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Annie Goetzinger/NBM Publishing
Annie Goetzinger/NBM Publishing

The Most Interesting Comics of the Week

Annie Goetzinger/NBM Publishing
Annie Goetzinger/NBM Publishing

Every week I write about the most interesting new comics hitting comic shops, bookstores, digital, and the web. Feel free to comment below if there's a comic you've read recently that you want to talk about or an upcoming comic that you'd like me to consider highlighting.

1. Girl in Dior

By Annie Goetzinger
NBM Publishing

Making its U.S. debut this past weekend at the MoCCA Arts Festival in New York City, Annie Goetzinger’s Girl in Dior is sure to be one of the best looking graphic novels of the year. It's an account of the rise of fashion designer Christian Dior and his revolutionary 1947 fashion show that introduced the so-called “New Look” to the world, a colorful and voluptuous departure from the boxy, drab and way too sensible post-WW II stylings of the day.

Goetzinger tells the story through the eyes of a fictional character named Clara who goes from chronicler to model to Dior confidante in the span of the book. While it is mostly historical fiction, it is also very much a vehicle for the artist to lovingly render and showcase Dior’s clothing designs in gorgeous pencil and watercolors, reminiscent of mid-century fashion illustration. Goetzinger has had a long career in French comics, debuting her first graphic novel, Casque d’or, back in 1977. She has since worked in costume design for the theater and editorial illustration for such French newspapers as Le Monde. Last year she became the first woman to win the prestigious Grand Prix bd Boum for Girl in Dior. This book will be, for most, the first her work is seen in the U.S. 

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2. The Crogan Adventures: Catfoot’s Vengeance

By Chris Schweizer
Oni Press

Chris Schweizer’s Crogan Adventures has one of the most enticing framing devices I’ve ever seen for a multi-book series. Schweizer first sold the idea for the book by creating an illustrated family tree showing members of the Crogan family dating back to the 1700s. There is a Crogan who ran with the Rough Riders, a Crogan who sailed with pirates, a Crogan who joined the foreign legion, a secret agent Crogan and more. Just seeing the faces and the period-specific garb gives you a hint of the type of story you’d get with each one. Schweizer aims to tell all their stories, dipping his toes in a variety of genres and settings, all full of the kind of pulpy historical adventure that has appealed to young boys for generations.

There have been multiple Crogan books since 2008’s original Crogan’s Vengeance, all illustrated in Schweizer's wonderfully fluid black and white brush ink style. Now, he and his publisher Oni Press, are rebranding the books as The Crogan Adventures and re-releasing them in full color. The first book in the new series is a colorized (and also re-lettered) version of the very first book, Crogan’s Vengeance, in which “Catfoot" Crogan gets kidnapped and is forced to join a pirate crew. Since many people (kids especially) tend to disregard black and white books, this is sure to be a good way to introduce these fun stories to a wider audience – especially considering how spectacular the coloring by Joey Weiser and Michele Chidester looks in this preview

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3. Frontier #7

By Jillian Tamaki
Youth in Decline


One of the best kept secrets in comics is Youth in Decline’s Frontier series, a quarterly, pamphlet-sized anthology comic sold primarily through mail-order. Each issue gives one artist (usually a fresh, up-and-coming voice in the art and comics world) free rein to tell any kind of story they want. The most recent issues have featured rising stars like Sam Alden and Emily Carroll and a future issue will be done by Michael DeForge. These names bring Frontier out of “up-and-coming” territory and into the world of “well-established-indie-stars.” That includes the contributor to issue #7—Jillian Tamaki—the highly regarded artist behind last year’s award-winning powerhouse of an all-ages graphic novel This One Summer.

Tamaki steps away from all-ages comics here (although to be fair, This One Summer deals with some very mature teenage themes itself) with a story called “SexCoven.” Told as if it was excerpted from a documentary, “SexCoven” begins in the 1990s with the legend of an mp3 file that only teenagers can hear and leads to present day and a commune of techies who met online, outgrew the ability to hear that mp3, and dropped out of society altogether. 

Readers of This One Summer will find a rougher, less delicate style of drawing from Tamaki here, but it is no less effective. Some of her page layouts, in particular, are wonderfully complicated and interesting.

You can order a copy of Frontier #6 at the Youth in Decline’s website.

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4. Bloodshot Reborn #1

By Jeff Lemire and Mico Suayan
Valiant


The gun-toting Bloodshot is up there on the list of most ‘90s comic book characters ever. First appearing back in 1992, he is an unstoppable killing machine with nano-computers in his blood that help him regenerate from any wound. His government handlers continuously implanted false memories in order to properly motivate him on each of his missions, leaving him unsure who he is and what is real. When Valiant Comics relaunched their long-defunct line of comics in 2012, Bloodshot was front and center with a cinematic and very bloody update to his story.

Valiant’s excellent first wave of relaunches is now making way for a second wave which was ushered in by the recent mini-series The Valiant written by Jeff Lemire and starring Bloodshot (among others). The events of that series left Bloodshot with the nannies—and his special abilities—removed from his body, leaving him a regular guy. Now, in Bloodshot Reborn—also written by Lemire—we see him trying to live a quiet life as a somewhat schlubby hotel maintenance man, still very much haunted by what he used to be. However, when someone dressed like Bloodshot goes on a shooting spree, the real Bloodshot needs to find a way to bring himself back into action.

Lemire is joined by Philippine artist Mico Suayan who has done a number of covers for various Valiant books in the past. Like any good Bloodshot artist, he brings a gruesome level of detail to the violence, but also a detailed realism to Lemire's solemn, inward-looking reflection on the nature of one’s self. This is a whole new start for Bloodshot and, while the Valiant relaunch is only a couple of years old, it is full of tightly wound continuity that can make it hard to jump into, but this second wave of books is looking to create such an entry point. 

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5. Drawn Onward

By Matt Madden
Retrofit Press


More than any other medium, comics make it easy for their audience to disrupt the narrative flow on their own—skipping ahead, flipping back, letting the eye jump from panel to panel out of order. Some writers try to take advantage of this by creating books that can ostensibly be read forward and backward—Grant Morrison and Frank Quitely played with this mirror-imagery a bit in The Multiversity: Pax Americana in mimicry of Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons' "Fearful Symmetry” issue of Watchmen

Cartoonist and comics educator Matt Madden has attempted, as the title Drawn Onward implies, a palindrome of a comic that is meant to be read both forward and backward. As you read forward, it tells the story of a young woman who is continuously accosted by a stranger on the subway. She quickly becomes obsessed with the man himself. After a double page kiss that spans the midpoint of the book, things change and now the woman is the one obsessed and finds her own advances being shunned. By the end, the woman (who is also the narrator) encourages you to go back and read it the story back to front and see the story play out with her being the seemingly crazy subway person.

There are a few layers to what Madden is doing here which encourage you to try to decipher the story: there are implications of a double suicide; he uses two different artistic styles to differentiate scenes between the woman at her drawing board and the subway scenes which seem to be drawn roughly to imply that they are her drawings, and lots of easter eggs like “Rorschach Ave” tipping its hat to the symmetry angle. Reading backwards is a stilted experience that requires a lot of instruction to the reader and seems nearly impossible to truly make the flow of the story coherent in both directions. (Do you read the panels backwards as you would with manga? Just the pages?) In this case, it doesn’t really add to the symmetry you already experience by reading forward, but there is an intriguing puzzle to Madden’s story that will make you flip back and forth trying to work it out.

You can order a copy from Retrofit’s store. It’s also available digitally through Comixology.

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20 Marvel Cinematic Universe Movie Locations You Can Visit in Real Life
Marvel Studios
Marvel Studios

While most of Marvel Cinematic Universe is magically brought to life on sound stages, the box office-busting superhero movie franchise also makes use of real-world locations around the world to bring its stories to life. Here are 20 Marvel Cinematic Universe movie locations you can visit in real life.

1. WARRIOR FALLS // BLACK PANTHER (2018)

Angela Bassett, Forest Whitaker, Connie Chiume, Michael B. Jordan, Chadwick Boseman, Danai Gurira, Lupita Nyong'o, and Daniel Kaluuya in 'Black Panther' (2018)
Disney/Marvel Studios

If you want to be the next king of Wakanda, you have to challenge the current king to ritual combat at Warrior Falls. While close-ups and action footage of Black Panther’s Warrior Falls were filmed on a soundstage in Atlanta, Georgia, establishing and wide shots were filmed at Iguazu Falls, a water system on the border of Argentina and Brazil in South America.

2. STARK INDUSTRIES // IRON MAN (2008)

After three months of being held captive by a terrorist group in Iron Man, Tony Stark (Robert Downey Jr.) returns to the United States and gives a press conference about his ordeal at Stark Industries HQ in Los Angeles. However, the press conference scene was filmed on location at the headquarters for Masimo, a medical technologies company based in the city of Irvine. The company’s offices have also been featured in Transformers (2007) and Dodgeball (2004).

3. CULVER UNIVERSITY // THE INCREDIBLE HULK (2008)

In The Incredible Hulk, Bruce Banner (Edward Norton) is a nuclear physicist and biochemist at Culver University in Willowdale, Virginia. For the film, the campus of the University of Toronto was used for the fictional school, while Morningside Park in Scarborough, Ontario was used for the university’s quadrangle. The park was the main filming location for General “Thunderbolt” Ross’s (William Hurt) attack on the Big Green Guy.

4. RANDY’S DONUTS // IRON MAN 2 (2010)

In Iron Man 2, Tony Stark—in full Iron Man armor—lounges inside the large, iconic donut on top of Randy’s Donuts when Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson) meets him to talk about the Avengers Initiative. The exterior of the real Randy’s Donuts location in Inglewood, California was used for filming, while the interior of the scene was filmed at Yum Yum Donuts in Playa del Rey, about 20 miles away.

Randy’s Donuts has also been featured in Get Shorty, Crocodile Dundee in Los Angeles, Earth Girls Are Easy, Dope, and episodes of Arrested Development.

5. COUNTY HOSPITAL // THOR (2011) 

As soon as the Mighty Thor arrives on Earth, Jane Foster (Natalie Portman) immediately hits the God of Thunder with her van. She rushes him to a small county hospital in Santa Fe. The production team used an office building called the Toney Anaya Building in Santa Fe, New Mexico for the hospital’s exterior.

6. PIER 13 // CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE FIRST AVENGER (2011)

After small and skinny Steve Rogers (Chris Evans) is transformed into the tall and hunky Captain America, a HYDRA infiltrator steals the super soldier serum and speeds away through the mean streets of Brooklyn, New York. Instead of filming in the borough, the film crew simply used the exterior of the Titanic Hotel at Stanley Dock in Liverpool, England for the climax of the chase scene at Pier 13.

7. LOKI’S PLATFORM // THE AVENGERS (2012)

In The Avengers, Loki (Tom Hiddleston) is in Germany when he delivers a rousing speech about humanity. In real life, the scene was filmed just outside of Tower City Center on Cleveland, Ohio’s Public Square. (You can actually see the city’s iconic Terminal Tower in the background.)

8. NEPTUNE’S NET // IRON MAN 3 (2013)

In Iron Man 3, Tony Stark has a panic attack when he’s signing autographs for fans at a seafood restaurant called Neptune’s Net. While there is a real Neptune’s Net in Malibu, California, the scene was actually filmed at Dania Beach Bar & Grill in Dania Beach, Florida. The production moved from California to Florida because the real Neptune’s Net is located on the Pacific Coast Highway and it would’ve been virtually impossible—not to mention expensive—to shut down the busy highway for filming.

9. OLD ROYAL NAVAL COLLEGE // THOR: THE DARK WORLD (2013)

In Thor: The Dark World, the climactic battle between Thor and the Dark Elf Malekith (Christopher Eccleston) takes place at Old Royal Naval College, located on the south bank of the river Thames in Greenwich, London. Thor even asks a confused subway rider how to get to Greenwich after he’s transported away from the fight.

Due to its popularity and cinematic look, Old Royal Naval College has also been featured in Cinderella (2015), Skyfall (2012), The King’s Speech (2010), Les Misérables (2012) and Netflix’s The Crown.

10. THE MALL // CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER (2014)

When Captain America and Black Widow (Scarlett Johansson) are on the run from undercover HYDRA soldiers in Captain America: The Winter Soldier, the superheroes hide in plain sight at a mall in Washington D.C. However, the scene was not filmed in the nation’s capital; it was shot on location at Tower City Center in downtown Cleveland, Ohio.

In fact, much like The Avengers, most of Captain America: The Winter Soldier was filmed at various locations in “The Land” (Cleveland’s nickname), including the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, Cleveland Public Library, Cleveland State University, the Cleveland Arcade, Cleveland Museum of Art, the Western Reserve Historical Society, and Pilgrim Congregational Church. Even the city’s highways were used to film the movie’s exciting chase scenes, namely the Cleveland Memorial Shoreway over the mighty Cuyahoga River.

11. XANDAR PLAZA // GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY (2014)

While Guardians of the Galaxy takes place on the cosmic side of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, a few real-life landmarks and buildings were used during filming. Most notably, the Liége-Guillemins Railway Station in Liège, Belgium was used for the centerpiece of Xandar Plaza, where the group of alien misfits are arrested at the beginning of Guardians of the Galaxy.

12. HYDRA RESEARCH BASE // AVENGERS: AGE OF ULTRON (2015)

At the beginning of Avengers: Age of Ultron, the titular superhero team fights their way through a forest in the fictional country of Sokovia. Their goal is to retrieve a Chitauri Scepter and the Mind Infinity Stone from inside a castle-like HYDRA research base, which was filmed at Fort Bard (or Forte di Bard) in Bard, Aosta Valley, Italy. The old fort was used as an outpost to protect the valley from Napoleon Bonaparte during the 19th century. Fort Bard is currently the location of the Museum of the Alps.

While Fort Bard was used to film the exterior, England’s Dover Castle was used to film the interior of the HYDRA research facility.

13. MILGROM HOTEL // ANT-MAN (2015)

After he is released from prison, Scott Lang (Paul Rudd) moves into his former cellmate Luis’s (Michael Peña) apartment at the Milgrom Hotel in Ant-Man. However, the real filming location was the historic Riviera Hotel on Jones Street in San Francisco’s Tenderloin District. It was originally built as a luxury hotel in 1907, but now serves as low-income housing.

14. THE AIRPORT BATTLE // CAPTAIN AMERICA: CIVIL WAR (2016)

In Captain America: Civil War, the epic showdown between Team Iron Man and Team Captain America takes place at Leipzig/Halle Airport in Schkeuditz, Germany. The airport was also the location for other movies, such as Flightplan (2005) and Unknown (2011).

15. EXETER COLLEGE // DOCTOR STRANGE (2016)

When the villain Kaecilius (Mads Mikkelsen) conjures a dark and mysterious spell from the Book of Cagliostro in Doctor Strange, he contacts Dormammu of the Dark Dimension. He recites it inside of the chapel at Exeter College in Oxford, England to seek revenge on the Ancient One (Tilda Swinton).

16. DAIRY QUEEN // GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY VOL. 2 (2017)

At the beginning of Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2, Meredith Quill (Laura Haddock) and Ego (Kurt Russell) pull into a Dairy Queen in Missouri in 1980. That Dairy Queen is actually the location of BB’s Cafe, a restaurant in Stone Mountain, Georgia, about 20 miles outside of Atlanta.

17. FORESTS OF ASGARD // THOR: RAGNAROK (2017)

In Thor: Ragnarok, Heimdall (Idris Elba) leads a large group of refugees through the forests of Asgard to find sanctuary in the mountains. A majority of the superhero movie was filmed on sound stages in Australia, while Tamborine National Park and Cedar Creek Falls in South East Queensland were used for Asgardian forests and waterfalls.

18. MIDTOWN HIGH SCHOOL // SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING (2017)

Peter Parker (Tom Holland) attends Midtown High School in Forest Hills, Queens. The production team for Spider-Man: Homecoming used Franklin K. Lane High School in Brooklyn, New York as the exterior for the fictional high school, while Henry W. Grady High School in Atlanta, Georgia was used for its interior.

19. MUSEUM OF GREAT BRITAIN // BLACK PANTHER (2018)

In 2018’s Black Panther, we meet the film’s antagonist Erik Killmonger (Michael B. Jordan) while he's viewing African art and artifacts at the Museum of Great Britain, a stand-in for the British Museum in London. Instead of traveling to England, the film’s cast and crew filmed the scene at the High Museum of Art in Atlanta, Georgia.

20. SHAWARMA PALACE // THE AVENGERS (2012)

At the end of The Avengers, Iron Man remarks that he’s never tried shawarma after he spotted a shawarma joint while flying around Manhattan during the Chitauri Battle. During the last post-credits scene, we find the very exhausted superhero team chowing down on the yummy Middle Eastern treat.

Director Joss Whedon filmed the scene at the then-Elat Burger (now Shalom Grill), located at 9340 West Pico Boulevard in Los Angeles. To keep the scene a secret, Whedon filmed it a day after the film’s world premiere, when the entire cast was in Los Angeles.

Fun fact: Sales of shawarma rose in Los Angeles, St. Louis, and Boston following the release of The Avengers in May 2012.

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King Features Syndicate
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Comics
10 Things You Might Not Know About Hägar the Horrible
King Features Syndicate
King Features Syndicate

For 45 years, the anachronistic adventures of a Scandinavian Viking named Hägar have populated the funny papers. Created by cartoonist Dik Browne, Hagar the Horrible is less about raiding and pillaging and more about Hägar’s domestic squabbles with wife Helga. If you’re a fan of this red-bearded savage with a surprisingly gentle demeanor, check out some facts about the strip’s history, Hägar’s status as a soda pitchman, and his stint as a college football mascot.

1. HÄGAR IS NAMED AFTER HIS CREATOR.

Richard Arthur “Dik” Browne got his start drawing courtroom sketches for New York newspapers; he debuted a military strip, Ginny Jeep, for servicemen after entering the Army in 1942. Following an advertising stint where he created the Chiquita Banana logo, he was asked to tackle art duties on the 1954 Beetle Bailey spinoff strip Hi and Lois. When he felt an urge to create his own strip in 1973, Browne thought back to how his children called him “Hägar the Horrible” when he would playfully chase them around the house. “Immediately, I thought Viking,” he told People in 1978. Hägar was soon the fastest-growing strip in history, appearing over 1000 papers.

2. HE COULD HAVE BEEN BULBAR THE BARBARIAN.

A Hägar the Horrible comic strip
King Features Syndicate

Working on Hi and Lois with cartoonist Mort Walker (Beetle Bailey) gave Browne an opportunity to solicit advice on Hägar from his more experienced colleague. As Walker recalled, he thought “Hägar” would be too hard for people to pronounce or spell and suggested Browne go with “Bulbar the Barbarian” instead. Browne brushed off the suggestion, preferring his own alliterative title.

3. A HEART ATTACK COULD HAVE CHANGED HÄGAR’S FATE.

When Browne came up with Hägar, he sent it along to a syndicate editor he knew from his work on Hi and Lois. According to Chris Browne, Dik’s son and the eventual artist for Hägar after his father passed away in 1989, the man originally promised to look at it after he got back from his vacation. He changed his mind at the last minute, reviewing and accepting the strip before leaving. Just days later, while on his ski vacation, the editor had a heart attack and died. If he hadn’t approved the strip prior to his passing, Browne said, Hägar may never have seen print.

4. THE STRIP HELPED BROWNE AVOID VANDALS.

A Hägar the Horrible comic strip
King Features Syndicate

Chris Browne recalled that Halloween in his Connecticut neighborhood was a time for kids to show their appreciation for his father’s work. While trick-or-treaters were busy covering nearby houses in toilet paper or spray paint, they spared the Browne residence. The only evidence of their vandalism was a spray-painted sign that read, “Mr. Browne, We Love Hägar.”

5. BROWNE’S DAUGHTER TALKED HIM OUT OF KIDNAPPING PLOTS.

Vikings were not known for being advocates for human rights. Hägar, despite his relatively genteel persona, still exhibited some barbaric traits, such as running off with “maidens” after a plundering session. Speaking with the Associated Press in 1983, Browne admitted he toned down the more lecherous side of Hägar after getting complaints from his daughter. “Running off with a maiden isn’t funny,” she told him. “It’s a crime.”

6. HÄGAR ENDORSED SODA.

A soda can featuring Hägar the Horrible
Amazon

Despite his preference for alcohol, Hägar apparently had a bit of a sweet tooth as well. In the 1970s, King Features licensed out a line of soda cans featuring some of their most popular comic strip characters, including Popeye, Blondie, and Hägar. The Viking also shilled for Mug Root Beer in the 1990s.

7. HE WAS A COLLEGE MASCOT.

In 1965, Cleveland State University students voted in the name “Vikings” for their collegiate basketball team. After using a mascot dubbed Viktorious Vike, the school adopted Hägar in the 1980s. Both Hägar and wife Helga appeared at several of the school’s sporting events before being replaced by an original character named Vike.

8. HE EVENTUALLY SOBERED UP.

A Hägar the Horrible comic strip
King Features Syndicate

When Dik Browne was working on Hägar, the Viking was prone to bouts of excessive drinking. When Chris Browne took over the strip, he made a deliberate decision to minimize Hägar’s imbibing. "When my father was doing the strip, he did an awful lot of gags about Hägar falling down drunk and coming home in a wheelbarrow, and as times go on that doesn't strike me as that funny anymore,” Brown told the Chicago Tribune in 1993. “Just about everybody I know has had somebody hurt by alcoholism or substance abuse.”

9. HE HAD HIS OWN HANNA-BARBERA CARTOON.

It took some time, but Hägar was finally honored with the animated special treatment in 1989. Cartoon powerhouse Hanna-Barbera created the 30-minute special, Hägar the Horrible: Hägar Knows Best, and cast the Viking as being out of his element after returning home for the first time in years. The voice of Optimus Prime, Peter Cullen, performed the title character. It was later released on DVD as part of a comic strip cartoon collection.

10. HE SAILED INTO THE WIZARD OF ID.

A Wizard of Id comic strip
King Features Syndicate

In 2014, Hägar made an appearance in the late Johnny Hart’s Wizard of Id comic strip, with the two characters looking confused at the idea they’ve run into one another at sea. Hägar also made a cameo in Blondie to celebrate that character’s 75th birthday in 2005.

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