], their recycling levels doubled when they started using the standardized labels and the materials they were collecting in their recycling bins were so much less contaminated with garbage. They rolled out the labels at all of their schools. Another story, as a result of a donation from Kiehls (who makes a donation to Recycle Across America each April in the sum of $50,000), all of the schools in the San Diego Unified School District and San Diego County started using the standardized labels. San Diego Unified School District reduced their landfill hauling fees by about $200,000 (net) in the first year."

3. NO TWO RECYCLE HAULERS' RULES ARE CREATED EQUAL.

So what on Earth should you be putting in those bins? The message is still a bit confusing, as there's no industry-wide standard for recyclables, but the creation of a national alliance of haulers, processors, and non-profits is in the works. "There were unspoken rules by haulers and recycling processors before that said no caps on bottles," says Hedlund, citing an example of the complex recycling guidelines. "If caps are on bottles, the bottles will go to the landfill. Then many haulers realized that people keep putting caps on bottles and the processors discovered that the plastic the caps are made of is actually more valuable than the plastic material of the bottles they're made for. Now some haulers are deciding the caps should stay on bottles and they will create a technology to separate the two plastics during processing. But this isn't all haulers in the U.S. and therefore the messaging still isn't reaching the public in a unified way."

4. CLOTHING CAN BE RECYCLED, BUT IT RARELY IS.

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Unfortunately, most curbside haulers don't accept textiles, but thanks to DoSomething.org's Comeback Clothes campaign and their partner H&M, you can bring clothes that aren't worth donating to charity to one of H&M's retail stores and they'll make sure it heads to the right place—meaning, not a landfill. Hilary Gridley, Environmental Campaigns Specialist for DoSomething.org, says, "11.1 million tons of recyclable clothing, shoes, and textiles end up in landfills every year. We did the math and realized that's the equivalent of 70 billion t-shirts."

5. EIGHTY-FIVE PERCENT OF CLOTHING CAN BE RECYCLED.

Gridley explains what happens when items are processed through the Comeback Clothes campaign: "H&M works with a company called I:CO and the clothes are sorted into three different categories: re-wear, reuse, and recycling," she says. "So re-wear, clothes that can be re-worn and are in good enough condition, are sold as secondhand goods worldwide. Reuse, clothes that are no longer suitable for wearing, are converted into other products. They can be broken down into threads and remade into new clothes. And then recycle, clothes that are in terrible shape and there's nothing else to be done with them, those are turned into fibers that are used to make new products, like insulation for buildings."

6. ALUMINUM IS THE WORLDS MOST RECYCLED PACKAGING PRODUCT.

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Nearly 70 percent of aluminum cans are recycled internationally, according to Novelis, a leader in rolled aluminum products and recycled aluminum. It is infinitely recyclable, meaning it can be reused in a way completely different from what it was in its previous life, or recast into its original form.

7. THAT SODA CAN YOU'RE DRINKING FROM COULD FIND ITS WAY BACK TO YOU QUICKER THAN YOU THINK.

According to Novelis's research, an aluminum can that is recycled can be back on a grocery store shelf within 60 days. That's a seriously speedy turnaround.

8. SCRAP RECYCLING IS BIG BUSINESS.

While the words scrap recycling might have you humming the Sanford & Son theme song, it's far from being a "junkyard industry," says Kent Kiser, Assistant Vice President of Industry Communications for the Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries (ISRI). "In 2013, for instance, U.S. scrap recyclers processed more than 130 million tons of scrap materials, saving significant amounts of energy, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, preserving natural resources, and limiting the amount of material that would otherwise go to landfills. From that total, U.S. scrap recyclers exported almost 43 million metric tons of scrap commodities in 2013, helping the U.S. trade balance."

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Air Quality in American National Parks and Big Cities Is Roughly the Same
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National parks usually have more vegetation, wildlife, and open spaces than urban areas, but the two don't look much different when it comes to air quality. As City Lab reports, a new study published in Science Advances found that U.S. national parks and the nation's largest cities have comparable ozone levels.

For their research, scientists from Iowa State University and Cornell University looked at air pollution data collected over 24 years from 33 national parks and the 20 most populous metro areas in the U.S. Their results show that average ozone concentrations were "statistically indistinguishable" between the two groups from 1990 to 2014.

On their own, the statistics look grim for America's protected areas, but they're actually a sign that environmental protection measures are working. Prior to the 1990s, major cities had higher ozone concentrations than national parks. At the start of the decade, the federal government passed the Clean Air Act (CAA) Amendments in an effort to fight urban air pollution, and ozone levels have been declining ever since.

The average ozone in national parks did increase in the 1990s, but then in 1999 the EPA enacted the Regional Haze Rule, which specifically aims to improve air quality and visibility in national parks. Ozone levels in national parks are now back to the levels they were at in 1990.

Ground-level ozone doesn't just make America's national parks harder to see: It can also damage plants and make it difficult for human visitors to breathe. Vehicles, especially gas-guzzling trucks and SUVs, are some of the biggest producers of the pollutant.

[h/t City Lab]

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India's Supreme Court Demands That the Taj Mahal Be Restored or Demolished
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The Taj Mahal is one of the most recognizable monuments on Earth, but over the years it's started to look less like its old self. Smog and insect droppings are staining the once pure-white marble exterior an unseemly shade of yellow. Now, The Art Newspaper reports that India's Supreme Court has set an ultimatum: It's threatening to shut down or demolish the building if it's not restored to its former glory.

Agra, the town where the Taj Mahal is located, has a notorious pollution problem. Automobile traffic, factory smoke, and the open burning of municipal waste have all contributed to the landmark's increasing discoloration. Insects and acid rain also pose a threat to the facade, which is already crumbling away in some parts.

India's highest court now says the country's central government must seek foreign assistance to restore the UNESCO World Heritage Site if it's to remain open. Agra's state of Uttar Pradesh has taken some steps to reduce pollution in recent years, such us banning the burning of cow dung, which produces heavy brown carbon. In 2015, India's Supreme Court ordered all wood-burning crematoriums near the Taj Mahal to be swapped for electric ones.

But the measures haven't done enough to preserve the building. A committee led by the Indian Institute of Technology in Kanpu reportedly plans to investigate the exact sources of pollution in the area, a process that will take about four months. The Supreme Court plans check in on the status of site every day from July 31.

Air pollution isn't the only factor damaging the Taj Mahal. It was constructed near the Yamuna River in the 17th century, and as the water gradual dries up, the ground beneath the structure is shifting. If the trend continues it could lead to the building's total collapse.

[h/t The Art Newspaper]

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