11 of the Greatest Class Pranks in History

Any group of subversive students can cover campus trees with toilet paper or make a series of prank calls. These 11 school pranks went above and beyond, and that's what makes them the stuff of mischief legend.

1. Lady Liberty Takes a Soaking

In the spring of 1978, two students at the University of Wisconsin ran for student government as candidates of the facetious Pail and Shovel Party. To their astonishment, they got elected. Like all good leaders, the pair vowed to make good on their campaign promise, which was to move the Statue of Liberty from New York City to Lake Mendota near campus. No one took them seriously until…one day in February, rising up out of the frozen lake was Lady Liberty herself. Her gigantic green head and glowing torch floated above the icy surface. The two pranksters told everyone that they’d had the statue flown in by helicopter, but the cable holding it had broken and Lady Liberty crashed through the ice. The real story: They had the statue built out of wire, papier maché, and plywood and then hauled it onto the lake.

2. Card Trick

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As far as we know, you can’t actually major in pranks at college. But if you attend the California Institute of Technology, you can come close. The school is famous for its brilliantly engineered pranks, and the Rose Bowl Hoax of 1961 is perhaps the crème de la crème.

As usual, the Caltech football team did not stand a chance of actually playing in the storied Rose Bowl game in 1961. But a group of students decided to get Caltech in on the action anyway. They learned that the Washington Huskies cheerleaders were planning a halftime stunt where their fans would hold up colored cards in prearranged patterns to spell out a series of pro-Husky messages. A Caltech student managed to liberate the master plan for the stunt while the Huskies were visiting Disneyland the day before the big game. CalTech pranksters then replaced the plan with their own, revised version.

The next day at halftime, the Washington fans started performing the card stunts. The first 11 stunts were just as the Huskies had planned. Then things went awry: The 12th stunt was supposed to be the team’s dog mascot. Instead, the cards formed the unmistakable silhouette of a beaver, the Caltech mascot. Stunt 13 spelled out HUSKIES, only backwards. In the final stunt, gigantic letters filled the stands—and TV screens across America—with, you guessed it: CALTECH.

3. A Tough Parking Spot

Like Caltech, MIT is famous for its audacious, tech-savvy pranksters. Over the years, students have placed many objects on top of the campus’s 15-story Great Dome, including a fake cow, a piano, a small house, and a giant nipple. In 1994, they managed to park a campus police car, complete with a dummy officer in the driver’s seat, on the curved roof. To do it, they took the car apart, hauled the pieces up the side of the building using a system of rollers, then reassembled the vehicle and even got the lights on the roof to flash. Then they placed a ticket on the windshield, since after all, the car was in a no-parking zone.

4. Politicians Are Animals

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Most college pranks have relatively trivial consequences, but in 1959, a group of students in Sao Paolo, Brazil, managed to swing an election when they got a five-year-old rhinoceros named Cacareco elected to city council. The four-legged candidate won by a landslide, garnering 100,000 votes—one of the highest totals for a local candidate in Brazil’s history to that point. The students had ballots printed up with Cacareco’s name on them and then got thousands of voters to send them in. “Better to elect a rhino than an ass,” commented one voter.

After Cacareco won, the head of the zoo where she lived demanded that the rhino receive a councilman’s salary, but the election was nullified before any paychecks were cut. Today Cacareco’s memory lives on in the expression “Voto Cacareco,” which is used in some parts of Brazil to mean “protest vote.”

5. Flaming Undies

As the Olympic Torch neared the end of its 1,695 mile-journey to Melbourne, Australia in the summer of 1956, it had already faced several challenges, including torrential rains and temperatures so high that the runners carrying it nearly collapsed. But nothing beat what happened when the Olympic flame arrived in the city of Sydney. A champion runner named Harry Dillon was scheduled to carry the torch into the city and present it to Mayor Pat Hills. Some 30,000 people lined the streets, waiting for Dillon’s arrival. At last, a runner came sprinting into the city. The crowd cheered as he made his way to the podium and handed the torch over to the mayor. The mayor quickly launched into his speech without giving the torch a second glance until someone whispered in his ear, “That’s not the torch.” The mayor looked down and realized that he was holding a fake torch, constructed from a wooden chair leg painted silver and a can stuffed with a pair of kerosene-soaked underwear.

By then, the man who had delivered the fraudulent torch had disappeared. He was Barry Larkin, a student at the University of Sydney, who along with eight other students felt that people were overly reverent about the torch and that the tradition was ripe for ridicule. The mayor took the prank in good humor, and minutes later the official torchbearer arrived. Larkin received a standing ovation when he returned to his college along with a “Good job, son!” from the headmaster.

6. Gotcha, Captcha!

When your college’s mascot is a concrete brick with arms and legs named Wally the Wart, it is imperative that you win the Victoria’s Secret “Pink Collegiate Collection” contest so Wally’s image can grace some fashionable lingerie. Or at least that’s what students at Harvey Mudd College thought when they heard about the contest in 2009. The contest website was set up so that people could cast only one vote a day, which put colleges with large student bodies at an advantage. But the site’s flawed security put colleges with a high quotient of tech wizards who like to pull pranks at an even greater advantage. A group of Mudders went to work and wrote a computer program that bypassed the CAPTCHA and automatically cast a vote every 2 or 3 seconds. Suddenly HMC, with fewer than 800 students, was at the top of the list, with over a million votes. That wasn’t enough for the HMC pranksters. They rigged the voting so that the schools in second through fifth places spelled out the acronym WIBSTR, which stands for “West Is Best, Screw the Rest,” the motto of a famously wild dorm at HMC. Not surprisingly, HMC was disqualified from the contest, and Wally is still waiting for his underwear op.

7. All America Hoaxers

When Steve Noll was a junior at the College of William and Mary in 1972, he and his friends loved college basketball, but they hated the fact that the top honor for players involved being named to All America teams by national sports journalists. The students were just as unhappy that their own school’s top player, guard Mike Arizin, would never make one of those teams. Noll and three friends decided to correct the situation themselves. They formed the Association of Collegiate Basketball Writers (even though none of them had ever penned a word about sports) and they invented the Leo G. Hershberger Award, which they named for a cigar-smoking New York City sportswriter who never existed. The four spent hours poring over player stats to select their team of honorees, which included, of course, Mike Arizin. They designed an official-looking certificate, and stationery bearing the slogan “Serving the Sport.” When every detail was perfect, they told the Associated Press about the award, and soon the news was in every major paper in the country. Then the pranksters shut their mouths. For forty years. They didn’t reveal the award was a hoax until 2013, on the eve of the Final Four tournament. Most of the winners said they were surprised but amused to learn that the award was a fake—and Mike Arzin decided he was “sort of flattered.”

8. Tetris on Steroids

Some pranks make you laugh out loud while others make you grin in quiet awe. The gigantic, playable Tetris game that lit up one side of the 21-story Green building on the MIT campus one April night in 2012 is one of the latter. MIT pranksters had dreamed about achieving this “Holy Grail” of hacks since at least 1993. It took a large team of students more than four years of work to finally pull it off. They installed custom color-changing LED lights in 153 of the building’s windows and connected them wirelessly to a podium where players controlled the game. This game was not for the timid: Upon losing, all the blocks would fall to the bottom of the building and all of Boston could watch the player's failure from across the Charles River.

9. A Pregnant Pause

Aquinas College economics professor Stephan Barrows did not like his students answering their cell phones during class, so he had a rule: If your phone rings, you must answer it on speakerphone. He should have had another rule: No prank calls. On April 1, 2014, students arranged to have a friend call a female student named Taylor Nefcy during class. As required, Nefcy put the call on speakerphone.

“Hi, this is Kevin from the Pregnancy Resource Center,” the voice on the other end said, as Nefcy’s friends switched on their hidden recorders. “Per your request, I am calling to inform you that the test results have come back positive. Congratulations!”

Professor Barrows, who had been smiling until then, suddenly became anxious and suggested that Nefcy might want to “shut that down.” But Nefcy let the call continue and Kevin explained that with the father “no longer in the picture,” the center would provide Nefcy with counseling and maternity services at no charge.

At this point, Barrows attempted to interrupt, and Nefcy politely told the caller, “Thank you, I’ll call back later.” Barrows then launched into a sober apology, but before he could get very far, Nefcy brushed him off: “That’s okay, I’ve been expecting this call,” she said, adding sweetly, “I already know what I’m going to name the baby. The first name will be April, and the middle name will be Fools.” Barrows lost it, along with the rest of the class, and the video promptly went viral.

10. Veterans of Future Wars

In 1936, Congress passed a controversial bill allowing veterans of World War I to receive their war bonuses 10 years early due to the economic hardships of the Great Depression. With another war brewing in Europe, two Princeton University students formed an impromptu group called Veterans of Future Wars. They demanded that draft-eligible men receive $1,000 payments in advance. They reasoned that they would likely be called into the military soon, and they might as well get the money when they could still enjoy it. The idea hit a nerve, and soon there were 500 chapters on campuses across the country. They adopted the group’s satirical salute: an arm outstretched, palm up, towards Washington. Eleanor Roosevelt admired the hoax, calling it a “grand pricking of a lot of bubbles.” But many real veterans did not see the humor. “They’re too yellow to go to war,” scoffed VFW Commander James E. Van Zandt. He misjudged the pranksters, however. The two founders and nearly all members of the Princeton chapter ended up serving in World War II.

11. A Traffic-Stopping Prank

In 2006, students at Austin High School in Austin, Minnesota engineered a prank that capitalized on the unusual architecture of their school. A busy street separates two buildings on the school’s campus. Students can use the crosswalk or an underground tunnel to get from one building to the other. At an appointed time on the day of the prank, 94 students began filing across the street, using the crosswalk. Then they circled back through the underground tunnel and crossed the street again—and again, and again—creating an endless stream of pedestrians. Traffic was tied up for nearly 10 minutes as cars lined up waiting for the students (including one dressed as a cow and another as a chicken) to finish crossing.

12 Back-to-School Products to Add to Your Shopping List

Kritchanut/iStock via Getty Images
Kritchanut/iStock via Getty Images

Before you know it, your long days (and often longer nights) will be booked with group projects, research papers, and probably some social events, too. It can be difficult to adjust to the sudden onslaught of new responsibilities that come during back-to-school season, but it can help if you feel prepared. Take a look at our 2019 must-have school supplies list to ensure that you’re well-equipped for whatever the fall semester throws at you.

1. Rocketbook Everlast Fusion; $35-$37

Rocketbook everlast fusion
Amazon

Do yourself and the environment a favor and check out the Rocketbook Everlast Fusion, a notebook with 42 reusable pages that will prevent you from ever having to buy another sheet of paper. With seven different page templates for planning, listing, goal-setting, note-taking, sketching, scheduling, and sharing big ideas, the Rocketbook is perfect for students of all ages and disciplines. It comes with one erasable Pilot FriXion pen, and you can also use any other Pilot FriXion utensils on it, markers and highlighters included. What happens when you’ve written on all 42 pages and you’d like to save your work? Simply scan your pages with the free Rocketbook app and upload them to the cloud service of your choice—Google Drive, Dropbox, Evernote, Slack, iCloud, and more. You can get the executive-sized, 6-inch-by-8.8-inch Rocketbook for $35, or the regular letter-sized, 8.5-inch-by-11-inch version for $37.

Buy it: Amazon

2. Bob Ross Agenda; $16

Bob Ross agenda
Amazon

Because Bob Ross understands the importance of going with the flow, this calendar agenda lists only the days of the week, but no dates. Don’t feel like writing anything down in October? Skip it completely without the guilt of seeing blank pages in your planner. Each two-page spread pairs the days of the week on one side with a picturesque, tranquil Bob Ross painting on the other. You can also personalize your calendar entries with Bob Ross-themed stickers included in the back of the agenda, featuring catchphrases like “Be a gentle whisper,” “Just relax and watch it happen,” and “Let’s get crazy!”

Buy it: Amazon

3. Wild Rose Large Planner; $37

papersource wild rose large planner
Paper Source

For those happy to adhere to a date-specific planner, here’s a lovely gold-accented floral option from Paper Source. The 7-inch-by-8.5-inch agenda includes both monthly and weekly calendar pages, so you can see the big-picture overview of your month as well as your day-by-day tasks. There are pages for notes, important dates, and contacts, plus a pocket folder, ruler, and quotes to inspire you. And, because we all love a bit of decoration, there are sticker sheets in the back that feature dainty doodles of flowers, champagne glasses, and more.

Buy it: Paper Source

4. Bluetooth Portable Keyboard; $45-$55

Bluetooth plugable portable foldable keyboard
Amazon

Unburden yourself (and your possibly overstuffed tote bag) from the need to carry around both your tablet and laptop by investing in this portable Bluetooth keyboard that folds into a package smaller than a paperback book and has separate compatibility modes for Android, iOS, and Windows. You only have to charge it once every few weeks, but don’t worry about forgetting—you can always plug it right into your device with the included USB cord. The handy gadget also comes with a case, which doubles as a stand for your electronic device. Though the 11.5-inch-long standard-sized keyboard might be the first choice for those with standard-sized fingers, there’s also a 10-inch compact option for fans of especially miniature things.

Buy it: Amazon

5. National Park Foundation Water Bottle; $40

National Parks Foundation water bottle
DICK'S Sporting Goods

These hip Hydro Flask water bottles are each decorated with a design of one of America’s most cherished national parks, including the Grand Canyon, Yellowstone, Great Smoky Mountains, Joshua Tree, and Olympic National Parks. The 21-ounce, stainless-steel bottles feature double-walled vacuum insulation that will not only keep your beverage hot for up to 12 hours or cold for 24, but will also prevent condensation from forming on the bottle and soaking whatever park pamphlets you’ve got tucked inside your backpack.

Buy it: DICK’S Sporting Goods

6. Herschel Backpack; $56-$80

herschel navy backpack
Amazon

Herschel backpacks have become a standard for students, professionals, and practically all other people, in part because there’s a color or pattern to match every unique personality. In addition to representing your individuality, they’ll also last you many years, keep your shoulders comfortable with padded straps, and provide you with the perfect amount of space to store your laptop, schoolbooks, case files, overnight toiletries, and snacks. Peruse Amazon’s extensive collection to find out which one best fits you.

Buy it: Amazon

7. PacSafe Anti-Theft Backpack; $130

pacsafe anti-theft backpack
Luggage Designers

If you’ve ever decided to crank out an essay or project in a café, you’re probably familiar with the quandary of needing a bathroom break but not wanting to lose your seat or leave your belongings unattended. Instead of asking a potentially untrustworthy stranger if they can watch your stuff, try PacSafe’s anti-theft backpack, which boasts lockable zippers and straps, so you can fasten your backpack right to your table; the fabric and straps contain wire mesh, so nobody will be able to cut them (without some serious tools, that is). The Nylon backpack can fit a 15-inch laptop and includes several inside pockets to help you stay organized; you can also detach the straps and carry it like a small briefcase using the handle on the side.

Buy it: Amazon

8. Syver Wireless Speaker and Earbuds; $100

wicked audio syver bluetooth speaker and earbuds
Wicked Audio

Music-streaming services like Spotify make it possible for you to create an epic soundtrack for your life virtually everywhere you go, whether it’s a simple walk between classes or a backyard barbecue with your roommates and 50 of your closest friends. Check out Wicked Audio’s Syver, a two-in-one device that includes a Bluetooth speaker and wireless earbuds so you can toggle seamlessly between personal listening and party listening. Enhanced bass and noise isolation ensure you’re hearing the music exactly as the artists intended it, and the devices are also waterproof, so they’re safe from spilled drinks, pools, inclement weather, and the toilet.

Buy it: Wicked Audio

9. Fineliner Pens; $9

taotree fineliner pens
Amazon

Taotree’s Fineliner pens are a bullet journaler’s best friend, but you don’t have to be a master of organization to take advantage of these 24 brightly colored, versatile utensils. You could use them to color-code your class notes, pair them with a coloring book for the ultimate de-stressing session, or design your own fine-ink drawings. They dry quickly, won’t bleed through your paper, and have a soft-edged triangular shape for easy gripping. With an average 4.5-star review on Amazon, these pens will add color and character to all of your written projects.

Buy it: Amazon

10. PackIt Freezable Lunch Bag; $20

packit freezable lunch bag
Amazon

With PackIt’s freezable lunch bag, you’ll never again have to jam ice packs around your meal-prepped containers—as long as you remember to pop the bag in the freezer the night before you’re planning to use it. The walls are insulated with a freezing gel that will refrigerate your food until you’re ready for lunch. It zips closed to keep the cold in, collapses for easy storage, and includes a plastic buckle on the top so you can easily clip it to your backpack or bag. It also comes in a lively assortment of designs like cartoon cats, unicorns, mermaids, and cherries (and, of course, many more traditional patterns like polka dots, stripes, and camouflage).

Buy it: Amazon

11. Magnetic Dry-Erase Board; $15-$54

magnetic dry-erase board
Amazon

Whether you need to leave chore-related messages on the fridge for your roommates or homework-related messages for yourself in your locker, Yuc has a magnetic dry-erase board in every size for every situation. The smallest is 12 inches by 8 inches, the largest is 29 inches by 21 inches, and there are even weekly and monthly options so you can see your schedule at eye level. The boards are stain- and wrinkle-resistant, and each comes with a rectangular magnetic eraser, plus five different-colored fine-tipped markers whose caps also double as magnetic erasers.

Buy it: Amazon

12. SnackSack Subscription Box; $25/month

SnackSack Subscription
Amazon

Since getting back into the swing of school is always busy and exhausting, it’s easy to forgo a commitment to healthy eating and instead reach for the nearest bag of Doritos to keep you going. The SnackSack subscription box will help you make sure that doesn’t happen (too often). Each month, you’ll receive a package with 11 to 14 carefully curated, deliciously satisfying healthy snacks like bars, cookies, chips, nuts, seeds, sweets, and popcorn to support you through every all-nighter and last-minute group project—and there are vegan and gluten-free options, too.

Buy it: Amazon

Mental Floss has affiliate relationships with certain retailers and may receive a small percentage of any sale. But we choose all products independently and only get commission on items you buy and don’t return, so we’re only happy if you’re happy. Thanks for helping us pay the bills!

12 Facts About Netflix, Recommended For You

kasinv/iStock Editorial via Getty Images Plus
kasinv/iStock Editorial via Getty Images Plus

Netflix has become the world’s intravenous line for filmed entertainment. And like any media empire, it has a few stories of its own to tell. Take a look at some lesser-known, non-buffering facts about the streaming giant.

1. Early Netflix subscribers got a lot of Chinese pornography.

Addict man at computer laptop watching porn internet addiction concept
OcusFocus/iStock via Getty Images

In 1998, Netflix was still in the business of selling as well as renting DVDs. To try and offer consumers something new, co-founder Marc Randolph decided to offer footage of President Bill Clinton’s Grand Jury testimony about his involvement with Monica Lewinsky. But according to the book Netflixed, the duplicating house had a mix-up: out of the 1000 customers who ordered Clinton's interview, a few hundred received discs full of hardcore Chinese pornography.

2. Netflix was originally called Kibble.

Choosing a name for the company was a drawn-out process. Directpix.com, Replay.com, and other names were considered; so was Luna.com, which was the name of Randolph’s dog. When the company was being incorporated, he named it Kibble.com until they could decide on something permanent.

3. Netflix executives used to make house calls.

From the beginning, Netflix has been preoccupied with seeing how users interact with its software in order to select titles. In the late 1990s, subscribers near the company’s location in Los Gatos, California were reached via telephone and asked a series of questions. Then staffers would ask if they could stop by to watch them use the site. Surprisingly, most agreed. Netflix brought them coffee, a small investment for gaining valuable information about their usage.

4. Netflix got Dennis Quaid to sing.

For a 2006-2007 publicity tour, Netflix decided to screen films in thematically-correct locations: For example, Field of Dreams was shown in the “real” Iowa cornfield-slash-baseball diamond featured in the movie. But the company also wanted actors to make appearances. Their approach: offer to let those with bands perform for the crowds. Kevin Costner, Bruce Willis, Dennis Quaid, and Kevin Bacon all agreed to the barter deal. Quaid and his band, The Sharks, played in New Orleans before a screening of his film The Big Easy.

5. Netflix has made a science out of spoilers.

Because so much of Netflix’s high-profile content can be “binged” in a single weekend, the company commissioned cultural anthropologist Grant McCracken to examine how spoilers affect a person’s viewing habits. McCracken identified classifications of spoiler-prone people by whether they ruin a plot twist intentionally or hold it over others. (Some people are “Coded Spoilers,” too self-aware to let anything slip. These people are your friends.) His verdict? Some people enjoy the power they get from having knowledge of spoilers. But if a show is good enough, knowing about key scenes won't dissuade viewers from watching.

6. Netflix staffers think you decide on a movie in two minutes.

Apple iPad displaying Netflix app, Black with Reflection
bmcent1/iStock Editorial via Getty Images

Netflix spends more than $150 million on improving their recommendation system every year, trying to arrange selections based on what they think you might like. That kind of personalized menu is necessary: The company estimates that users spend only two minutes browsing for a title before choosing one or opting for another diversion entirely.

7. Netflix staffers also think you might be kind of a liar. 

You can stop trying to impress Netflix with the streaming version of keeping Ulysses on your coffee table. In a 2013 WIRED interview, Carlos Gomez-Uribe—the company's vice president of product innovation from 2010 to 2016—noted that viewers often report viewing documentaries or esoteric foreign movies. “But in practice,” he said, “that doesn’t happen very much.”

8. the first "netflix original" was an abstract test footage short.

In order to test frame rates and how their streaming service handles different kinds of content, Netflix produced 11 minutes of test footage in 2011 that can be viewed by typing “example show” in their search engine. Cut together (as seen above), the shorts become a very strange, very abstract art film, with an unidentified man juggling and reciting Shakespeare. (But not, sadly, juggling while reciting Shakespeare.)

9. Netflix binge-watching might correlate with depression. 

A 2015 study by the University of Texas found that respondents who claimed to binge Netflix shows were more likely to suffer from depression, lack of self-control, or loneliness. The good news? The sample group was small—only 316 people—and the university’s definition of “binge-watching” was as low as two episodes. Amateurs. 

10. There’s a secret Netflix menu.

Netflix website showing on screen laptop with macbook pro at cafe
wutwhanfoto/iStock Editorial via Getty Images Plus

No, not that kind of secret menu. Pressing Shift + Alt + a left mouse click brings up a troubleshooting menu that allows you to adjust the bit rate of a stream so it doesn’t buffer. (On a Mac, it's Shift + Option + click.) The picture quality won’t be as good, but it’s better than a pixelated Demogorgon.

11. There was once a glitch in the Netflix matrix. 

In 2014, Netflix’s content descriptions became odd amalgamations of two different titles to create one completely nonsensical listing. The summaries were quickly fixed, but not before someone took several screen shots of the mishaps.

12. You'll soon be able to stream Netflix in a Tesla.


Justin Sullivan, Getty Images

In July 2019, Tesla founder Elon Musk informed Tesla owners they would soon be able to stream both Netflix and YouTube in their cars, an attractive option for anyone looking to keep passengers occupied. But there's a catch: The services only work when the cars are parked. The feature will be available in newer-model cars at a date to be determined.

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