11 Surprising Locations That Played a Key Role in the Revolution

From the Boston Massacre to the Boston Tea Party, the Massachusetts capital’s effect on the American Revolutionary War is widely documented. But, while Boston was a hotspot of revolutionary activity, it far from single-handedly won the war. Here are 11 locations that are often overlooked by the history books, but nevertheless significantly impacted the war effort.

1. Weare, New Hampshire

One of the first open acts of rebellion against the British crown happened in the small town of Weare, New Hampshire, on April 14, 1772, when a group of colonists took a stand against Britain’s oppressive pine tree laws. Beginning in the 17th century, England reserved all New Hampshire’s white pine trees larger than one foot in diameter for the Crown—a repressive rule since the thick, tall trees were used for ships’ masts. Luckily for colonists, these laws were rarely enforced until John Wentworth was appointed governor of New Hampshire in 1766.

In 1772, Wentworth and his deputy charged six mill owners in Goffstown and Weare with breaking the law (by cutting down the trees for their own purposes). The Goffstown mill owners readily paid their fines, but the Weare mill owner refused. On April 13, Sheriff Benjamin Whiting issued a warrant for the arrest of the leader of the Weare mill owner, Ebenezer Mudgett. At dawn the next morning, Mudgett and a group of townspeople burst into Whiting’s room at the Pine Tree Tavern and drove him from the town.

2. Rhode Island

On May 4, 1776—a full two months before the signing of the Declaration of Independence—Rhode Island became the first colony to sever ties with England and renounce allegiance to King George. Rhode Island, home to the significant ports of Providence and Newport, suffered under the new trade restrictions and tariffs set forth by the Sugar Act and decided to take an early stand.

3. Louisiana

Louisiana wasn’t one of the 13 original colonies or even part of the British empire, but thanks to its Spanish governor, Bernardo de Galvez, the territory made a major impact on the American Revolution. Galvez sent supplies to the colonial armies and, upon Spain’s entry into the war in 1779, captured the British-held forts at Baton Rouge in Natchez. In 1781, Galvez would secure Mobile, Alabama, for the American cause and lead a heroic attack on the British in Pensacola, Florida that drove the British out of Western Florida. Thanks to Galvez, Louisiana provided some much-needed relief to General George Washington’s troops just as the British were turning their attention towards the Southern colonies.

4. Virginia

Virginia’s involvement in the Revolutionary War isn’t exactly surprising—the colony was the site of many major battles throughout the war, including the Battle of Yorktown, where the British ultimately surrendered. However, Virginia’s early support of Boston and the Northern colonies is often lost in the shuffle. In 1774, while the Intolerable Acts (called the Coercive Acts by the British) kept Boston Harbor closed, Virginia sent supplies and men to the besieged city and pledged to back Massachusetts in its revolutionary effort.

5. New York Harbor

On September 7, 1776, New York Harbor became the site of the world’s first use of a submarine in warfare, as the American submersible Turtle attempted to attach a time bomb to the British flagship Eagle. Unfortunately, due to the submarine pilot’s lack of skill in operating the vessel, which was entirely hand-powered, the bomb failed to attach to the Eagle and exploded nearby as the Turtle made its retreat. No harm came to either ship. However, George Washington would later give the bomb’s inventor, David Bushnell, a commission as an Army engineer, which led to Bushnell perfecting drifting mines that sank a number of British ships.

6. Charleston, South Carolina

Thirteen days before Boston’s famous Tea Party, the people of Charleston had one of their own. On December 3, 1773, a ship carrying East Indian tea docked in Charleston Harbor. The Charlestonians refused the purchase the tea, and insisted it be returned to England. When the ship’s captain refused, the colonists seized the tea and locked it in the Old Exchange Building. Over time, the South Carolinians would seize hundreds of tea chests from the British; these were sold in 1776, with the proceeds going to the Revolutionary cause.

7. Barbados

One of the most devastating naval losses for the Continental forces happened off the east coast of Barbados on March 7, 1778. The frigate USS Randolph, helmed by Captain Nicholas Biddle, was escorting a fleet of American ships to the West Indies when it was attacked by the HMS Yarmouth. A superior ship, the Yarmouth made quick work of sinking the Randolph and killing 301 men on board (all but four of the Randolph’s crew). While the Battle off Barbados would become one of the deadliest battles of the Revolutionary War (and America’s most costly naval defeat until the sinking of the USS Arizona in 1941), Captain Biddle would go down in history as a war hero.

8. Connecticut

While no Revolutionary War battles took place on Connecticut soil, the tiny colony was instrumental in outfitting the Continental troops. George Washington dubbed Connecticut the Provisions State for its generosity to the war effort—while Connecticut was the third-smallest colony, it provided more food and cannons for Washington’s army than any other.

9. Bennington, Vermont

While Vermont declared itself an independent state in 1777, it was not officially one of the 13 original colonies (its land was disputed by New York and New Hampshire, and Vermont would go on to become the 14th state)—but that didn’t prevent it from leaving its mark on the American Revolution. During the summer of 1777, British troops made their way down the Lake Champlain-Hudson River corridor toward Albany, planning to isolate New England from the rest of the colonies. But by August, they were in great need of supplies, so the British General John Burgoyne sent his men into the small town of Burlington, Vermont, to capture provisions from the colonists.

But the Patriots would not give up their goods without a fight—and indeed, won the Battle of Bennington on August 16. While itself a minor victory, the Battle of Bennington weakened General Burgoyne’s troops, thus allowing for an American victory at the Battle of Saratoga (a major turning point in the war, as it convinced France to lend its support to the colonies) just a few months later.

10. Baltimore, Maryland

For its second session (from December 1776 to February 1777), the Second Continental Congress moved from Philadelphia to Baltimore, as the advancing British troops made Philadelphia too dangerous for a Congressional meeting. This means that, during this brief period, Baltimore was considered America’s capital.

11. Annapolis, Maryland

Not to be outdone by its fellow Maryland city, Annapolis became the United States’ first peacetime capital in 1783. The Treaty of Paris, which formally ended the war, was ratified by the Continental Congress—temporarily located in Annapolis—on January 14, 1784.

10 Timeless Facts About The Land Before Time

Universal Pictures Home Entertainment
Universal Pictures Home Entertainment

Five years before Jurassic Park roared into theaters, a gentler, more meditative dinosaur film endeared itself to audiences of all ages. Initially met with mixed reviews, The Land Before Time is now regarded as an animated classic. Here are 10 things you might not have known about the Steven Spielberg-produced film, which arrived in theaters 30 years ago.

1. IT WAS CONCEIVED AS A DIALOGUE-FREE MOVIE.

Gabriel Damon and Candace Hutson in The Land Before Time (1988)
Universal Pictures Home Entertainment

In the mid-1980s, executive producer Steven Spielberg began toying with the idea of a Bambi-esque dinosaur film. “Basically,” he later said, “I wanted to do a soft picture … about five little dinosaurs and how they grow up and work together as a group.” Inspiration came from the “Rite of Spring” sequence from Disney’s Fantasia (1940)—a scene in which prehistoric beasts wordlessly go about their business. At first, Spielberg wanted his own dinosaur characters to follow suit and remain mum. Ultimately, however, it was feared that a non-verbal approach might bore or confuse the film’s intended audience. As such, the animals were given lines.

2. DIRECTOR DON BLUTH WAS AN EX-DISNEY EMPLOYEE.

Don Bluth grew up idolizing Disney’s work, and began working for the studio in 1955. Over the next two decades, he did various odd jobs until he was brought on as a full-time animator in 1971. Once on the inside, Bluth got to peek behind the magician’s curtain—and disliked what he found there. “I think [Walt Disney] would’ve seen that the pictures were losing their luster,” Bluth said. Frustrated by the studio’s cost-cutting measures, he resigned in 1979. Joining him were fellow animators Gary Goldman and John Pomeroy. Together the trio launched their own company, Sullivan Bluth Studios, and began working on The Land Before Time in 1986.

3. OVER 600 BACKGROUND PAINTINGS WERE MADE FOR THE FILM.

Most of these depicted beautiful but barren wastelands, which presented a real challenge for the creative team. As one studio press release put it, “The artists had to create a believable environment in which there was almost no foliage.” Whenever possible, Bluth’s illustrators emphasized vibrant colors. This kept their backdrops from looking too drab or monotonous—despite the desolate setting.

4. LITTLEFOOT’S ORIGINAL NAME WAS “THUNDERFOOT.”

This was changed when the filmmakers learned that there was a triceratops in a popular children’s book called Thunderfoot. Speaking of three-horned dinosaurs: Cera evolved from a pugnacious male character called Bambo.

5. THE FILMMAKERS HAD TO CUT ABOUT 10 MINUTES OF FOOTAGE.

“We compromised a lot with The Land Before Time,” Goldman admitted. Nowhere was this fact more apparent than on the cutting room floor. Spielberg and his fellow executive producer George Lucas deemed 19 individual scenes “too scary.” “We’ll have kids crying in the lobby, and angry parents,” Spielberg warned. “You don’t want that.”

6. “ROOTER” WAS INTRODUCED AT THE URGING OF CHILD PSYCHOLOGISTS.

In Bambi, the title character’s mom dies off-screen. The same cannot be said for Littlefoot’s mother, whose slow demise goes on for several agonizing minutes. Naturally, there was some concern about how children would react to this. “A lot of research went into the mother dying sequence,” Pomeroy said. “Psychologists were approached and shown the film. They gave their professional opinions of how the sequence could be depicted.” Thus, Rooter was born.

One scene after Littlefoot’s mom passes, the wise reptile consoles him, saying “You’ll always miss her, but she’ll always be with you as long as you remember the things she taught you.” Sharp-eared fans might recognize Rooter’s voice as that of Pat Hingle, who also narrates the movie.

7. JAMES HORNER DID THE SOUNDTRACK.

The late, Oscar-winning composer behind Braveheart (1995), Titanic (1997), and Avatar (2009) put together a soaring score. Along with lyricist Will Jennings, he also penned the original song “If We Hold On Together,” which Diana Ross sings as the end credits roll.

8. THE ACTRESS BEHIND DUCKY PASSED AWAY BEFORE THE MOVIE’S RELEASE.

Judith Barsi’s career was off to a great start. By age 10, this daughter of Hungarian immigrants had already appeared in 70 commercials and voiced the leading lady in Don Bluth’s All Dogs Go to Heaven (1989). For The Land Before Time, Barsi voiced the ever-optimistic Ducky, which was reportedly her favorite role. Then tragedy struck: In July of 1988, Barsi’s father József murdered both her and her mother before taking his own life.

9. IT HAD A RECORD-SETTING OPENING WEEKEND.

From the get-go, The Land Before Time had some stiff competition. Universal released it on November 18, 1988—the same day that Disney’s Oliver & Company hit theaters. Yet, for a solid month, Bluth gave Oliver a box office beating. The Land Before Time enjoyed the highest-grossing opening weekend that any animated film had ever seen, pulling in $7.5 million to Oliver & Company’s $4 million. Since then, of course, The Land Before Time has long been dethroned; today, Incredibles 2 (2018) holds this coveted distinction with a $182.7 million first-weekend showing.

10. THERE ONCE WAS TALK OF A LAND BEFORE TIME STAGE MUSICAL.

“The time has come for dinosaurs on Broadway,” the late theatrical producer Irving Welzer told The New York Times in 1997. Emboldened by the recent cinematic success of Spielberg’s The Lost World: Jurassic Park (1996), Welzer expressed an interest helping Littlefoot, Cera, Ducky, and the rest of the gang make their Big Apple debut. Soon, however, the idea faded.

40 Dandy D-Words To Deepen Your Vocabulary

iStock/gazanfer gungor
iStock/gazanfer gungor

It’s thought that the earliest ancestor of our humble letter D was an Ancient Egyptian hieroglyph representing a door, which is where D get its hollowed-out shape from. Over time, that hieroglyph became a Phoenician letter, dalet, which then became the Greek letter delta, and finally the Roman letter D, which arrived in England (along with most of the rest of the modern alphabet) from continental Europe more than 1500 years ago.

Before then, English was written using a runic writing system called futhorc, a number of the letters of which—like thorn (Þ þ) and wynn (Ƿ ƿ)—survived into the Old English period before dying out later. The Old English letter eth(Ð ð), however, effectively went the other way: it was invented in Britain (or perhaps Ireland) after the introduction of the Latin alphabet to England, and is actually a derivative of the Roman letter D. Although it too eventually fell out of use, it still survives in modern-day Icelandic.

Nowadays, D is one of the most frequently used letters of our alphabet, accounting for just over 4 percent of a standard page of English text (or one out of every 25 letters), and roughly 2.5 percent of all the words in a standard dictionary—including the 40 delicious D words listed here…

1. DAB-DUMP

An old Yorkshire dialect word for a pool of water left on the beach after the tide retreats.

2. DABERLICK

Daberlick or dabberlack is an old dialect name for long, straggly seaweed. Figuratively, it can be used as a nickname for greasy, lank hair, or for a tall, gangly person.

3. DABSTER

An astute or especially skilled worker.

4. DAFFLED

If you’re daffled, then you’re bewildered or disorientated by a sensory overload.

5. DANDIE-CLAW

A dandie-claw is an easily completed task or, when used in the phrase, “to give it the dandie-claw,” it essentially means “that won’t last long,” or “that won’t take long to finish off.” No one is quite sure where the phrase comes from, but it’s possible that a dandy or dandie-claw was originally a small brush used to groom horses, which at some point in time might have become synonymous with a brief or undemanding chore.

6. DANDLE

To bounce a baby on your knee is to dandle it.

7. DANG-SWANG

To do something dang-swang is to do it vigorously, or with great energy or enthusiasm.

8. DANGLEMENT

An 18th century word either for a finger, or for a dangling decoration, or trim on a garment. A danglet—literally a “little dangle”—is an icicle.

9. DAPPERPYE

An old adjective meaning “variegated” or “multi-colored.”

10. DAPPERWIT

A quick-witted, lively young man.

11. DARING-HARDY

A Shakespearean invention meaning “recklessly bold,” or “foolhardy.”

12. DAWK

A thick fog or mist.

13. DAYLIGAUN

An old Scots word for twilight, dayligaun literally means “daylight-going.”

14. DEAD-HORSE

As a metaphor for something that has ceased to be useful, the term dead horse is today more often than not used in the phrase “flogging a dead horse,” meaning “to fruitlessly continue with something all interest has been lost in.” Before then, however, dead-horse was a 17th-century term for work for which you’d been paid in full in advance—and so to work the dead-horse or for a dead horse meant “to busy yourself in work that at the end of which you won’t be paid.” A dead-man, incidentally, is an old English nickname for an empty liquor bottle, so being down among the dead-men meant “passed out drunk on the floor” in 18th-century English.

15. DEAD-NIP

18th-century slang for a failed idea.

16. DEAMBULATE

To walk about, or to stray away from home.

17. DECIDOPHOBIA

If you’re decidophobic, then you hate making decisions. Other D phobias include dendrophobia (trees), dromophobia (running, or crossing roads), didaskaleinophobia (school), dipsophobia (alcohol), and doraphobia (animal furs).

18. DEDOLEATE

A 17th-century word meaning “to cease to be unhappy.”

19. DEJERATE

To swear a solemn oath. Someone who does precisely that is a dejerator.

20. DEONERATE

To unpack cargo or to remove someone’s burden is to deonerate them. To depauperate them is to impoverish them, while to depulse them would be to drive them off.

21. DEPECULATE

Peculation is an old 17th-century legal term for embezzlement—in particular, the embezzlement of funds belonging to a country or head of state. To peculate or depeculate, ultimately, is an old-fashioned word meaning “to steal by peculation,” which was typically used to refer to public officials pilfering state funds for their own personal use.

22. DEPEDITATE

In medical terminology, a depeditation is the amputation of a foot. Thankfully, the relative verb depeditate can simply be used to mean “to be deprived of the use of your feet”—worth remembering next time you go deambulating in a new pair of shoes.

23. DEPROELIATION

Derived from a Latin word meaning “to engage violently in war,” deproeliation is just a 17th-century word for a battle.

24. DIABLERIE

The perfect word for Dr. Faustus: diablerie is work or business done with, or for, the Devil. Figuratively, it can mean recklessness or audaciousness, or else any underhand, shady dealing.

25. DIABLOTIN

Borrowed into English from French in the 1800s, a diablotin is a tiny devil or imp. It’s also, because of its unusual appearance, a nickname for the oilbird.

26. DIAL-PLATE

An 18th century nickname for a person’s face (derived from the dial or “face” of a clock).

27. DILLYALL

An old English dialect word for anything owned because it looks nice, not because it’s useful or functional.

28. DILORICATE

To diloricate something is to rip or tear it. It derives from a Latin word, lorica, for a Roman soldier’s leather cuirass or breastplate—and so might originally have referred to injuries suffered in battle that were bad enough to puncture armor.

29. DIMBER

Dimber was a 17th-century word meaning “pretty” or “smart,” while a dimber-damber was the leader or “face” of a gang of rogues or vagabonds.

30. DISCALCEATE

To discalceate is to remove your shoes. Worth remembering once you’ve deambulated and depeditated.

31. DO-NO-BETTER

The slightly less complimentary Edwardian equivalent of bae—a do-no-better or do-nae-better was “a sweetheart whom one has to be content with, for want of a better.”

32. DOATY

When your head nods up and down while you’re trying to stay awake? That’s doatying.

33. DOCH-AN-DORRIS

A doch-an-dorris or deochandorus is a “stirrup-cup”—a drink or toast made with, or in honor of, someone about to leave. It derives from an old 17th-century Scots Gaelic phrase, deoch an doruis, that literally means “door-drink.”

34. DOCK-WALLOPER

Originally a nickname for someone who hangs around dockyards looking for work, dock-walloper is an old 19th-century American slang word for a loafer or idler.

35. DOLLYMAWKIN

A frivolous, scatterbrained young woman.

36. DOODLE-SHOP

An old dialect nickname for a sweetshop.

37. DRAGGLETAIL

In 18th-century English, an untidily or slatternly dressed woman. Literally, a woman who has let the tails of her dress drag through the rain or mud.

38. DULCILOQUY

A soft or sweet manner of speaking. Likewise, if you’re dulciloquent, then you have a pleasant voice.

39. DUTCH CONCERT

The incomprehensibleness of Dutch to speakers of English is the origin of double Dutch, meaning “gibberish” or “nonsense,” and Dutch concert, an old nickname for an incongruous or cacophonous mishmash of noises or sounds.

40. DWINE

To dwindle or pine away.

This article originally ran in 2016.

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