This Australian Clinic for Orphaned Bats is Adorable

Bats are often seen as scary or creepy creatures of the night, commonly found in Halloween themed decorations, or haunted houses. Even the animal-loving Ace Ventura didn't like them. But bats aren’t scary—they’re downright adorable. 

The Australian Bat Clinic & Wildlife Trauma Centre, founded by American-born Terry Wimberle, aims to help these flying mammals, which can sometimes end up orphaned or in need of immediate care after being plagued with mites, suffering in extreme heat, or having run-ins with barbed wire, among other terrible things.  

Luckily for us, the center is very active on Facebook, and posts a plethora of bat photos for the public to enjoy. The images range from babies wrapped in blankets, to slightly older bats rocking some trendy vests.

Baby bats love to be held; they cling to their mothers, who then wrap their wings around them. Orphans lack the security of a winged embrace, so the clinic swaddles the babies. When bottle-fed, the tiny mammals look like furry infants.

All bats start with a steady diet of milk, but move on to insects or fruit, depending on the type of bat. Flying foxes—the largest type of bat in Australia—exclusively eat fruits like mango or melon. They chew the fruit until they’ve extracted all the juice, and then spit out the pulp. Here’s one bat really enjoying his mango:

The bat clinic is always looking for volunteers and donations, so check out their website if you would like to give your support.  

The 10 Most Popular Cat Names of 2018

iStock/101cats
iStock/101cats

We’ve never met your cat, but we know for a fact that he or she is one-of-a-kind. What might not be so unique? Your little ball o’ fluff’s name ... especially if it’s Luna.

Banfield Pet Hospital, the world’s largest general veterinary, mined its database of more than 500,000 feline patients to see which monikers experienced an uptick in popularity in 2018. As was the case in 2017, Luna topped the list of most popular cat names (while the far-less-innovative Kitty came in third).

Pop culture continues to be a big inspiration when it comes to cat names. Though the This is Us-themed names Jack and Milo dropped in popularity between 2017 and 2018, they both still managed to crack the top 20, while Lando saw a 31 percent increase in popularity thanks to Solo: A Star Wars Story.

Here are the 10 most popular cat names of 2018. Did your kitty’s make the cut?

1. Luna

2. Bella

3. Kitty

4. Oliver

5. Lucy

6. Charlie

7. Shadow

8. Max

9. Leo

10. Milo

12 Old-Timey Turkey Terms to Bring Back This Thanksgiving

iStock.com/westernphotographs
iStock.com/westernphotographs

Want to spice up conversation this Thanksgiving? Use these terms while you’re talking turkey.

1. RUM COBBLE-COLTER

According to A new dictionary of the terms ancient and modern of the canting crew, in its several tribes, of Gypsies, beggers, thieves, cheats, &c., with an addition of some proverbs, phrases, figurative speeches, &c., first published in the late 1600s, a cobble-colter is a turkey. A rum cobble-colter, on the other hand, is "a fat large cock-turkey."

2. I GUESS IT’S ALL TURKEY

This American phrase is “a quaint saying indicating that all is equally good.”

3. AND 4. BUBBLY-JOCK AND BOBBLE-COCK

Bubbly-jock is Scottish slang for a male turkey, from the noise the bird makes. The term can also be used to describe “a stupid, boasting person.” Both usages might apply at your Thanksgiving dinner. Slang for a turkey in northern England, meanwhile, is bobble-cock, according to The Slang Dictionary: Or, The Vulgar Words, Street Phrases, and "Fast Expressions” of High and Low Society, published in 1864.

5. TURKEY MERCHANTS

According to 1884’s The Slang Dictionary: Etymological, Historical, and Anecdotal, this was a term for “dealers in plundered or contraband silk.” Previously, it referred to something more obvious: “a driver of turkeys and geese to market.”

6. ALDERMAN

A “well-stuffedturkey. An alderman in chains is a turkey with sausages; according to A Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue, published in 1788, the sausages “are supposed to represent the gold chain worn by those magistrates.”

7. COLD TURKEY RAP

According to Eric Partridge's A Dictionary of the Underworld: British and American, this 1928 term means "an accusation, a charge, against a person caught in the act." Perhaps you'll get a cold turkey rap for stealing seconds—or thirds—of your favorite dish this holiday.

8. BLOCK ISLAND TURKEY

An American slang term for salted cod, originating in Connecticut and Rhode Island.

9. TURKEY PUDDLE

Eighteenth-century slang for coffee.

10. SNOTERGOB

According to A Dictionary of the Scottish Language, snotergob is “the red part of a turkey’s head.”

11. RED AS A TURKEY COCK

This phrase dates back to 1630, according to Dictionary of Proverbs. It could refer to any kind of flushing of the face (including, perhaps, when your dad and your uncle are getting too worked up debating politics).

12. TO HAVE A TURKEY ON ONE’S BACK

According to the 1905 book A Dictionary of Slang and Colloquial English, this is what you say when someone has imbibed a bit too much: It means “to be drunk.”

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER