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15 Gorgeous Little Free Libraries

Photo courtesy of Flickr user David Silver.

The Little Free Library movement began in Wisconsin in 2009, and gained momentum quickly. Little free libraries sprung up all over the world—outside cafes, in parks, beside full-sized libraries and bookstores, and even in people’s front yards. They have books inside for anyone to borrow, with signs inviting users to donate books. By January 2015, the number of mini libraries registered with the Little Free Library organization had grown to 22,000. 

We’ve gathered some of the best photos of Little Free Libraries we could find, everything from the classic house-like structures for sale on the organization’s website to a series of little libraries in New York City sponsored by the PEN World Voices Festival and The Architectural League of New York.

1. I’ll be your mirror

Fourth Arts Block, Extra Place with stpmj, photo courtesy of stpmj.

This little library at Fourth Arts Block is clad in mirrors that reflect the street art on a nearby brick wall. 

2. Repurposed newspaper box

Photo credit Flickr user Josh Larios.

The slow decline of traditional news media does not, fortunately, mean the end of reading. 

3. Inspired by Andrew Carnegie

Photo courtesy of Alexandra Hay, The Architectural League of New York. 

The Little Free Library project has drawn much of its inspiration from Andrew Carnegie, the great funder of American libraries. This library was placed outside New York City’s University Settlement by Mark Rakatansky Studio with Aaron White. 

4. British phone booth style

Photo by Christine Modey.

American phone booths were never this pretty. 

5. Nook and cranny

Photo courtesy of Alexandra Hay, The Architectural League of New York.

This inventive library is set between two pillars outside Cooper Union in New York City. It was designed by the Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture’s Design III Studio with Maja Hjertsén Knutson and Christopher Taleff, designer leaders and Michael Young, David Allin and Lydia Kallipoliti, faculty team. 

6. The A-Frame

Photo courtesy of Flickr user Mark Turnauckas.

This little library in Ohio is adorably triangular. 

7. Particleboard that looks like paper

Photo courtesy of Alexandra Hay, The Architectural League of New York.

This Little Free Library doubles as a bench. It’s located at the Two Bridges Neighborhood Council in New York City, and was designed with Chat Travieso. 

8. Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

Photo courtesy of Flickr user Mark McClure

The Little Free Library organization encourages people to build libraries out of reclaimed materials, like this repurposed window. 

9. Sunshine on a cloudy day

Photo courtesy of Beowulf Sheehan/PEN American Center. 

This cheerful Little Free library at St. Patrick’s Old Cathedral School was designed by The They Co. with Stereotank. 

10. The Doctor is In

Photo by @EugeneTardisLFL

Many LFLs have been designed to look like the Tardis from Dr. Who

11. The Wall-E of Little Free Libraries

Photo by Carolyn Kellogg.

This LFL in Joshua Tree looks like a pair of robot eyes. 

12. The book in the bubble

New York University with Matter Practice, photo courtesy of Beowulf Sheehan/PEN American Center. 

Some Little Free Libraries are small enough that they only hold one book, like this one at New York University that’s attracting the attention of a passing child. 

13. The bird house

Photo courtesy of Mallorn Imagery

This library in Moscow looks like it could hold bird seed as well as books. 

14. The transparent library

Photo courtesy of Beowulf Sheehan/PEN American Center.

This installation at La MaMa in New York City, designed with Davies Tang + Toews, has a clear compartment for each book. 

15. Park it here

Created by the Hester Street Collaborative with Shannon Harvey, Adam Michaels and Levi Murphy, photo courtesy of Shannon Harvey.

This library on Hester Street in New York transforms an ordinary cement lot into a refuge. 

Is there a Little Free Library in your neighborhood? Show us a picture in the comments! If you don’t have one near you yet, check out the Little Free Library website for information on how to buy or build your own little library. 

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Stones, Bones, and Wrecks
Buckingham Palace Was Built With Jurassic Fossils, Scientists Find
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iStock

The UK's Buckingham Palace is a vestige from another era, and not just because it was built in the early 18th century. According to a new study, the limestone used to construct it is filled with the fossilized remains of microbes from the Jurassic period of 200 million years ago, as The Telegraph reports.

The palace is made of oolitic limestone, which consists of individual balls of carbonate sediment called ooids. The material is strong but lightweight, and is found worldwide. Jurassic oolite has been used to construct numerous famous buildings, from those in the British city of Bath to the Empire State Building and the Pentagon.

A new study from Australian National University published in Scientific Reports found that the spherical ooids in Buckingham Palace's walls are made up of layers and layers of mineralized microbes. Inspired by a mathematical model from the 1970s for predicting the growth of brain tumors, the researchers created a model that explains how ooids are created and predicts the factors that limit their ultimate size.

A hand holding a chunk of oolite limestone
Australian National University

They found that the mineralization of the microbes forms the central core of the ooid, and the layers of sediment that gather around that core feed those microbes until the nutrients can no longer reach the core from the outermost layer.

This contrasts with previous research on how ooids form, which hypothesized that they are the result of sediment gathered from rolling on the ocean floor. It also reshapes how we think about the buildings made out of oolitic limestone from this period. Next time you look up at the Empire State Building or Buckingham Palace, thank the ancient microbes.

[h/t The Telegraph]

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architecture
5 Scrapped Designs for the World's Most Famous Buildings
Ker Robertson, Getty Images
Ker Robertson, Getty Images

When an architect gets commissioned to build a skyscraper or a memorial, they’re usually not the only applicant for the job. Other teams of designers submit their own ideas for how it should look, too, but these are eventually passed over in favor of the final design. This is the case for some of the world’s most recognizable landmarks—in an alternate world, the Arc de Triomphe might have been a three-story-tall elephant statue, and the Lincoln Memorial a step pyramid.

GoCompare, a comparison site for financial services, dug into these could-have-been designs for Alternate Architecture, an illustrated collection of scrapped designs for some of the most famous structures in the world, from Chicago's Tribune Tower to the Sydney Opera House.

Click through the interactive graphic below to explore rejected designs for all five landmarks.

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