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20th Century Fox
20th Century Fox

16 Totally Awesome Facts About Point Break

20th Century Fox
20th Century Fox

Before you ride that last wave during the 50-year storm, see if you know everything about Point Break. As always, vaya con dios.

1. THE STORY WAS CONCEIVED IN AN APPROPRIATE PLACE.

Co-producer Rick King (who also has a “Story by” credit on the movie) first came up with the idea for the movie while lounging on the beach. He had been given an LA Weekly article about Los Angeles being the robbery capital of America and dreamed up a movie about an FBI agent infiltrating a surf gang that robs banks to fuel their fun.

2. WRITING THE SCRIPT WASN’T THE SCREENWRITER’S ONLY JOB.

King recruited screenwriter W. Peter Iliff to pen the script for only $6000. Since the pay was paltry, Iliff had to wait tables at a restaurant during the day before going home to write the script for Point Break at night.

3. THE MOVIE WENT THROUGH SEVERAL TITLES.

The movie was originally supposed to be titled “Johnny Utah,” the name of the character eventually played by Keanu Reeves. It was renamed “Riders on the Storm” during the first half of production, but was changed to Point Break—a surfing term for a wave that hits a piece of land extended from the coastline—before production wrapped.

4. KEANU REEVES WASN’T THE FIRST CHOICE TO PLAY JOHNNY UTAH.

The producers of the movie wanted Charlie Sheen or Johnny Depp for the role, but director Kathryn Bigelow demanded that Reeves be given the part. In fact, Patrick Swayze originally auditioned for the part of Utah before eventually landing the role of Bodhi.

5. UTAH’S NAME WAS BASED ON A FOOTBALL ICON.

Though Johnny never made it past being a quarterback at Ohio State in the movie, screenwriter W. Peter Iliff based the character’s name on NFL quarterback Joe Montana.

6. BODHI AND JOHNNY HAD A HISTORY.

Point Break isn’t the first time Patrick Swayze and Keanu Reeves worked together. They previously starred in the 1986 hockey drama Youngblood, which was Reeves’ first studio movie appearance.

7. THE PRODUCTION TOOK YEARS.

The movie was originally set up to go into production in 1987 with Ridley Scott at the helm before the producers backed out after losing the film rights. It was picked up again and completed four years later when James Cameron and his then-wife Bigelow were looking for projects for Bigelow to direct.

8. THE EX-PRESIDENTS WERE REAL SURFERS.

Instead of getting actors who could surf, Bigelow cast surfers who could act to be in the gang of “Ex-Presidents.” Bojesse Christopher (who plays Grommet) and John Philbin (who plays Nathaniel) were pro surfers who acted on the side.

9. THE FOOT CHASE BETWEEN BODHI AND UTAH WAS TECHNICALLY COMPLEX.

To get a sense of frenetic energy for the scene, Bigelow and her crew shot the sequence with what they dubbed the “pogo-cam,” which was a rig that mounted a gyro-stabilized camera on a body-length pole that could be led by the cameraman shooting the actors in front or behind him.

10. SWAYZE MISSED OUT ON SHOOTING THE FOOT CHASE.

Swayze is not the one wearing the Reagan mask during the foot chase sequence. Instead, his stunt double, Scott Wilder, performed the scene because Swayze was in Europe doing press for Ghost.

11. ONE OF THE SURFERS IS A REAL-LIFE ROCK STAR.

One of the members of the surf gang is none other than Red Hot Chili Peppers frontman Anthony Kiedis. Point Break wasn’t his first acting gig; he started acting in 1978 under the pseudonym “Cole Dammett,” and first appeared as Sylvester Stallone’s son in the movie F.I.S.T.

Point Break isn’t the only time Reeves shared the screen with a member of the Red Hot Chili Peppers. Reeves appeared in My Own Private Idaho (also released in 1991) with RHCP’s bassist, Flea.

12. THE CAST RECEIVED EXTENSIVE FIGHT TRAINING.

Second unit director and stunt coordinator Glenn Wilder held fight training sessions for the cast on weekends because Bigelow wanted the actors to do their own fights onscreen without stuntmen. Kiedis was allegedly the only cast member to miss this training, so Wilder had his character knocked out with one punch during the first fight sequence in the movie.

13. THE SKYDIVING SCENES WERE FAKE …

To get close-ups of the actors during the skydiving sequences, a crane rig with a telescoping arm was built for each actor. The rigs enabled the cast to say their lines while the camera shot them from below to achieve the sense of floating while skydiving.

14. … BUT THEY WERE ALSO REAL.

Swayze, who participated in skydiving as a hobby, was told to stop for insurance purposes once production began. Producers coaxed him into the agreement with the promise of letting the star do one actual skydive onscreen. The uncut shot of Bodhi yelling “Adios amigo!” and falling from the plane features Swayze actually making a jump.

15. THE SURFING SCENES WERE REAL, BUT WEREN’T THE REAL ACTORS.

Though cast members took surfing lessons to appear in some of the less technically complex surfing shots, many of the more dangerous shots utilized pro-surfer stunt doubles. During the “50-Year Storm” scene at the end of the movie, Swayze was doubled by legendary big-wave surfer Darrick Doerner.

16. THE MOVIE INSPIRED ITS OWN STAGE SHOW.

Point Break Live! consists of actors performing the entire movie onstage, with one catch: A random audience member is chosen to play the part of Johnny Utah and, in a send-up of Reeves’ flighty performance onscreen, the person must read all his lines off of cue cards.

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Pop Chart Lab
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Comics
The Origins of 36 Marvel Characters, Illustrated
Pop Chart Lab
Pop Chart Lab

No matter what their powers, every super hero has an origin story, from Spider-Man’s radioactive bite to Iron Man’s life-threatening chest shrapnel. In their latest poster, the designers at Pop Chart Lab have taken their infographic savvy to the Marvel Universe, charting the heroic origins of 36 different Marvel characters through miniature, minimalist comics.

Without using any words, they’ve managed to illustrate Bucky Barnes's plane explosion and subsequent transformation into the Winter Soldier, Jessica Jones’s car crash, the death of the Punisher’s family, and other classic stories from the major Marvel canon while paying tribute to the comic book form.

Explore the poster below, and see a zoomable version on Pop Chart Lab’s website.

A poster featuring 36 minimalist illustrations of superhero origin stories.
Pop Chart Lab

Keep your eyes open for future Marvel-Pop Chart crossovers. The Marvel Origins: A Sequential Compendium poster is “the first release of what we hope to be a marvelous partnership,” as Pop Chart Lab’s Galvin Chow puts it. Prints are available for pre-order starting at $37 and are scheduled to start shipping on March 8.

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Disney Enterprises, Inc.
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entertainment
Your $10 Donation Can Help an Underprivileged Child See A Wrinkle in Time for Free
Disney Enterprises, Inc.
Disney Enterprises, Inc.

Theater chain AMC is teaming with the Give a Child the Universe initiative to help underprivileged kids see A Wrinkle in Time for free through ticket donations. The initiative was started by Color of Change, a nonprofit advocacy group that designs “campaigns powerful enough to end practices that unfairly hold Black people back, and champion solutions that move us all forward.”

"Color of Change believes in the power of images and supports those working to change the rules in Hollywood so that inclusive, empathetic and human portrayals of black people and people of color are prominent on the screen,” the initiative’s executive director, Rashad Robinson, said in a statement:

Director Ava DuVernay’s A Wrinkle in Time is the perfect subject for the group because, as Robinson puts it, “By casting a black teenage actress, Storm Reid, as the heroine at the center of this story, the filmmakers and the studio send a powerful message to millions of young people who will see someone like them embracing their individuality and strength to save the world.”

The movie touts a diverse cast that includes Mindy Kaling, Oprah Winfrey, Reese Witherspoon, Zach Galifianakis, and Chris Pine. The most important member of the cast, though, is 14-year-old Storm Reid, who plays the main character Meg Murry, a young girl who tries to save her father (Pine) who is trapped in another dimension. The movie is based on the acclaimed 1962 fantasy novel by author Madeleine L'Engle.

If you’d like to donate a ticket (or more), you can just head over to the Give a Child the Universe website and pledge an amount. AMC will provide one ticket to children and teens nationwide for every $10 given to the cause.

And if you’re interested in seeing the movie yourself, A Wrinkle in Time opens on March 9, 2018.

[h/t E! Online]

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