21 Things You Might Not Have Known About The Office

Kerbyh529's channel, Youtube
Kerbyh529's channel, Youtube

In 2005, a group of Americans were tasked with adapting beloved British series The Office. They rose to the high expectations and managed to create a successful comedy that ran for nine seasons. Here are 21 things you might not have known about the show.

1. B.J. Novak was the first person cast. The show’s producer, Greg Daniels, was inspired by his time on Saturday Night Live and wanted to hire a writer-performer. Other writer-performers who were later added include Mindy Kaling (Kelly) and Paul Lieberstein (Toby). Michael Schur, who wrote and produced the show, played Dwight’s cousin, Mose.

2. The cast could have been a lot different. For instance, Adam Scott auditioned for the part of Jim Halpert. Seth Rogen was in the running to play Dwight Schrute. Eric Stonestreet, who is now on Modern Family, auditioned for Kevin. Before getting cast as Angela, Angela Kinsey auditioned for Pam. Bob Odenkirk was originally cast as Michael Scott but was replaced by Steve Carell when the show he’d been working on, Come to Papa, was cancelled.

See Also: 12 Outrageous Fan Theories About The Office

3. One reason Adam Scott could have easily played Jim: John Krasinski’s Office audition didn’t go too well. First of all, he was supposed to audition for Dwight, but he convinced the casting directors to let him read for the part of Jim. Secondly, he got into some trouble in the waiting room. A man eating salad in the room asked him if he was nervous. Krasinski answered, “You know, not really. You either get these things or you don't. But what I'm really nervous about is this show. It's just I love the British show so much and Americans have a tendency to just really screw these opportunities up. I just don't know how I'll live with myself if they screw this show up and ruin it for me.” The man responded, “My name's Greg Daniels, I'm the Executive Producer.” Still, Krasinski managed to get the part.

4. Phyllis Smith was a casting agent for the show before she got the part of Phyllis. She was reading the script with some auditioning actors when director Ken Kwapis decided that she was the one who should be cast.

5. Even if they weren’t writers, Daniels wanted to make sure his actors had a background in improvisation. He has said, “Improv is a good tool to make it seem more natural."

6. The pilot was shot with essentially the same script as the pilot from the British show. Many viewers questioned this decision, but it had to be done considering NBC bought an adaptation. Daniels believes that the show really branched out into its own entity in the second season.

7. It was hard for the cast and crew to have faith early on. During the first season, NBC executives would show up on set, bringing a lot of pessimism. According to John Krasinski, they would say things like, “This episode is so good—unfortunately, it’s the last one we’re going to do.”

8. One thing that helped save the show was iTunes. Around the second season, when NBC made the show available on the platform, it took up four of the top five slots for downloaded television shows. That’s when the people behind the show learned that their audience skewed young, rather than the white-collar workers they thought would be watching.

9. The Scranton branch of Dunder Mifflin is located at 1725 Slough Avenue. That’s not a real street in the actual Scranton, Pennsylvania, though—it’s a reference to the original version of the show, which takes place in Slough, England.

10. The computers on set really worked. They even had Internet, which helped the cast feel like they were in a real-life office.

11. In the season two episode “Performance Review,” Michael reads papers from his suggestion box, including one from “Tom,” who wrote, “We need better outreach for employees fighting depression.” Then, he’s reminded that Tom killed himself. During a 2007 Office Convention, a group of writers proposed that this suicide was why the documentary crew showed up in Scranton. They wanted to document how the office was dealing with the suicide before turning to simpler storylines.

12. Steve Carell improvised his kiss with Oscar Nunez in the season three episode, “Gay Witch Hunt.” The script only called for a hug. Nunez recalled, “We were just supposed to hug, and he kept hugging me. And that particular take he came in really close, and I'm like, ‘Where is he going with this?’ Oh, dear, yes here we go.”

13. The actors weren’t the only ones who could improvise at any moment. In season five, Pam closes her dorm door on a camera person, who lets out an audible sigh. That was an impromptu moment from the director of photography, Randall Einhorn.

14. The writers had a clear vision for how Jim’s proposal to Pam would look. They wanted to shoot it at an actual rest stop on the Merritt Parkway, but it would have cost $100,000. Plus, they wouldn’t be allowed to use fake rain, which was important to the scene. So, the crew built a replica of the Parkway and a rest stop. The shot ended up costing $250,000. Daniels described the scene as “the most expensive and elaborate shot we've ever done, but it's also sort of the highlight of five years of storytelling.”

15. In 2011, the company Quill.com, owned by Staples, announced that they would start selling Dunder Mifflin paper. At the time, their director of innovation explained, “Paper…is a race to the bottom as paper usage is going down. We’re looking for different pop culture phenomena and external brands that we can tie to these mundane product categories to differentiate. That’s really how initially pairing copy paper and Dunder Mifflin came about.”

16. When Steve Carell left the show after seven seasons, he was still adored by the cast and crew. Up until that point, he had always been number one on the call sheet. So, when he left, they “retired” the number one, and it didn’t appear on the call sheet again.

17. Andy became manager in the final two seasons because he was a people person. Lieberstein, who was showrunner at the time, said, “The Andy character is very different from Michael, but one of the things they have in common is that they both put people first and relationships first.” The writers also considered promoting Darryl, but decided that he was “too rational and smart to be the manager,” so he couldn’t cause as many disasters.

18. James Spader was originally only supposed do a cameo in the seventh season finale, but the writers liked him so much that they asked him to expand the role.

19. The showrunners didn't tell network executives that Steve Carrell was going to appear in the finale. According to Daniels, “We shot the Steve stuff and we kept it out of the dailies and didn’t tell them about it. At the table reading, we gave the Steve Carell lines to Creed.”

20. After the show ended, Dwight was supposed to get a spinoff called The Farm on NBC, but the network passed on the show in 2012. According to Rainn Wilson, “The timing was wrong.”

21. Although The Farm never happened, and neither did a proposed Andy Bernard show based on An American Family, you can view Parks and Recreation as a kind of spinoff. It was developed by the same producers and was originally going to be a spinoff before Rashida Jones got cast after playing a separate character on The Office.

tv

George RR Martin's New Book, Fire and Blood, Is Getting Some Seriously Mixed Reviews

Jason Merritt, Getty Images
Jason Merritt, Getty Images

Many fans of George RR Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire series, a.k.a. the books that inspired HBO's smash hit Game of Thrones, were extremely peeved the acclaimed author was taking time to write a companion book, Fire and Blood, instead of finishing up the next book in the series, The Winds of Winter. But a new George RR Martin book is still a new George RR Martin book, and Fire and Bloodhas seen some brisk sales—even if the reviews have been rather mixed.

Let's start with the positive: The Sunday Times published a review in which it declared the book "a masterpiece of popular historical fiction." Writer Dan Jones wrote that, "Martin is an avid consumer and regurgitator of history: his Westeros writing pulses with influences from Plantagenet-era Britain and beyond." However, the critic does recognize the book itself is "a piece of epic procrastination."

Writing for The Times, critic Hugo Rifkind wasn't quite as kind:

"Essentially, it is all one long synopsis for about 50 books that he will never get around to writing, which itself has only been written because he can’t get around to writing the other two Game of Thrones books that his fans are waiting for. Worse still, after a doorstop of a thing, we’re still a century and a half short of GoT even beginning, which means there’s another volume of this interminable, self-indulgent crap to come."

Ouch.

Publishers Weekly didn't mince words either, writing: "Martin’s evocative storytelling style and gift for gripping narrative are mostly absent from this dry history. Fans hungry for the next Song of Ice and Fire novel will find this volume whets, but does not satisfy, their appetites."

We're sure Martin's writing is on par with his previous books, but it's just the content that people don't want. All we can really hope for moving forward is that the author is motivated to continue writing The Winds of Winter. In the meantime, if you want to form your own opinion, Fire and Blood is out now.

Sebastian Stan Still Doesn't Know If He's in Avengers 4

Michael Loccisano, Getty Images
Michael Loccisano, Getty Images

Since Avengers: Infinity War hit theaters earlier this year and pretty much ripped our hearts out with Thanos's deadly snap, Marvel fans have been speculating how our almighty heroes (and which ones) will return for the next film in the series. While audiences have yet to learn which characters from the last film will make it to Avengers 4, we would assume the MCU's stars would be clued in to their characters' fates. Though he may be playing coy, Sebastian Stan claims even he still doesn't even know whether or not he'll be a part of the as-yet-untitled film.

Marvel fans are in agreement that Bucky will be brought back to life at some point in the future. Stan is ​reportedly signed on for a nine-film contract, and will even star in a series alongside Anthony Mackie's Falcon for Disney+. But as for his Avengers 4 status, Stan is saying very little.

"When I was shooting anything, nobody ever told me what was part one or part two," Stan recently told ​Collider. "The truth is, I don’t even know if I’m in [Avengers 4]. What I shot was in part one. And anything that I shot may or may not have been in part one or part two and I still don’t know."

"There were things that we shot that were never gonna make it because it was easier to just convolute the whole thing. So in a way, you go ‘Alright, that’s cool, but ...,'" Stan continued. "But you know it’s going to deliver on a level that we probably haven’t even digested yet. Because that’s what they do best."

Stan is likely trying to stay away from spoilers and play it safe here. In fact, last year, the actor actually confirmed he would be in Avengers 4 to ​CinemaBlend. And while it's possible that the situation could have changed since, we're not quite buying it.

So good job, Sebastian Stan: you've thoroughly confused us. (But we're still pretty sure we'll see you in the next Avengers movie.)

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER