15 Things You Might Not Know About The Legend of Zelda

Even if you spent hours with the iconic gold cartridge loaded into your NES, you can probably still learn a few things about Link’s epic adventure.

1. NINTENDO DIDN’T THINK THE GAME WOULD BE POPULAR IN AMERICA.

Although The Legend of Zelda had garnered positive feedback in Japan, Minoru Arakawa, the president of Nintendo’s American division, expressed doubt that U.S. players would have the patience for such a complex and challenging game. Arakawa was particularly concerned over the text-heavy game’s reliance on its players’ willingness to read!

2. THE STORY WAS INSPIRED BY ITS CREATOR’S CHILDHOOD.

Game design icon Shigeru Miyamoto borrowed from his own history to dream up Hyrule, the setting of The Legend of Zelda. He developed the game’s enchanted forests while thinking of his youth in a small village near Kyoto, where he spent much time exploring the nearby woodlands. Moreover, Miyamoto modeled the puzzling nature of Zelda’s many dungeons on his maze-like childhood home, which was riddled with indistinguishable paper doors.

3. IN SOME WAYS, ZELDA WAS DESIGNED AS THE “ANTI-MARIO.

You might be familiar with another Nintendo game that hit American shelves just a few months before Zelda: Super Mario Bros. The company, and in particular designers Miyamoto and Takashi Tezuka, developed the original Zelda and Mario outings simultaneously, working hard to ensure that the two felt very different. Where Super Mario Bros. was in every way a straightforward mission, Zelda was meant to confuse and provoke creative problem solving.

4. PRINCESS ZELDA HAS A FAMOUS NAMESAKE.

Despite being conceived in Japan, Zelda’s titular princess was named after a native Alabaman. Miyamoto confirmed that Zelda Fitzgerald—novelist, feminist, and wife of F. Scott Fitzgerald—was the inspiration for his Hyrulian heroine’s handle.

5. THERE IS SIGNIFICANCE TO LINK’S NAME, TOO.

Originally, The Legend of Zelda was meant to be a game that spanned in-universe time periods, beginning in the canonical “past” and ending up in the “future,” with the Triforce acting as a mode of transport between them. The series hero’s unusual moniker was meant to symbolize his role as a link between the eras.  But Nintendo’s current position is that he is a “link” between the player and the game.

6. SEVERAL OTHER ELEMENTS WERE DROPPED FROM THE ORIGINAL VERSION OF THE GAME.

Early incarnations of The Legend of Zelda were intended to include the option to design your own dungeons (ultimately scrapped when Nintendo realized that navigating existent dungeons was a lot more fun than building ones from scratch). Additionally, the original Japanese version of the game opened with the player receiving his or her sword outright, as opposed to earning it upon completion of an early cave level.

Another element that did not carry over to American game play from the Japanese version of the game was the inclusion of a working microphone. The device famously came in handy in defeating an enemy called Pols Voice, a rabbit-like ghost that inhabits several dungeons. The microphone, as suggested by the game’s instruction manual (which stated that Pols Voice “hated loud noises”), allowed players to defeat the creature. Without the availability of this option on the American console, however, the manual’s aforementioned tip was simply confusing.

7. MIYAMOTO TOOK AWAY THE SWORD AS “PUNISHMENT” FOR GAMER COMPLAINTS.

When Miyamoto caught wind that early test players were disgruntled by confusing game play and unclear objectives, he decided to up the ante by forcing players to earn Link’s sword via triumph over a complicated cave level before beginning the adventure in earnest. Miyamoto predicted that such a mystery would give a clear first mission and prompt communication between individual players, with successful strategies spreading by word of mouth.

8. THAT SAID, YOU DON’T ACTUALLY NEED THE SWORD TO COMPLETE MOST OF THE GAME.

Technically, you can get through the bulk of The Legend of Zelda without use of Link’s sword. The only component that requires its use is the final boss battle against Ganon, who can only be harmed by this weapon.

9. THE GAME SHARES ELEMENTS WITH A FEW OTHER FAVORITES.

Although Miyamoto toiled to keep The Legend of Zelda and Super Mario Bros. as distinct as possible, there is at least one minor example of crossover. The “Piranha Plant” enemy best known as the pipe-dwelling pest that litters the original Super Mario game (as well as most subsequent games) rears its head at a few points in Zelda.

Zelda returned the favor to the Mario franchise, lending Super Mario Bros. 3 the sound effect for its world-hopping magic whistle. The sound was developed in association with the recorder device found in The Legend of Zelda.

10. THE TRIFORCE IS MODELED AFTER THE JAPANESE SYMBOL MITSUUROKO.

Present in every Zelda game, the three-triangle symbol is actually modeled after the emblem of the Hōjō clan, a tremendously powerful family in 13th- and 14th-century Japan. The emblem was known as the Mitsuuroko, which translates to “the Three Dragon Scales.”

11. NINTENDO ALMOST WENT WITH A DIFFERENT THEME SONG.

The game’s creators originally intended to use French composer Maurice Ravel’s composition Boléro as the score for the game, but Nintendo couldn’t nab the rights to the number. As such, brilliant in-house composer Koji Kondo whipped up what is now one of the company’s most beloved tunes.

12. EVERYONE WHO WORKED ON THE GAME WAS CREDITED UNDER A PSEUDONYM.

Well, except for executive producer Hiroshi Yamauchi. It was not particularly uncommon practice at the time for game designers in Japan to receive attribution via moniker as opposed to their proper names, due to companies’ fear of talent poaching. Miyamoto is credited as “S. Miyahon,” Tezuka as “Ten Ten,” Kondo as “Konchan,” and programmer I. Marui as “Marumaru,” among others.

13. THE DUNGEONS FIT TOGETHER QUITE NEATLY.

Every dungeon in Zelda’s main quest bears a distinct shape, generally befitting that of its namesake (i.e., “The Lion” is shaped like a lion). That said, all nine dungeons, when fit together onscreen, add up to a perfect rectangle. This isn’t simply a nod to Nintendo’s particularly anal-retentive players, it is a means of compacting console data.

14. ZELDA WAS THE FIRST GAME TO FEATURE A COMPLETE “SECOND QUEST.”

While other games, particularly Super Mario Bros., offered the option to replay a more difficult version of the same game that differed only in details like the number of villains populating levels, Zelda was the first to offer a completely different second terrain on the same cartridge. You don’t even have to beat the game to access “Second Quest.” You can reach it immediately by naming your game play file “Zelda.”

15. SOMEBODY BEAT THE WHOLE GAME IN HALF AN HOUR.

On February 27, 2015, a user known as “Lackattack24” completed the entirety of The Legend of Zelda (minus the “Second Quest”) in 30 minutes and six seconds.

5 Odd Suggestions About How To Fight the Dust Bowl

It was a disaster of mankind’s own making. By the 1930s, chronic overfarming in the Great Plains had devastated the native grasses that had held topsoils in place. As the plants were uprooted, the dirt dried and loosened, setting the stage for an environmental catastrophe.

In 1931, a drought hit the region—it would last eight years—and the exposed soil was blown away by a series of gigantic dust storms. Mountain-sized dirt clouds became a common sight all over Oklahoma, Texas, Kansas, Colorado, and New Mexico. Nobody who lived there had ever experienced anything like it: skies were blackened, barnyards were buried, and millions of farmers became homeless refugees. As the crisis raged on, people piped up with some wild ideas about how to finally put an end to this “dust bowl.” Here are five of the most peculiar suggestions.

1. PAVE OVER THE GREAT PLAINS.

Many well-meaning citizens assumed that if they could just cover up the loose dirt somehow, it would stop getting blown around so much. New Jersey’s Barber Asphalt Company reached out to the federal government and offered to pave over the afflicted area. Their price? Five dollars per acre. Sounds like a bargain—until you consider the fact that the dust bowl had engulfed around 100 million acres. Meanwhile, a Pittsburgh steel manufacturer wanted to install wire netting over multiple counties, and a company known as Sisalkraft proposed blanketing the ground with its rugged brand of waterproof paper. A similar idea involved laying concrete down over every field in the region and leaving a few holes for future crops.

2. COVER THE TERRAIN WITH BROKEN-DOWN CARS.

One North Carolinian’s suggestion ideally would have killed two birds with one stone. As environmental historian Donald Worster wrote in his book Dust Bowl: The Southern Plains in the 1930s, “Mrs. M.L. Yearby of Durham, North Carolina saw an opportunity to beautify her own state by shipping its junked autos out to the plains to anchor the blowing fields.”

3. BOMB THE SKY.


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Explosives expert Tex Thornton tried ending the drought with dynamite. In a sales pitch given to the citizens of Dalhart, Texas, he explained that if the explosive was launched skywards and detonated aerially, immediate rainfall would follow. Embracing Thornton’s idea, the town gave him $300 to cover his expenses. Judgment day came on May 1, 1935, when the would-be hero set up shop by a local lake. Thousands of curious onlookers watched from afar as Thornton tied balloons to his dynamite sticks, which had been fitted with timed fuses.

Things quickly went awry once a violent dust storm arrived on the scene. The high winds made it too dangerous for Thornton to even think about releasing the explosives, especially now that a crowd was present. So in a last-ditch effort to deliver the goods, he buried his dynamite and set it off under the ground. Thornton’s Plan B backfired spectacularly: The blast just propelled extra dirt into the dusty atmosphere.

After a few more attempts, rain did come to Dalhart—as well as in regions too far away to be affected by his explosions. A victorious Thornton left Dalhart supposedly saying, “I’m mighty glad that the people of Dalhart and the Panhandle got moisture—and if I had anything to do with it, I’m doubly glad."

4. USE DEAD REPTILES AS YARD DECOR.

Contemporary folklore claimed that if you hung a deceased snake belly-up over a fence post, it would rain the next morning. When all else failed, some farmers actually tried this during the dust bowl years. Ironically, live snakes would have been far more useful to them. Back then, famished jackrabbits regularly turned up in droves to devour the few crops that were still being grown on the Great Plains. In western Kansas, the situation was so bad that citizens responded by organizing what became known as “jackrabbit drives.” Those involved formed huge lines and marched side-by-side for miles on end. Using their own bodies, they’d corral every rabbit in sight into an enclosure and club them to death. Yet if the species’ natural predators—like certain snakes—had been a bit more common, this drastic measure might not have been necessary. Who knows?

5. BRING THE RAIN WITH A FAUX MILITARY BATTLE.

Many of the more intense showdowns in the American Civil War, including Gettysburg, were followed by severe rainfall. This and other accounts over the years helped give rise to the once widespread belief that artillery caused downpours—a notion that was still fairly pervasive in the 1930s (and was broadly the same hypothesis that Thornton was working with).

One soldier from Denver petitioned the federal government for $20 million worth of ammunition, after which he would round up 40,000 members of the Civilian Conservation Corps for a couple of phony battles. After some non-lethal cannon fire, the rains would return—or at least, that was the plan.

“Try it, if it works, send me a check for $5000 for services rendered,” wrote the soldier.

This story originally ran in 2016.

10 Fun Facts About Corgis

iStock/Lisa_Nagorskaya
iStock/Lisa_Nagorskaya

You already know they’re cute, compact, and smart. But there’s a lot more to these beloved little dogs that you might not know. 

1. THERE ARE TWO DISTINCT BREEDS OF CORGIS.

There are two types of Welsh corgis: the Pembroke Welsh corgi and the Cardigan Welsh corgi. They are considered two entirely different breeds because they come from different ancestors. Their remarkable resemblance is a result of crossbreeding in the 19th century.   

If you’re trying to tell the two breeds apart, the most notable difference is that the Pembroke does not have a tail. On top of a tail, Cardigan Welsh corgis also have rounded ears, while Pembrokes generally have pointy ears. 

2. THE CARDIGAN WELSH CORGI IS THE OLDER BREED.

Photo of a Welsh Corgi Cardigan
iStock/Silense

A warrior tribe of Celts brought the corgis in their aboriginal form to Cardiganshire, Wales around 1200 BCE, which means corgis have been in Wales for over 3000 years. This early breed was a member of the Teckel family of dogs that went on to include the dachshund. 

3. PEMBROKE WELSH CORGIS HAVE A CONSIDERABLE HISTORY AS WELL.

welsh Corgi Pembroke sitting in autumn leaves
iStock/HelenaQueen

Although no one knows for sure, most agree that the Pembroke Welsh corgi dates back to 1107 CE when Flemish weavers migrated to Wales. The Spitz-type dog bred with the original Cardigan corgis to produce the Pembroke Welsh corgis we know today. 

4. THE KENNEL CLUB ORIGINALLY LUMPED THE TWO BREEDS TOGETHER.

The two types of corgis were registered as one in 1925, leading to a lot of stress among breeders. Often a judge would favor one breed over the other, which would lead to controversies at dog shows. After nearly a decade of (pretty adorable) strife, the breeds gained separate recognition in 1934. 

5. CORGIS WERE ORIGINALLY USED AS HERDERS.


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The Welsh used the short dogs as herders as early as the 10th century. In those days, pastures were considered common land, so there were no fences. In order to keep a farmer’s cattle together and separated from other herds, corgis would nip at their legs to herd them. Because of their closeness to the ground, corgis had easy access to the cows’ ankles and were difficult targets of the retaliatory kicks of cattle. 

6. ACCORDING TO WELSH LEGEND, FAIRIES RIDE THEM.

Some say that the corgi is an “enchanted dog” favored by fairies and elves. At night the magical creatures would use the dogs to pull their carriages and be their steeds in battle. According to legend, the markings on a corgi’s coat suggest the faint outline of a saddle and harness. 

7. THE ROYAL FAMILY LOVES THE PEMBROKE WELSH CORGI.


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Queen Elizabeth II has had more than 30 corgis in her lifetime. Though her last two corgis—Whisper and Willow—have both recently passed away, she does still have two dorgis (corgi/dachshund mixes) named Candy and Vulcan.

The Queen met her first corgi when King George VI brought a male pooch home from a kennel in 1933. Named Dookie, the dog was an immediate hit with the future queen and her sister, Princess Margaret. 

After a second corgi named Jane entered the picture, the canine couple had a litter of puppies, two of which were kept. The Queen received another dog named Susan for her 18th birthday—from there, the collection of corgis really gained momentum. Some of the royal corgis bred with Princess Margaret’s dachshund Pipkin to create dorgis.

8. CORGIS WERE USED TO PREDICT PRINCESS CHARLOTTE'S NAME.

In the spring of 2015, when Prince William and Kate Middleton were awaiting the birth of their second child, people are already taking bets on the name. Gambling company Ladbrokes used corgis in an attempt to predict what the name would be. The company’s ad featured 10 corgis wearing vests with different names in a race to predict what the name of the child would be. The corgi sporting the name Alexandra won the race. Princess Charlotte was born on May 2, 2015.

9. CORGI MEANS "DWARF DOG" IN WELSH.

According to the Oxford English Dictionary, cor means dwarf and gi means dog.  

10. SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA HOSTS A ENORMOUS CORGI MEETUP.


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SoCal Corgi Beach Day started as a humble meet-up event at Huntington Beach in 2012. The first event attracted just 15 dogs; the last one had more than 1100 corgis in attendance. The event happens three times a year.

An earlier version of this article ran in 2015.

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