10 Common Misconceptions About Allergies

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iStock

In this video from our YouTube archives, host Elliott Morgan clears up some misconceptions about allergies (unfortunately, he can't do anything about your sinuses). Transcript courtesy of Nerdfighteria.

Hi, I'm Elliott, this is mental_floss on YouTube, and today, I'm going to talk about some misconceptions about allergies.

Misconception #1: Blood tests are the best way to determine food allergies. Actually, 50 to 60 percent of blood tests will give a false positive result when it comes to food allergies. The best way to find out if someone is allergic to food is to do a test called an oral food challenge, which I know sounds like a challenge some YouTuber made up, but I promise it's real. In an OFC, an allergist feeds their patient small doses of whichever food is thought to be an allergen. After observation, the dose is increased. This gets repeated. Of course, if a reaction shows, the patient gets treated, and if there's no reaction, then there's no allergy, congratulations!

Misconception #2: Food allergies are uncommon. According to the Food Allergy Research and Education Organization, 15 million people in the United States suffer from a food allergy. Even more surprising is that 1 in 13 kids has one. In case you're starting to wonder if you may be one of those people, I'll let you know what you should look for. Ninety percent of food allergies are one of these eight foods: milk, soy, eggs, wheat, peanuts, tree nuts, fish, and shellfish.

Misconception #3: Penicillin allergies are common. You might think you're allergic to penicillin just like 1 in 10 adults who claim to be, but don't be so sure. In a study done at the Cleveland Clinic, 21 of 24 patients who said that they were allergic to penicillin received negative results when they were given a skin test. So almost 90 percent of them were wrong about their allergy. This is probably because they had a reaction to the drug when they were younger, but allergies sometimes just go away, which brings me to ...

Misconception #4: Allergies are for life. Some people develop allergies as they get older; on the other hand, some people just outgrow allergies. In fact, over a quarter of children in the U.S. outgrow their food allergies. It typically happens before they turn 10 years old, but it could happen at any time.

Misconception #5: People who are allergic to shellfish can't do CT scans. Some people believe that their shellfish allergy means they shouldn't have a computerized tomography scan. Before a CT scan, a patient must ingest or be given a dye or contrast, which contains iodine. Shellfish also contain iodine, but studies show that people who are allergic to shellfish are actually intolerant of proteins in the animals rather than iodine, but some doctors still will avoid giving these patients a contrast with iodine in it.

Misconception #6: Babies shouldn't be given allergenic foods before they turn one. The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology recommends exactly the opposite. They claim that giving babies food like peanut butter, fish, and eggs when they're four to six months old might actually help prevent future food allergies, but this is a relatively new finding and it hasn't been thoroughly studied, so if you have a baby, you should probably just like, talk to your doctor, OK, and see what they say about this kind of stuff, they're usually really smart, they went to a lot of school.

Misconception #7: Allergic reactions come from allergens. You can actually blame your immune system for those pesky hives. Once your body inhales, eats, or comes into contact with an allergen, the immune system misidentifies it as this harmful substance. Then, it makes antibodies which attack the allergen, so the allergen isn't attacking your body, it's actually the other way around.

Misconception #8: You know how you'll react to an allergen. Allergies are unpredictable. Someone who usually has a minor intolerance to an allergen still risks a more serious reaction, like anaphylaxis.

Misconception #9: Animal hair is an allergen. If you're allergic to an animal, it's probably their dander, saliva, and/or urine, gross, that's giving you trouble. Dander gets shed from the body, and it's made of skin cells, and it contains proteins that some immune systems don't like, but I should mention that animal hair can contain dander or other allergens including pollen and dust, so it's still worth vacuuming like, once every always. Always vacuum.

Misconception #10: Mediation is the only way to treat allergies. Some other treatment options include shots and sublingual immunotherapy, or if your allergies are seasonal or related to your home, you could try like a humidifier or maybe getting rid of your carpet or your dog.

Thanks for watching Misconceptions on Mental Floss on YouTube, which is made with the help of all of these nice people. If you have a topic for an upcoming Misconceptions episode that you would like to see, leave it in the comments, and I will see you next week. Bye.

[Images and footage provided by Shutterstock.]

Watch 32,000 Dominos Fall in an Extremely Satisfying Way

iStock/Khongtham
iStock/Khongtham

Lily Hevesh, known as Hevesh5 on YouTube, has achieved viral fame many times over with her ambitious domino videos. She's shown us dominos falling up a flight of stairs, dominoes toppling in a three-part spiral, and dominos collapsing in a continuous chain of record-breaking length. To make the video below, she collaborated with six fellow domino artists and set up an elaborate, freestyle design that leads to a domino fall that's incredibly satisfying to watch.

According to the video's description, this was the biggest project Hevesh and her collaborators built during a domino event she hosted earlier in 2019. The artists—which in addition to Hevesh5, included YouTube creators NC Domino, StickTrickDominoDude, Chris Wright, Jaytar42, jackofallspades98, and SmileyPeaceFun—gave themselves three-and-a-half days to set up 32,000 dominos using the most oddly satisfying domino tricks they knew.

Hevesh writes in the video description: "Everything in this setup (besides one field) was freestyled so we did not draw out a detailed floor plan. All we had was a list of satisfying domino project ideas that we built and connected on the spot."

In less than four minutes, the video showcases pyramids, spirals, and artistic patterns, all made from toppling plastic bricks. Whether or not you can name all the domino tricks that are featured, seeing them in action is mesmerizing. You can watch the full video below, and then subscribe to Hevesh5 for more domino creations.

Watch What Happens When Mannequins Misuse Fireworks

martaland/iStock via Getty Images
martaland/iStock via Getty Images

With the Fourth of July comes all the requisite warnings about fireworks safety. These sometimes-legal (check your local laws) explosives can provide a rapturous end to holiday festivities and events. They can also end in emergency room bills and tragedy.

This week, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) set up a demonstration to illustrate how quickly the mishandling of fireworks can go wrong, and it looks like something out of the opening sequence in Saving Private Ryan:

These mannequins violate a number of safe practices for fireworks, including pointing them directly at the heads of friends and peering into the mouth of a mortar tube. There’s also a caution about trying to make fireworks at home, which can have roof-blasting consequences.

While the dummies in the video exhibit poor judgment, their sacrifice might help humans avoid a similar fate. According to the CPSC, 280 people end up in the emergency room per day in the month around July 4 as a result of fireworks-related mishaps. Hands and fingers make up most of the injuries (28 percent), with legs (24 percent) and eyes (19 percent) also being vulnerable. Nearly half (44 percent) of injuries are burns. All told, 12,900 people were treated for fireworks wounds in 2017 [PDF].

To avoid injury, it’s best to avoid fireworks that come wrapped in brown paper, since those are typically made for professional use only. It’s also a good idea to keep children away from sparklers, which can burn in excess of 2000 degrees Fahrenheit. (If you would not hand your child a blowtorch, it’s probably not a good idea to hand them a sparkler.) If you must light a firework, do it and then get as far away from it as possible.

The CPSC has capped consumer fireworks so that they contain no more than 50 milligrams of powder. More formidable explosives, like cherry bombs and M-80s, have been banned by the federal government. Most states allow at least some fireworks to be sold and used.

If the mannequins really wanted protection from accidents, they should have moved to Massachusetts; it’s the only state where all consumer fireworks are banned.

[h/t CBS Denver]

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