CLOSE

This Video Will Bring Out Your Inner Typophile

To celebrate the launch of Web FontFonts with OpenType features, Stark Films and FontFont teamed up to bring you this charming video.

Fonts and typefaces are brought alive with ants, machinery, and mice. The phrase "the quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog" is commonly used to showcase fonts because it incorporates all the letters of the alphabet; you can see the words displayed in some creatively unconventional ways.  Directed by Rob Blake and Zu Kalinowska, this lovely clip is likely to delight you regardless of your knowledge of typography. 

So what's this new launch about? The idea is to make optimizing your font easier than ever. The new features allow you to "spice up your web identity through the magic of ligatures, stylistic alternates, figure sets, fractions, small caps and even swashes (if available in the font). " If that's not exciting, seeing mice running through a maze of letters might do the trick.

arrow
video
26 Facts About LEGO Bricks

Since it first added plastic, interlocking bricks to its lineup, the Danish toy company LEGO (from the words Leg Godt for “play well”) has inspired builders of all ages to bring their most imaginative designs to life. Sets have ranged in size from scenes that can be assembled in a few minutes to 5000-piece behemoths depicting famous landmarks. And tinkerers aren’t limited to the sets they find in stores. One of the largest LEGO creations was a life-sized home in the UK that required 3.2 million tiny bricks to construct.

In this episode of the List Show, John Green lays out 26 playful facts about one of the world’s most beloved toy brands. To hear about the LEGO black market, the vault containing every LEGO set ever released, and more, check out the video above then subscribe to our YouTube channel to stay up-to-date with the latest flossy content.

Original image
iStock
arrow
video
Of Buckeyes and Butternuts: 29 States With Weird Nicknames for Their Residents
Original image
iStock

Tracing a word’s origin and evolution can yield fascinating historical insights—and the weird nicknames used in some states to describe their residents are no exception. In the Mental Floss video above, host John Green explains the probable etymologies of 29 monikers that describe inhabitants of certain states across the country.

Some of these nicknames, like “Hoosiers” and “Arkies” (which denote residents of Indiana and Arkansas, respectively) may have slightly offensive connotations, while others—including "Buckeyes," "Jayhawks," "Butternuts," and "Tar Heels"—evoke the military histories of Ohio, Kansas, Tennessee, and North Carolina. And a few, like “Muskrats” and “Sourdoughs,” are even inspired by early foods eaten in Delaware and Alaska. ("Goober-grabber" sounds goofier, but it at least refers to peanuts, which are a common crop in Georgia, as well as North Carolina and Arkansas.)

Learn more fascinating facts about states' nicknames for their residents by watching the video above.

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios