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7 Wild 'Simpsons' Fan Conspiracy Theories

With a show as beloved and long-lasting as The Simpsons, fans are naturally going to let their imaginations run wild with the vast amount of information they are given. The following theories were made by fans and explain some of the show's more inexplicable aspects—and some do it more convincingly than others...

1. Homer is in a coma.

In the 1993 episode "So It's Come to This: A Simpsons Clip Show," Homer is crushed by a vending machine and falls into a coma. Everything is fine again at the end of the episode, but a recent fan theory argues that Homer never actually woke up from the coma. The original poster, Redditor /u/Hardtopickaname, cites a shift in the show's tone after this episode. Before the episode, plots usually centered around mundane events like "Bart cheats on an IQ test" and "Lisa has a crush on her teacher," but after the episode plots started to get more surreal and outlandish. Even more compelling, an earlier episode, "Homer The Heretic," ends with the following exchange between Homer and God:

Homer: God, I gotta ask you something. What's the meaning of life?
God: Homer, I can't tell you that.
Homer: C'mon!
God: You'll find out when you die.
Homer: I can't wait that long!
God: You can't wait six months?

"So It's Come to This: A Simpsons Clip Show" (April 1, 1993) aired six months after "Homer the Heretic" (October 8, 1992). Producer Al Jean has dismissed the theory.

2. All the Simpsons are geniuses.

A fan theory from Reddit hypothesizes that every member of the Simpsons is a genius, but only Lisa chooses to embrace it. Marge was shown to be an excellent student, but ultimately chose Homer and a family over a career. In the episode "HOMR," Homer became a genius after having a crayon removed from his brain, but chose to have the crayon re-inserted to avoid being ostracized by his friends. Even Bart is a genius (he's shown a natural aptitude for languages and complex schemes), but chose a life of debauchery, because, like Homer, he found it more satisfying. Lisa chooses to embrace her intelligence, while all the other Simpsons choose happiness.

3. Homer is still collecting royalties from The Be Sharps.

How are the Simpsons able to afford a large home, two nice cars, and hundreds of adventures and trips on Homer's salary? A theory from Reddit postulates that Homer still receives royalties from The Be Sharps, his Beatles-esque barbershop quartet from the episode "Homer's Barbershop Quartet." This theory is supported by the fact that the other members of the band (Barney, Apu, and Principal Skinner) also have unexplained wealth. Barney has a bar tab so high that only NASA can calculate it, Apu drives a nice sports car, and Principal Skinner lives in a nice house in an affluent area.

4. Maude Flanders is a sociopath.

According to a fan theory that first appeared on the No Homers fansite, Maude Flanders was a sociopath. The poster, Diversity Pumpkin, points to several scenes that suggest Maude hated Ned and wanted to kill her husband before her death in season 11. On several occasions—be it during a bear attack, imminent comet, or rooftop danger—Maude either left Ned for dead or showed no concern for him. After she passes away, the imprint on her bed is facing away from Ned, meaning that she spent every night facing away from her husband.

5. There are multiple Molemen.

Over The Simpsons' long run, Hans Moleman suffers repeated fatal injuries as a running joke. A theory, originally posted by the Redditor /u/arin3, suggests that each of the these Molemen is actually a different person. A commenter expands on this theory, writing, "They are a race of human-mole hybrids that live under Springfield. In their gradual attempts to take over the world they are taking up jobs one by one in Springfield. Luckily though, Homer's shenanigans kills them off as fast as they can come to the surface." The theory is further supported by the season 11 episode "Hello Gudder, Hello Fadder," where Homer encounters a race of underground Molemen.

6. The Simpsons live in Springfield, Maine.

In what state do the Simpsons live? This is one of the longest running mysteries of the show, but one dedicated internet detective believes they have found the correct answer. Using clues from the show and the process of elimination, the theory narrows down the Simpsons' home state to Maine. You can read the full explanation here.

7. Springfield exists outside time and space.

Another fan theory argues that Springfield isn't in any state, but actually exists outside of time and space. Known as the "Tesseract Theory," it states that Springfield exists within a tesseract and is constantly changing location. According to the poster, "This allows it to be much bigger than the space it takes up (West Springfield is three times the size of Texas) as well as shift location as needed. The town has been observed to shift its location anywhere in the lower 48 states." This also explains why landmarks like the Murderhorn can exist in one episode and be absent the next, and why the characters never age.

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D'oh! The Simpsons' Favorite Catchphrase, By the Numbers
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Fox

Between the iconic main characters and the dozens of offbeat supporting roles, the twisted citizens of Springfield have all given us plenty of quotable lines to use in our everyday lives over the years. But the most recognizable is also the shortest—Homer Simpson’s trademark “D’oh.” This three-letter utterance of annoyance became so universally beloved that it has made its way into both the Oxford English Dictionary and Merriam-Webster Dictionary, being defined as a word “used to express sudden recognition of a foolish blunder or an ironic turn of events.”

As The Simpsons celebrates 29 seasons on the air, the show continues to travel into uncharted waters for a comedy series. The folks over at TonerGiant—a company specializing in printing supplies—have decided to celebrate The Simpsons’s longevity by creating an infographic dedicated to all things “D’oh.” Here, you can learn how many times the catchphrase has been uttered, which episode it appears in most, and other assorted facts, including a bit on the show’s eerily accurate predictions for the future. Plus, if you’re looking to really become a student of Simpsons quotes, you can find out how much it would cost to print out every script from the show’s first 28 seasons.

So if you want to learn more about "D'oh," and some obscure Simpsons facts for your next trivia night, take a look at the infographic below:

Printing the classic Simpsons catchphrase
Provided by Toner Giant

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15 Facts About the First Episode of The Simpsons
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FOX

On December 17, 1989, The Simpsons premiered on FOX. Nearly 30 years later, the Simpson family and their fellow Springfield residents are still going strong. Let's look back at where it all started—"Simpsons Roasting on an Open Fire."

1. IT WAS SUPPOSED TO PREMIERE IN SEPTEMBER.

The Simpsons was originally planned to premiere earlier in the fall of 1989, but because of animation problems, the series began on December 17 with "Simpsons Roasting on an Open Fire." The original pilot, "Some Enchanted Evening," later aired as the season finale.

2. MARGE WAS SUPPOSED TO GET DRUNK.

According to Al Jean, the original premise of the episode was that "Homer was worried that Marge was going to get drunk at a party and get him in trouble at the office."

3. IT'S LACKING THE SERIES' NOW-FAMOUS OPENING SEQUENCE. 

The episode lacked the now-famous opening sequence, which was added in the second episode, "Bart the Genius," because creator Matt Groening thought a longer opening sequence would mean less animation.

4. GWEN STEFANI'S BROTHER PLAYED A KEY ROLE IN ITS CREATION.

One of the layout artists for "Simpsons Roasting on an Open Fire" was Eric Stefani, brother of Gwen Stefani and a founding member of No Doubt.

5. BARNEY LOOKED A BIT DIFFERENT.

In the first episode, Barney had yellow hair, which was the same color as his skin. This was later changed because the people behind the show thought that only members of the Simpson family should have yellow hair.

6. LISA REALLY WANTED A PONY.

Lisa asks for a pony six times on her Christmas list (it's her first line in the series). She would later get her pony in the season 3 episode "Lisa's Pony."

7. PART OF IT WAS INSPIRED BY MATT GROENING'S SECOND GRADE SCHOOL REPORT.

According to the DVD commentary, the "Santas of many lands" portion of the Christmas pageant was inspired by a second grade report Matt Groening did on Christmas in Russia.

8. IT DIDN'T INVENT THE ALTERNATE VERSION OF "JINGLE BELLS."

Additionally, Groening claims that this episode has been incorrectly credited with creating the "alternate version" of "Jingle Bells." (Bart sings, "Jingle Bells/Batman Smells/Robin Laid an Egg...")

9. IT WAS ONLY THE SECOND ANIMATED SERIES TO AIR IN PRIMETIME SINCE THE FLINTSTONES.

The Simpsons was just the second animated show to air in primetime since The Flintstones went off the air 23 years earlier. (The other was Wait Till Your Father Gets Home, which aired from 1972-1974.)

10. THE IDEA WAS CONCEIVED UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF ALCOHOL.

According to executive producer James L. Brooks, "The Simpsons series began like many things begin: with an animator getting drunk at a Christmas party ... We were already doing Tracey Ullman, and David Silverman, who was with us then and would go on to direct The Simpsons Movie, cornered me and poured out his heart about what having a primetime Simpsons show would mean to animators."

11. LISA WAS SUPPOSED TO BE A "LITTLE HELL-RAISER."

The Simpsons in 'The Town'
Fox

According to Al Jean, in the original shorts, "Lisa was supposed to be this little hell-raiser like Bart, but their character differentiation was wider when we went to full series."

12. YEARDLEY SMITH AUDITIONED FOR BART.

Yeardley Smith, the voice of Lisa, originally auditioned for Bart. "That lasted a good eight or nine seconds," Smith recounts, "It was like: "Cut, cut, cut! You sound too much like a girl!"

13. A SECOND CITY PERFORMANCE GOT DAN CASTELLANETA AN AUDITION.

Dan Castellaneta was invited to read for Homer Simpson after Tracey Ullman saw him perform a sketch comedy bit about a blind, crippled comedian at Second City in Chicago.

14. IT WAS MILHOUSE'S FIRST APPEARANCE, BUT HE ALREADY EXISTED.

"Simpsons Roasting on an Open Fire" is the first time Milhouse appeared on the show; however, he was featured in a Butterfinger commercial in 1988.

15. SANTA'S LITTLE HELPER WENT MISSING.

Because "Simpsons Roasting on an Open Fire" was originally meant to be the eighth episode, Santa's Little Helper is mysteriously absent from the next episode ("Bart the Genius"). According to DVD commentary, the creators of the show received letters of praise for heightening the awareness of the abandonment of racing dogs even though they didn't know it was a real problem when they created the episode.

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