Russia Woke Up to Two Extra Suns

Анюза Айбашева / Via youtube.com

Tuesday morning, Russian citizens were surprised to wake up to two more suns than usual.

Thankfully, the sun has not multiplied (although honestly, I could use the extra warmth right now). This phenomenon is a result of an optical illusion; the hexagonal ice crystals in the air refracted the light from the sun to make it seem like the sun was tripled. The invisible ice bits are a result of the extreme cold— it was around negative 23 degrees Celsius (negative 9.4 degrees Fahrenheit for fellow Americans).

This natural event isn't exactly uncommon. The false suns are known as sun dogs, and Wikimedia has a whole collection of them. Regardless, the solar canines were a big hit on social media:

[h/t: Buzzfeed.com / BBC.com]

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Days Inn
Days Inn's New LED Umbrella Makes Gloomy Days Sunnier
Days Inn
Days Inn

Taking a walk outside is a quick way to feel better—unless it's raining. If you're someone who loves sunshine and clear skies, you may use gloomy weather as an excuse to lock yourself indoors for the whole day. A new type of umbrella from Days Inn may prompt you to reconsider. The hotel chain's Days InnBrella uses built-in LED strips to provide you with a personal patch of light even on the dreariest days.

The new product takes the umbrella's timelessly practical design one step further. As the fabric keeps you dry, the interior lights each generate 4000 LUX (a unit used to measure the amount of light striking a surface). It's no replacement for bright sunlight, but its glow should hopefully give you the mood boost you need the next time you're walking in the rain.

Woman with illuminated umbrella.
Days Inn

If you're over 18 and have a Twitter account, you're eligible to win a free Days InnBrella of your own. Just retweet this tweet from Days Inn before June 26 to enter the contest. The five winners will be selected on June 27.

Days Inn isn't the first brand to give the classic umbrella an upgrade. KAZbrella stays drip-free by closing inside-out, and Oombrella gives weather forecasts and alerts you when you leave it behind.

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iStock
Why Does the Sky Look Green Before a Tornado?
iStock
iStock

A common bit of folklore from tornado-prone parts of the U.S. says that when the skies start taking on an emerald hue, it's time to run inside. But why do tornadoes tend to spawn green skies in the first place? As SciShow's Michael Aranda explains, the answer has to do with the way water droplets reflect the colors of the light spectrum.

During the day, the sky is usually blue because the shorter, bluer end of the light spectrum bounces off air molecules better than than redder, longer-wavelength light. Conditions change during the sunset (and sunrise), when sunlight has to travel through more air, and when storms are forming, which means there are more water droplets around.

Tornadoes forming later in the day, around sunset, do a great job of reflecting the green part of the light spectrum that's usually hidden in a sunset because of the water droplets in the clouds, which bounce green light into our eyes. But that doesn't necessarily mean a twister is coming—it could just mean a lot of rain is in the forecast. Either way, heading inside is probably a good idea.

For the full details on how water and light conspire to turn the sky green before a storm, check out the SciShow video below.

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