15 Commercials Directed By David Lynch

Getty Images
Getty Images

David Lynch is responsible for some of the most visceral and disturbing films in history. But for decades, the director of Eraserhead, Blue Velvet, Mulholland Drive, and other classics has been creating works for a wholly different realm: advertising.

It may be surprising that Lynch, who is a stickler for having total control over his movies, would agree to make commercials under the watchful eyes of corporate bean counters—but he’s not exactly a stickler for doing the expected thing, either. Here are 15 of his commercials, for everything from perfumes to pastas to pregnancy tests.

1. Obsession By Calvin Klein (1988)

Lynch’s first commercials for Calvin Klein’s fragrance line became iconic and are imitated and satirized to this day. He made a series of four, and each one is a short interpretation of a quote: from F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, D.H. Lawrence, and Gustave Flaubert.

2-5. Georgia Coffee (1991)

These ads only appeared in Japan and directly rode the wave of Lynch’s wildly popular television series Twin Peaks by featuring established characters and visual cues. “I’m really against it in principle,” Lynch said about the commercials, “But they were so much fun to do, and they were only running in Japan and so it just felt OK.”

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6. New York Department of Sanitation (1991)

“We Care About New York” is a Lynch-directed PSA that tries to bring attention to the city’s rat infestation problem.

7. Gio for Giorgio Armani (1992)

According to NY Mag, Armani picked Lynch for “his brooding tone, his surrealism and sleepy pace.” They also mentioned that “Armani’s other two candidates were busy.”

8. Opium for Yves Saint Laurent

9. Alka-Seltzer Plus (1993)

For someone as meticulous when it comes to sound design as Lynch, there was just no turning down the allure of plop plop, fizz fizz.

10. Barilla Pasta (1993)

Is this spot featuring Gérard Depardieu the most un-Lynchian thing ever made? You be the judge:

11. Adidas (1993)

The Guardian reported that Lynch earned “close to $1million” for this British advertisement.

12. Sun Moon Stars for Karl Lagerfeld (1994)

13. Clear Blue Pregnancy Test (1997)

Anyone who has seen Eraserhead knows what Lynch can do with a subject like pregnancy. According to Entertainment Weekly, Lynch made the actress actually take a pregnancy test for the commercial. If that wasn’t enough to get her into the mood, “Lynch switched her results with those of a pregnant crew member.”

14. Playstation 2 (2000)

15. Nissan (2002)

According to Lynch (via Carpages.co.uk), “I like the Micra, particularly the headlamps. They are like jewels. And I like the concept of ‘Do you speak Micra?’ I like modern and retro put together to make modtro—that’s a very good concept… I think it was Magritte who put lips in the sky. This is a bit of the feel of those big beautiful lips speaking in a supermodern and very graphic city.”

Everything You Need to Know About the New DC Universe Streaming Service

Brenton Thwaites stars in DC Universe's Titans
Brenton Thwaites stars in DC Universe's Titans
Warner Bros. Television

by Natalie Zamora

Although the fates of two major DC superheroes, Superman and Batman, are kind of up in the air right now as far as for their Extended Universes, things are looking up for the franchise, as their exclusive streaming service has just launched. Here's everything you need to know about DC Universe.

THE SIGNIFICANCE

With all the different types of streaming services we have today, why is DC Universe so special, and why would someone pay for it if they can find the content elsewhere? Well, this streaming service allows all your favorite DC content to live in one space. Instead of having to search for what you want throughout the internet, you can find it all here. For the die-hard fan, this is perfect.

DC Universe offers an impressive collection of live-action and animated movies, TV shows, documentaries, and comic books. The service also offers exclusive toys you can only get by being a subscriber.

THE CONTENT

Heath Ledger stars as The Joker in 'The Dark Knight' (2008)
© TM & DC Comics/Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.

So, what exact DC content lives on DC Universe? Well, there's a range of content from recent to old-school, such as Batman: The Animated Series, The Dark Knight, Teen Titans, and Constantine. Apart from what's on there now, the service will be debuting the live-action Titans series later this year, along with Swamp Thing and Doom Patrol in 2019. DC is also developing new series for Harley Quinn and Young Justice: Outsiders, exclusively for the service.

THE PRICE

​To get all of this exclusive DC content, it must be expensive, right? No, not really. Compared to Netflix, which is $10.99 a month, DC Universe is inexpensive, at a rate of $7.99 monthly or $74.99 annually. It is a bit pricier than Hulu, however, which is $5.99 monthly for the first year, then $7.99 monthly after. Like most streaming services, you can also try a free seven-day trial with DC Universe.

HOW TO SIGN UP

​Are you sold? If so, the sign up process is fairly simple. Head to ​DC Universe, create an account, and choose your plan, either monthly or annually. Either way, you'll get your free seven-day trial to browse around and see for yourself if it's really worth it.

10 Classic Books That Have Been Banned

iStock
iStock

From the Bible to Harry Potter, some of the world's most popular books have been challenged for reasons ranging from violence to occult overtones. In honor of National Book Lovers Day, here's a look at 10 classic books that have stirred up controversy.

1. THE CALL OF THE WILD

The Call of the Wild, Jack London's 1903 Klondike Gold Rush-set adventure, was banned in Yugoslavia and Italy for being "too radical" and was burned by the Nazis because of the author's well-known socialist leanings.

2. THE GRAPES OF WRATH

Though The Grapes of Wrath—John Steinbeck's 1939 novel about a family of tenant farmers who are forced to leave their Oklahoma home for California because of economic hardships—earned the author both the National Book Award and a Pulitzer Prize, it also drew ire across America because some believed it promoted Communist values. Kern County, California (where much of the book took place) was particular incensed by Steinbeck's portrayal of the area and its working conditions, which they considered slanderous.

3. THE LORAX

The cover of Dr. Seuss' The Lorax
Google Play

Whereas some readers look at the title character Dr. Seuss's The Lorax and see a fuzzy little guy who "speaks for the trees," others saw the 1971 children's book as a dangerous piece of political commentary, with even the author reportedly referring to it as "propaganda."

4. ULYSSES

James Joyce's 1922 novel Ulysses may be one of the most important and influential works of the early 20th century, but it was also deemed obscene for both its language and sexual content—and not just in a few provincial places. In 1921, a group known as The New York Society for the Suppression of Vice successfully managed to keep the book out of the United States, and the United States Post Office regularly burned copies of it. But in 1933, the book's publisher, Random House, took the case—United States v. One Book Called Ulysses—to court, and ended up getting the ban overturned.

5. ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT

In 1929, Erich Maria Remarque—a German World War I veteran—wrote the novel All Quiet on the Western Front, which gives an accounting of the extreme mental and physical stress the German soldiers faced during their time in the war. Perhaps unsurprisingly, the book's realism didn't sit well with Nazi leaders, who feared the book would deter their propaganda efforts.

6. ANIMAL FARM

The cover of George Orwell's Animal Farm
Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

The original publication of Animal Farm, George Orwell's 1945 allegorical novella, was delayed in the UK because of its anti-Stalin themes. It was confiscated in Germany by Allied troops, banned in Yugoslavia in 1946, banned in Kenya in 1991, and banned in the United Arab Emirates in 2002.

7. AS I LAY DYING

Though many people consider William Faulkner's 1930 novel As I Lay Dying a classic piece of American literature, the Graves County School District in Mayfield, Kentucky disagreed. In 1986, the school district banned the book because it questioned the existence of God.

8. LOLITA

Sure, it's well known that Vladimir Nabokov's Lolita is about a middle-aged literature professor who is obsessed with a 12-year-old girl who eventually becomes his stepdaughter. It's the kind of storyline that would raise eyebrows today, so imagine what the response was when the book was released in 1955. A number of countries—including France, England, Argentina, New Zealand, and South Africa—banned the book for being obscene. Canada did the same in 1958, though it later lifted the ban on what is now considered a classic piece of literature—unreliable narrator and all.

9. THE CATCHER IN THE RYE

Cover of The Catcher in the Rye

Reading J.D. Salinger's The Catcher in the Rye has practically become a rite of passage for teenagers, but back when it was published in 1951, it wasn't always easy for a kid to get his or her hands on it. According to TIME, "Within two weeks of its 1951 release, J.D. Salinger’s novel rocketed to No. 1 on the New York Times best-seller list. Ever since, the book—which explores three days in the life of a troubled 16-year-old boy—has been a 'favorite of censors since its publication,' according to the American Library Association."

10. THE GIVER

The newest book on this list, Lois Lowry's 1993 novel The Giverabout a dystopia masquerading as a utopiawas banned in several U.S. states, including California and Kentucky, for addressing issues such as euthanasia.

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