This Website Will Tell You What Book to Read Next

If you, like me, have ever finished a book and thought, "What should I read next?" then the aptly-titled website WhatShouldIReadNext.com is for you. Enter in a title, author, or ISBN number, and the site analyzes reviews and ratings from other readers and recommends books.

This, as it turns out, is a really fun game for any bibliophile. When I entered in one of my all-time favorite books, Mary Roach's Stiff: The Curious LIves of Human Cadavers, the site recommended a few books I'd already read, including The Secret Life of Lobsters, My Lobotomy, and The World Without Us. The books I hadn't read were similarly up my alley; they included The Lost Painting: The Quest for a Caravaggio Masterpiece and The Family That Couldn't Sleep: A Medical Mystery. The one I ended up buying was The Ghost Map: A Street, an Epidemic and the Two Men Who Battled to Save Victorian London. It's all about cholera! This book is totally me.

Now, I'm filling up my book list beyond The Ghost Map. I loved The Devil in the White City; the site suggested The Monster of Florence, The Anatomy of Deception, and The Murder of the Century: The Gilded Age Crime That Scandalized a City & Sparked the Tabloid Wars. Yes, yes, and yes. When I put in The Stranger, the site recommended Antoine De St Exupery: The Life and Death of the Little Prince—a book about the author of one of my all-time favorite books? Sold!—and The Cat Inside. love cats, so this is obviously going on the list. 

I'm officially obsessed with this site. Have you used it and, if so, what did you think of the recommendations? Were there any books that didn't bring up any suggestions? (That's what happened when I entered inThe Inventor and the Tycoon...)

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TASCHEN
Everything You Need to Know About Food in One Book
TASCHEN
TASCHEN

If you find yourself mixing up nigiri and sashimi at sushi restaurants or don’t know which fruits are in season, then this is the book for you. Food & Drink Infographics, published by TASCHEN, is a colorful and comprehensive guide to all things food and drink.

The book combines tips and tricks with historical context about the ways in which different civilizations illustrated and documented the foods they ate, as well as how humans went from hunter-gatherers to modern-day epicureans. As for the infographics, there’s a helpful graphic explaining the number of servings provided by different cake sizes, a heat index of various chilies, a chart of cheeses, and a guide to Italian cold cuts, among other delectable charts.

The 480-page coffee table book, which can be purchased on Amazon for $56, is written in three languages: English, French, and German. The infographics themselves come from various sources, and the text is provided by Simone Klabin, a New York City-based writer and lecturer on film, art, culture, and children’s media.

Keep scrolling to see a few of the infographics featured in the book.

An infographic about cheese
TASCHEN

An infographic about cakes
Courtesy of TASCHEN

An infographic about fruits in season
Courtesy of TASCHEN
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YouTube/Great Big Story
See the Secret Paintings Hidden in Gilded Books
YouTube/Great Big Story
YouTube/Great Big Story

The art of vanishing fore-edge painting—hiding delicate images on the front edges of gilded books—dates back to about 1660. Today, British artist Martin Frost is the last remaining commercial fore-edge painter in the world. He works primarily on antique books, crafting scenes from nature, domestic life, mythology, and Harry Potter. Great Big Story recently caught up with him in his studio to learn more about his disappearing art. Learn more in the video below.

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