CLOSE

NHL Expansion and Relocation, 1942-Present

Last year, we made a map showing the history of NHL team relocation and expansion from the Original Six in 1942 to the current 30 teams in 2014. This year, we decided to improve the map and also show how the logos of each team changed over time. As you can see, most teams stuck to a basic design, but others experimented with a variety of different ideas and images. 

The timeline is as follows:

1942-1967: The Original Six era of the NHL. The teams are the Boston Bruins, the New York Rangers, the Chicago Black Hawks, the Montreal Canadiens, the Toronto Maple Leafs, and the Detroit Red Wings.

1967-1970: Six new teams are introduced, doubling the number of teams in the league. The new additions are the California Seals (changed to the Oakland Seals that same year), the Los Angeles Kings, the Minnesota North Stars, the Philadelphia Flyers, the St. Louis Blues, and the Pittsburgh Penguins. 

1970-1972: The league makes two more additions: the Buffalo Sabres and the Vancouver Canucks. The Oakland Seals have a second identity crisis and switch their name to the California Golden Seals. 

1972-1974: The New York Islanders and the Atlanta Flames join the league. 

1974-1976: The Kansas City Scouts and the Washington Capitals join the league, making the total number of teams now 18. 

1976-1978: The California Golden Seals franchise moves, becoming the Cleveland Barons. The Kansas City Scouts also relocate to Colorado to become the Rockies. 

1978-1979: The Cleveland Barons merge with the Minnesota North Stars and the number of teams drops to 17. 

1979-1980: Four teams from the short-lived World Hockey Association join the NHL: the Edmonton Oilers, the Hartford Whalers, the Quebec Nordiques, and the Winnipeg Jets. 

1980-1982: The Atlanta Flames move to Calgary and become the Calgary Flames.

1982-1991: The Colorado Rockies relocate and become the New Jersey Devils. The Chicago Black Hawks make a minor tweak and change their name to the Blackhawks. 

1991-1992: The San Jose Sharks join the league to kick off the beginning of the rapid expansion era of the '90s. There are now 22 teams. 

1992-1993: The Ottawa Senators and the Tampa Bay Lightning join the league, which now has a total of 24 teams.

1993-1995: The following season, the Minnesota North Stars move to become the Dallas Stars. The Florida Panthers and the Anaheim Mighty Ducks begin to play.

1995-1996: The Quebec Nordiques are now the Colorado Avalanche. 

1996-1997: The Winnipeg Jets become the Phoenix Coyotes. 

1997-1998: The Hartford Whalers move and become the Carolina Hurricanes. 

1998-1999: The Nashville Predators become the 27th team in 1998. 

1999-2000: The Atlanta Thrashers begin to play in 1999. There are now 28 teams. 

2000-2011: The Columbus Blue Jackets and the Minnesota Wild become the NHL's two newest additions in 2000. The Anaheim Mighty Ducks become the Ducks after Disney sells the team, just in time for the 2006 season.There are now 30 teams.

2011-2014: The Atlanta Thrashers move to become the new Winnipeg Jets. 

2014-2015: The Phoenix Coyotes change their name to the Arizona Coyotes. 

The Afternoon Map is a semi-regular feature in which we post maps and infographics. In the afternoon. Semi-regularly. 

arrow
Afternoon Map
Monthly Internet Costs in Every Country

Thanks to the internet, people around the world can conduct global research, trade tips, and find faraway friends without ever leaving their couch. Not everyone pays the same price for these digital privileges, though, according to new data visualizations spotted by Thrillist.

To compare internet user prices in each country, cost information site HowMuch.net created a series of maps. The data comes courtesy of English market research consultancy BDRC and Cable.co.uk, which teamed up to analyze 3351 broadband packages in 196 nations between August 18, 2017 and October 12, 2017.

In the U.S., for example, the average cost for internet service is $66 per month. That’s substantially more than what browsers pay in neighboring Mexico ($27) and Canada ($55). Still, we don’t have it bad compared to either Namibia or Burkina Faso, where users shell out a staggering $464 and $924, respectively, for monthly broadband access. In fact, internet in the U.S. is far cheaper than what residents in 113 countries pay, including those in Saudi Arabia ($84), Indonesia ($72), and Greenland ($84).

On average, internet costs in Asia and Russia tend to be among the lowest, while access is prohibitively expensive in sub-Saharan Africa and in certain parts of Oceania. As for the world’s cheapest internet, you’ll find it in Ukraine and Iran.

Check out the maps below for more broadband insights, or view HowMuch.net’s full findings here.

Map of Internet costs in each country created by information site HowMuch.net.
HowMuch.net

Map of Internet costs in each country created by information site HowMuch.net.
HowMuch.net

Map of Internet costs in each country created by information site HowMuch.net.
HowMuch.net

Map of Internet costs in each country created by information site HowMuch.net.
HowMuch.net

Map of Internet costs in each country created by information site HowMuch.net.
HowMuch.net

[h/t Thrillist]

nextArticle.image_alt|e
iStock
arrow
fun
Can You Figure Out Why the Turtles Bulge in This Optical Illusion?
iStock
iStock

Ready for a little vision test? Akiyoshi Kitaoka, a Kyoto-based psychologist who studies visual illusions, created this eye-bending image that appears to bulge and bend. In the image, shared on Syfy.com, the horizontal and vertical lines actually run straight across and down, but they look like they ripple, and the shapes (Kitaoka calls them turtles) look like they’re different shades of gray, even though they’re an identical color.

As Phil Plait explains for Syfy, the key is in the corners—the turtle “legs,” if you will. “At each vertex between turtles, they form a rotated square divided into four smaller squares," he writes. "Note how they're offset from one another, giving a twist to the vertices.” If you zoom in closely on the image, the lines begin to straighten out.

The difference in the colors, meanwhile, is a result of the contrast between the black and white pixels outlining the turtles. If the outlines of the turtles were entirely black or entirely white, instead of a combination, the grays would look identical. But the contrast between the two fools your eyes into thinking they're different.

To see more of Kitaoka’s illusion art, you can follow him on Twitter @AkiyoshiKitaoka. Then, go check out these other amazing optical illusions.

[h/t Syfy]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios