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Here's What People Tried to Sneak onto Airplanes in 2014

Nearly 2 million people pass through airport security every day in the United States, and some of them have packed things in their bags that they definitely shouldn't have. It's the job of Transportation Security Administration (TSA) agents to find those things, and if their annual year in review post is any indication, agents were very busy in 2014.

Last year, agents found 2212 guns in checked bags, a 22 percent increase from 2013. Disturbingly, 83 percent of the guns discovered were loaded. The record for most firearms found in carry-on bags was June 4, when 18 guns were found at airports across the country.

But it wasn't just guns that the TSA discovered: They also found things like a homemade avalanche charge, 140 novelty or inert hand grenades, an inert training warhead, and a WWII era blasting machine. And then there were the knives, which TSA agents found hidden in a highlighter and a neck pillow at Philadelphia International Airport; in a laptop's hard drive caddy at Dayton International Airport; and in a potato chip bag at Texas's Amarillo airport. And good thing no one bit into this enchilada that someone tried to take through security at California's Charles M. Schulz–Sonoma County Airport—there was an 8.5-inch knife inside!

Someone even tried to hide razor blades in a Scooby Doo greeting card at the Newport News/Williamsburg International Airport.

And, finally, a note to drug smugglers: Don't try to conceal your drugs inside a package of raw meat in your checked bag (San Jose International Airport) or in a hollowed out textbook (Philadelphia International Airport). The TSA will find them.

For more on what the TSA found in luggage in 2014, read the whole blog post—complete with crazy photos—here.

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26 Facts About LEGO Bricks

Since it first added plastic, interlocking bricks to its lineup, the Danish toy company LEGO (from the words Leg Godt for “play well”) has inspired builders of all ages to bring their most imaginative designs to life. Sets have ranged in size from scenes that can be assembled in a few minutes to 5000-piece behemoths depicting famous landmarks. And tinkerers aren’t limited to the sets they find in stores. One of the largest LEGO creations was a life-sized home in the UK that required 3.2 million tiny bricks to construct.

In this episode of the List Show, John Green lays out 26 playful facts about one of the world’s most beloved toy brands. To hear about the LEGO black market, the vault containing every LEGO set ever released, and more, check out the video above then subscribe to our YouTube channel to stay up-to-date with the latest flossy content.

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Of Buckeyes and Butternuts: 29 States With Weird Nicknames for Their Residents
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Tracing a word’s origin and evolution can yield fascinating historical insights—and the weird nicknames used in some states to describe their residents are no exception. In the Mental Floss video above, host John Green explains the probable etymologies of 29 monikers that describe inhabitants of certain states across the country.

Some of these nicknames, like “Hoosiers” and “Arkies” (which denote residents of Indiana and Arkansas, respectively) may have slightly offensive connotations, while others—including "Buckeyes," "Jayhawks," "Butternuts," and "Tar Heels"—evoke the military histories of Ohio, Kansas, Tennessee, and North Carolina. And a few, like “Muskrats” and “Sourdoughs,” are even inspired by early foods eaten in Delaware and Alaska. ("Goober-grabber" sounds goofier, but it at least refers to peanuts, which are a common crop in Georgia, as well as North Carolina and Arkansas.)

Learn more fascinating facts about states' nicknames for their residents by watching the video above.

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