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If The United States Retires The Penny, Where Will All The Old Ones Go?

The debate over the penny's worth (as in its right to exist, not monetary worth, which, of course, is 1/100th of a dollar) is a recurring theme in modern American politics. The first piece of legislation introduced to Congress regarding the matter was the Price Rounding Act of 1989, which was brought forth "to provide a method for removing one-cent pieces from cash transactions." It failed, and Abe Lincoln's shiny head was spared, but the issue is still raised time and time again.

By every measure, minting pennies is a waste of money and resources for the U.S. government. In 2011, the U.S. lost $60.2 million making and circulating the coin and, in 2013, the U.S. Mint estimated that it cost 1.8 cents to produce each penny (not including distribution costs). There are arguments for keeping the coin, but evidence suggests that the penny's existence is pointless.

Were the government to tell the one cent coin to get lost, where would all the pennies go? For answers, it's always best to look to our sane cousins to the north, Canada. Because the two countries' coinage distribution is so similar, the results of a phase-out would likely look the same.

In 2012, Canada's Economic Action Plan started the process of stopping penny production. According to a New York Times article about the phase-out, Canadians were "encouraged to bring [pennies] to banks for eventual melting or to donate them to charities—which will presumably bring them in for melting." Retailers were told to start rounding up or down to the nearest five cent mark starting on February 4, 2013. Still, the government allowed pennies to "be used in cash transactions indefinitely with businesses that choose to accept them."

The U.S. mints a lot of pennies per year—the estimate for 2014's haul is 6,848,400,000—and, were production to cease today, the government would have minted some 300 billion since 1787. Of that, only 140 to 200 billion pennies are actually in circulation today. That's because the coin doesn't have a high usage rate—substantial numbers get thrown into fountains, lost in couch cushions, dropped down subway grates, etc. Should the government enact a phase-out, this will continue to happen to the nation's limited supply of existing pennies (that haven't been voluntarily melted down) until the numbers dwindle enough for collectors to really take notice. How long will this be? Considering you can buy a 5 lb. pile of Canadian pennies for a little over five bucks U.S., chances are it'll take longer than a year.

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Big Questions
Why Do Fruitcakes Last So Long?
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Fruitcake is a shelf-stable food unlike any other. One Ohio family has kept the same fruitcake uneaten (except for periodic taste tests) since it was baked in 1878. In Antarctica, a century-old fruitcake discovered in artifacts left by explorer Robert Falcon Scott’s 1910 expedition remains “almost edible,” according to the researchers who found it. So what is it that makes fruitcake so freakishly hardy?

It comes down to the ingredients. Fruitcake is notoriously dense. Unlike almost any other cake, it’s packed chock-full of already-preserved foods, like dried and candied nuts and fruit. All those dry ingredients don’t give microorganisms enough moisture to reproduce, as Ben Chapman, a food safety specialist at North Carolina State University, explained in 2014. That keeps bacteria from developing on the cake.

Oh, and the booze helps. A good fruitcake involves plenty of alcohol to help it stay shelf-stable for years on end. Immediately after a fruitcake cools, most bakers will wrap it in a cheesecloth soaked in liquor and store it in an airtight container. This keeps mold and yeast from developing on the surface. It also keeps the cake deliciously moist.

In fact, fruitcakes aren’t just capable of surviving unspoiled for months on end; some people contend they’re better that way. Fruitcake fans swear by the aging process, letting their cakes sit for months or even years at a stretch. Like what happens to a wine with age, this allows the tannins in the fruit to mellow, according to the Wisconsin bakery Swiss Colony, which has been selling fruitcakes since the 1960s. As it ages, it becomes even more flavorful, bringing out complex notes that a young fruitcake (or wine) lacks.

If you want your fruitcake to age gracefully, you’ll have to give it a little more hooch every once in a while. If you’re keeping it on the counter in advance of a holiday feast a few weeks away, the King Arthur Flour Company recommends unwrapping it and brushing it with whatever alcohol you’ve chosen (brandy and rum are popular choices) every few days. This is called “feeding” the cake, and should happen every week or so.

The aging process is built into our traditions around fruitcakes. In Great Britain, one wedding tradition calls for the bride and groom to save the top tier of a three-tier fruitcake to eat until the christening of the couple’s first child—presumably at least a year later, if not more.

Though true fruitcake aficionados argue over exactly how long you should be marinating your fruitcake in the fridge, The Spruce says that “it's generally recommended that soaked fruitcake should be consumed within two years.” Which isn't to say that the cake couldn’t last longer, as our century-old Antarctic fruitcake proves. Honestly, it would probably taste OK if you let it sit in brandy for a few days.

Have you got a Big Question you'd like us to answer? If so, let us know by emailing us at bigquestions@mentalfloss.com.

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What's the Difference Between Stuffing and Dressing?
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For carbohydrate consumers, nothing completes a Thanksgiving meal like stuffing—shovelfuls of bread, celery, mushrooms, and other ingredients that complement all of that turkey protein.

Some people don’t say “stuffing,” though. They say “dressing.” In these calamitous times, knowing how to properly refer to the giant glob of insulin-spiking bread seems necessary. So what's the difference?

Let’s dismiss one theory off the bat: Dressing and stuffing do not correlate with how the side dish is prepared. A turkey can be stuffed with dressing, and stuffing can be served in a casserole dish. Whether it’s ever seen the inside of a bird is irrelevant, and anyone who tells you otherwise is wrong and should be met with suspicion, if not outright derision.

The terms are actually separated due to regional dialects. “Dressing” seems to be the favored descriptor for southern states like Mississippi, Tennessee, South Carolina, and Georgia, while “stuffing” is preferred by Maine, New York, and other northern areas. (Some parts of Pennsylvania call it "filling," which is a bit too on the nose, but to each their own.)

If “stuffing” stemmed from the common practice of filling a turkey with carbs, why the division? According to The Huffington Post, it may have been because Southerners considered the word “stuffing” impolite, so never embraced it.

While you should experience no material difference in asking for stuffing or dressing, when visiting relatives it might be helpful to keep to their regionally-preferred word to avoid confusion. Enjoy stuffing yourselves.

Have you got a Big Question you'd like us to answer? If so, let us know by emailing us at bigquestions@mentalfloss.com.

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