20 Things You Might Not Know About The Care Bears Movie

Care Bear stare! Gather around, Brave Heart Lion, Share Bear, Birthday Bear, and the rest of the gang, and let’s learn something new about The Care Bears Movie—the original (and still the best) film starring one of the 1980s' most beloved animated properties.

1. The film starred lots of big names in voice-only parts.

Mickey Rooney quite notably played Mr. Cherrywood, our narrator, but the film also featured the singing talents of veteran actor Harry Dean Stanton (as the singing voice of Brave Heart Lion), and beloved pop star Carole King (of “You’ve Got a Friend” fame) sang the title song.

2. The Care Bear Cousins made their first on-screen appearance.

Although the Care Bears proper had already starred in a pair of television series, The Care Bears Movie marked the first on-screen appearance of the so-called Care Bear Cousins, including Brave Heart Lion and Playful Heart Monkey.

3. Strawberry Shortcake Meets the Berrykins played before the film’s theatrical showings.

The 25-minute animated short found Strawberry Shortcake battling an icky-smelling cloud that infiltrates Strawberryland, aided by new friends the Berrykins (and also Banana Twirl, who never appeared in another Strawberry Shortcake outing again).

4. The film was a major hit for Canada.

The Care Bears Movie made more than $34 million at the box office, making it Canada’s highest-grossing hit for the entire year of 1985.

5. It was also a box office smash in the United States.

With a $23 million box office take just in the U.S., The Care Bears Movie was almost the number one G-rated feature film of 1985, though it ultimately lost the top spot to a reissue of 101 Dalmatians. Still, it ended up number two for the year, beating both Follow That Bird and Rainbow Brite and The Star Stealer.

6. The film inspired two tie-in books.

Both Meet The Care Bear Cousins and Keep On Caring were released by Parker Brothers after the film hit the big screen. The popular books were reissued mere months later, with both serving as charming backup material for the film.

7. The Care Bears Movie premiered as part of a Special Olympics event.

Although the movie didn’t open in North America until March 29, it actually premiered on March 24 at a benefit for the Special Olympics.

8. In Germany, the film is known as Der Glücksbärchi Film.

The tongue-twisting title loosely translates to “Happiness Bears Film.” In Germany, the Care Bears are known as “barchis.”

9. The feature was one of the first films to be made from a toy line.

The Care Bears were snuggly toys before they ever made it to the big screen, and The Care Bears Movie marked one of the first times a studio attempted to reverse engineer the process, making a toy and then giving its fans a movie to enjoy.

10. The movie doesn’t include every single Care Bear or Care Bear Cousin.

Missing from the film? Both True Heart Bear and Noble Heart Horse.

11. The film was only the second feature ever made by Nelvana.

The Canadian entertainment company had previously made specials and television series, but The Care Bears Movie was only the second feature-length film they ever made. Later, the company also crafted both of the follow-up features, Care Bears Movie II: A New Generation and The Care Bears Adventure in Wonderland.

12. The Care Bears Movie was director Arna Selznick’s feature debut.

Although she had previously directed the television special, Strawberry Shortcake and the Baby Without a Name, The Care Bears Movie was Selznick’s first feature film. She later worked on both sequels and The Care Bears Family series.

13. It’s an award winner.

The Care Bears Movie won Canada’s Golden Reel Award, given to whichever Canadian film earns the most at the box office for any given year. Although the award is now given out by the Canadian Screen Awards, in 1985, it was still part of the Genies, which function as the country’s own version of the Oscars.

14. The movie was in the making for a number of years.

Despite the popularity of the Care Bear toys, the film didn’t get off the ground very quickly. Although it was planned as far back as 1981, its creators had trouble finding a movie studio to actually make the film.

15. The Care Bears went after another enemy after the film’s release.

In 1985, The Care Bears Help Chase Colds, A Practical Cough and Care Guide for the Entire Family was released as a promotional tie-in for the film—albeit one that provided very valuable advice for families and fans everywhere.

16. There were rumors of a sequel mere days after the first film opened.

Although we’re used to hearing about possible sequels as soon as new features open, that was still a rarity back in the '80s, especially when it came to kids’ films. Within just weeks of blowing up the box office, the media was already speculating that we were due for more Care Bear hugs.

17. The movie hit home video in just months.

Eager to capitalize on its popularity, The Care Bears Movie hit Beta just three months after it arrived in theaters.

18. The Care Bears Movie was written by the head writer of Inspector Gadget.

Peter Sauder penned the screenplay for the movie, one of his many gigs as a Nelvana employee. In addition to serving as the head writer of Inspector Gadget, he also wrote the Strawberry Shortcake short that played in front of the movie, along with the earlier TV special The Care Bears Battle the Freeze Machine and both sequels.

19. A number of the Care Bears were voiced by the same people.

Eva Almos provided the voice for Friend Bear, Champ Bear, and Swift Heart Rabbit, while Melleny Brown voiced both Birthday Bear and Cheer Bear, and Patricia Black played Funshine Bear and Share Bear.

20. The Care Bears went to the Cannes Film Festival.

Even though The Care Bears Movie opened months before the prestigious festival kicked off, the Care Bears—including people dressed up as the Bears—hit Cannes to promote the film.

Orson Welles's Former Hollywood Hills Estate Is Taking Vacation Reservations

Fred Mott, Getty Images
Fred Mott, Getty Images

Orson Welles's former Hollywood Hills estate is a perfect place to get away from society, grow a bushy beard, and brood over a bottle of whiskey.

Interested? The late Hollywood icon's 3000-square-foot home is available to rent for about $755 a night through HomeAway. The house, which sits on its own private 15,000-square-foot knoll, was home to Welles at the very beginning of his career and is where he wrote the screenplay for 1941's Citizen Kane. Bring along your typewriter and try to channel some of his greatness.

Quite a few other celebrities have inhabited the house as well, including Rita Hayworth, Frank Sinatra, Barbra Streisand, and David Bowie. Features of the grand four-bedroom mansion—built in 1928—include a lagoon pool, Jacuzzi, deck, and both canyon and city views.

There's never been a better time to rent Welles's abode: his final film, The Other Side of the Wind, is set to premiere at this month's Venice Film Festival before arriving on Netflix. The unfinished flick, which was shot intermittently between 1970 and 1976, has been completed and restored for its much-anticipated release. (Of course the mansion has plenty of TVs for your viewing pleasure.)

The property has a three- to five-night stay minimum, depending on the season. For more pictures, see below or head to HomeAway. And since you're already in vacation-planning mode, another creative celebrity abode to consider is F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald's Montgomery, Alabama home, which is available to rent via Airbnb.

Orson Welles' house
Courtesy of HomeAway

Orson Welles mansion
Courtesy of HomeAway

Orson Welles' former home
Courtesy of HomeAway

Orson Welles' former home
Courtesy of HomeAway

Orson Welles' former home
Courtesy of HomeAway

10 Things You Might Not Know About Robert De Niro

RALPH GATTI, AFP/Getty Images
RALPH GATTI, AFP/Getty Images

Robert De Niro is part of the pantheon of independent-minded filmmakers who cut through Hollywood noise in the 1970s with edgier fare to create what became known as “The New Hollywood.” Following stints with Brian De Palma and Roger Corman, De Niro teamed up with Martin Scorsese for the first time with 1973's Mean Streets, which launched a fruitful artistic collaboration that has produced some of the best movies of the past half-century.

Even after his shift into commercial comedies like Meet the Parents, “dedication” has remained De Niro’s watchword. The two-time Oscar winner has earned Hollywood legend status with panache and bone-deep portrayals. Here are 10 facts about the filmmaker on his 75th birthday. (Yes, we’re talkin’ to you.)

1. HIS FIRST ROLE WAS IN A STAGING OF THE WIZARD OF OZ—AT AGE 10.

Robert De Niro got bit by the acting bug early. He threatened to thrash a hippopotamus from top to bottom-us as the Cowardly Lion in The Wizard of Oz at the tender age of 10. (This is the remake and casting the world needs right now.)

2. HE DROPPED OUT OF HIGH SCHOOL TO PURSUE ACTING.

Robert De Niro arrives at the UK premiere of epic war drama film 'The Deer Hunter', UK, 28th February 1979
John Minihan, Evening Standard/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

De Niro’s mother, Virginia Admiral, was a painter whose work was part of the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, and his father, Robert De Niro, Sr., was a celebrated abstract expressionist painter. So the apple falling into drama school instead of the art studio still isn’t that far from the tree. Having already gotten a youthful dose of stage life, De Niro quit his private high school to try to become an actor. He first went to the nonprofit HB Studio before studying under Stella Adler and, later, The Actors Studio.

3. HE’S A DUAL CITIZEN OF THE UNITED STATES AND ITALY.

De Niro is American, Italian-American, and, as of 2004, Italian. The country bestowed honorary citizenship upon De Niro as an honor in recognition of his career, but it wasn’t all smooth sailing to the passport office. A group called the Order of the Sons of Italy in America strongly protested the Italian government’s plan due to De Niro’s frequent portrayal of negative Italian-American stereotypes.

4. HE GAINED 60 POUNDS FOR RAGING BULL.

Preparing to play the misfortune-laden boxing champ Jake LaMotta in Raging Bull required two major things from De Niro: training and gaining. For the latter, De Niro ate his way through Europe during a four-month binge of ice cream and pasta. His 60-pound-gain was dramatic enough that it concerned Martin Scorsese. It was one way to show dedication to a role, but the training element was even more impressive. De Niro got so good at boxing that when LaMotta set up several professional-level sparring bouts for the actor, De Niro won two of them.

5. HE AND MARLON BRANDO ARE THE ONLY ACTORS TO WIN OSCARS FOR PLAYING THE SAME CHARACTER.

De Niro won his first Oscar in 1975 for The Godfather: Part II, for portraying the younger version of Vito Corleone—the wizened capo played by Marlon Brando, who also won an Oscar for the role (Brando’s came in 1973, for The Godfather). No other pair of actors has managed the feat, although Jeff Bridges came close in 2010 when he was nominated for playing Rooster Cogburn in Joel and Ethan Coen's True Grit (a role originated by John Wayne in Henry Hathaway’s 1969 movie of the same name). Oddly enough, Bridges was in contention for the role of Travis Bickle, the role that earned De Niro his first Oscar nomination for Best Actor in a Leading Role.

6. HE DROVE A CAB TO PREPARE FOR TAXI DRIVER.

If you’re looking for commitment to a role, ask Hack #265216. De Niro got a taxicab driver’s license to study up to play Travis Bickle in Taxi Driver and spent several weekends cruising around New York City picking up fares. It’s possible that having his teeth filed down for Cape Fear is the most intense transformation he’s undergone for a role, but picking up a part-time job to live the lonely life of Bickle is more humane.

7. ONE OF HIS FILMS POSTPONED ONE OF HIS OSCAR WINS.

The 53rd Academy Awards—where De Niro won for playing Jake LaMotta in Raging Bull—were originally scheduled for March 30, 1981 but were postponed until the following day because of an assassination attempt on President Ronald Reagan. The would-be assassin, John Hinckley, Jr., claimed the attack was intended to impress Jodie Foster, who Hinckley grew obsessed with after watching Taxi Driver.

8. HE LAUNCHED THE TRIBECA FILM FESTIVAL IN THE WAKE OF 9/11.

Robert De Niro and Jane Rosenthal speak onstage at the 'Clive Davis: The Soundtrack of Our Lives' Premiere during the 2017 Tribeca Film Festival at Radio City Music Hall on April 19, 2017 in New York City
Theo Wargo, Getty Images for Tribeca Film Festival

Producer Jane Rosenthal, philanthropist Craig M. Hatkoff, and De Niro founded the Tribeca Film Festival in 2001 as a showcase for independent films that would hopefully “spur the economic and cultural revitalization of lower Manhattan” after the devastation of the 9/11 terror attacks. With its empire state of mind, the inaugural festival in 2002 featured a “Best of New York Series” handpicked by Martin Scorsese and drew an astonishing 150,000 attendees.

9. HE WAS ONCE INTERROGATED BY FRENCH POLICE CONCERNING A PROSTITUTION RING.

One of the most bizarre chapters in De Niro’s life came when he was publicly named in the investigation of a prostitution ring in Paris. The 1998 incident included a lengthy interrogation session (De Niro filed an official complaint) and a pile of paparazzi waiting for him when he left the prosecutor’s office. De Niro railed against the entire country, vowing to return his Legion of Honour and telling Le Monde newspaper that, "I will never return to France. I will advise my friends against going to France.” (He had cooled off enough by 2011 to act as the Cannes Film Festival’s jury president.)

10. HE LOVED THE CAT(S) IN MEET THE PARENTS.

Meet the Parents’s Mr. Jinx (Jinxy!) was played by two Himalayans named Bailey and Misha, and De Niro fell in love with them. He played with them between scenes, kept kibble in his pocket for them, and asked director Jay Roach to have Mr. Jinx in as many scenes as possible.

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