25 Things You Might Not Know About Harry Potter

It's going to get very spoilery in here, so only watch this if you've read the books and seen the movies. Or if you never plan on doing either, in which case you're making a terrible mistake. Transcript courtesy of Nerdfighteria.

1. Hi, I'm John Green. Welcome to my salon. This is mental_floss on YouTube. And did you know that in 2005 a doctor conducted a study to see if children had fewer trips to the emergency room immediately after Harry Potter books were released? And he was right.

In the weekends after The Order of the Phoenix and The Half-Blood Prince were released, there were half the amount of children at the E.R. in John Radcliffe Hospital compared with weekends directly before. It probably had something to do with the fact that, you know, they were all sitting on the couch reading all weekend rather than getting into trouble.

2. Okay, let's start with the books and move on to the movies. So the idea for Harry Potter came to J.K. Rowling when her train was delayed for four hours and the long wait gave her the right amount of time to develop the idea, you know, "Wizard school."

3. As you've probably heard, Rowling's manuscript got rejected about five times before it was finally published. The main complaint was that it was too long for children. I don't know what the problem is. The books actually seem quite small to me.

But of course it did get published, so let's talk about it.

4. J.K. Rowling and Harry Potter share the same birthday, July 31.

5. But that's not the only similarity she shares with a character. Rowling's favorite character is the otter, and that, of course, is Hermione's patronus. Interestingly, Ron's patronus is a Jack Russell Terrier, a breed of dog that likes to chase otters.

6. Rowling based the dementors in Harry Potter on her experience with depression. She's described depression as the, quote, "Cold absence of feeling," which is how dementors are presented.

7. In a 1999 interview for People magazine, Rowling announced that the last word of the series was going to be "scar." But the last word of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows is actually "well," which gives me hope for a Book Eight.

8. The love potion Amortentia smells different to everyone, depending on what they like. In the book, Hermione won't say out loud the third thing she smells in the potion, but Rowling has claimed that it's Ron's hair.

To me, that potion would smell like Ron Swanson. Whiskey, sawdust and breakfast food.

9. Many fans, including myself, do not understand why Hedwig had to die. But according to Rowling, the loss of Hedwig represented a loss of innocence and security. She has been almost like a cuddly toy to Harry at times. Voldemort killing her marked the end of childhood. Well yeah, but I don't want childhood to end, J.K. Rowling.

10. "Expecto Patronum" is Latin for "I await a protector." And that's not the only Latin phrase you can find in the series. Like Bellatrix, as in Bellatrix Lestrange, means "Female warrior." It makes sense, considering that Rowling was a classics major.

11. Speaking of names, Rowling found a lot of bizarre plant names for the series in a 17th Century book about herbs titled Culpepper's Complete Herbal.

12. Originally, Arthur Weasley was going to die at the end of The Order of the Phoenix, but then Sirius Black took his place, leaving Weasley to survive... to see one of his sons die and another lose an ear.

13. Stephen King once described Dolores Umbridge as the greatest make-believe villain to come along since Hannibal Lecter. And coming from someone who wrote about an evil car, that is high praise.

14. The driver and conductor of The Knight Bus, Stanley and Ernie, were named after Rowling's grandfathers.

15. J.K. Rowling is the first person ever to become a billionaire for book writing, and also the first book-writing billionaire ever to cease to be a billionaire by giving away so much money to charity.

16. All right, let's move on to the movies. Back in 2000, when Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone was being cast, Frankie Muniz and Haley Joel Osment were rumored to be in the running for the part of Harry.

17. Steven Spielberg wasn't interested in making the films. He said, I purposely didn't do the Harry Potter movie because for me, that was shooting ducks in a barrel. It's just a slam-dunk. It's just like withdrawing a billion dollars and putting it into your personal bank account.

So instead, he and Haley Joel Osment went off and made AI, and that didn't put a billion dollars in anybody's personal bank accounts.

18. When Rupert Grint auditioned for the films, he attempted to stand out by performing a rap.

19. Another person who auditioned for Ron? Tom Felton. He actually tried out for both Harry and Ron before getting cast as Malfoy.

20. As happens whenever you get a large group of children together, there was an outbreak of lice during the filming of The Chamber of Secrets.

21. And when they weren't getting lice, the kids would sneak candy onto the set. The robe pockets were so big that child actors would stick sweets and even drinks in them. Tom Felton takes credit for starting this trend, so he's to blame for the pockets eventually getting sewn shut by the wardrobe department.

22. Shirley Henderson, the actress who played the 14-year-old Moaning Myrtle, was 36 while filming The Chamber of Secrets. The Moaning Myrtles, by the way, is the name of one of my very favorite wizard rock bands. Other standout wizard rock artists include Draco and the Malfoys, Harry and the Potters, and The Whomping Willows.

23. Before the Deathly Hallows book was released, J.K. Rowling gave Alan Rickman some hints about Snape's true feelings so that he could properly play the character. This sometimes caused confusion on set when a director would ask Alan to do something and he would respond, "No, no, no, I can't do that. I know what is going to happen and you don't."

24. In the end credits of The Goblet of Fire, there's a note that reads, "No dragons were harmed in the making of this movie."

25. And finally, I return to my salon to tell you that Prisoner of Azkaban director Alfonso Cuarón asked Emma, Rupert and Daniel to write essays about their characters. Emma turned in a 16-page essay, Daniel's was one page long, and Rupert never turned it in at all.

More Videos...
44 Fictional Characters Whose Names You Don't Know
28 Foods Named After People
35 Jobs That No Longer Exist

Don't miss an episode—subscribe here! 

[Images and footage provided by Shutterstock.]

17 Bizarre Natural Remedies From the 1700s

In the late 1740s, John Wesley—a British evangelist and the co-founder of Methodism—published Primitive Physick, or, An Easy and Natural Method of Curing Most Diseases. The tome gave regular people ways to cure themselves with natural remedies, using items they could find in their own homes.

When in doubt, Welsey thought that drinking cold water or taking cold baths could cure most illnesses (including breast cancer); some of his suggestions, like using chamomile tea to soothe an upset stomach, have survived today. Other natural remedies he whipped up, though, are decidedly strange. Here are a few of them.

1. To Cure An Ague

Wesley describes an ague as “an intermitting fever, each fit of which is preceded by a cold shivering and goes off in a sweat.” There are many natural remedies for curing it, but all must be preceded by taking a “gentle vomit,” which, if taken two hours before the fit, Wesley says will generally prevent it, and may even cure the ague. If the vomiting fails, however, Wesley suggests wearing a bag of groundsel, a weed, “on the pit of the stomach, renewing it two hours before the fit.” The weed should be shredded small, and the side of the bag facing the skin should have holes in it.

Should this not work, Wesley suggests a remedy that requires a stronger stomach: “Make six middling pills of cobwebs, take one a little before the cold fit: Two a little before the next fit: The other three, if Need be, a little before the third fit. I never knew this fail.”

2. To Cure a Canine Appetite

Wesley turns to a Dr. Scomberg for the cure to this condition, which is defined by Wesley as “an insatiable desire of eating”: If there’s no vomiting, canine appetite “is often cured by a small Bit of Bread dipt in Wine, and applied to the Nostrils."

3. To Cure Asthma

Tar water, sea water, nettle juice, and quicksilver are all acceptable cures for what Wesley calls "moist Asthma" (which is characterized by “a difficulty of breathing … the patient spits much”). But a method that “seldom fails,” Wesley says, is living “a fortnight on boiled carrots only.”

Dry and convulsive asthma, meanwhile, can be treated with toad, dried and powdered. “Make it into small pills,” Wesley writes, “and take one every hour until the convulsions fade.”

4. To Prevent or Cure Nose Bleeds

Drinking whey and eating raisins every day, Wesley says, can help prevent nose bleeds. Other methods for preventing or curing the phenomenon include “hold[ing] a red hot poker under the nose” and “steep[ing] a linnen rag in sharp vinegar, burn[ing] it, and blow[ing] it up the nose with a Quill.”

5. To Cure a “Cold in the Head”

Getting rid of this common ailment is easy, according to Wesley: Just “pare very thin the yellow rind of an orange," he writes. "Roll it up inside out, and thrust a roll inside each nostril.”

6. To Cure “An Habitual Colick”

Today's doctors define colic as a condition suffered by "a healthy, well-fed infant who cries for more than three hours per day, for more than three days per week, for more than three weeks." But adults can get it, too; it's characterized by severe stomach pains and spasms (which, we now know, can be an indication of other conditions, like Crohn's disease and irritable bowel syndrome). To cure it, Wesley suggests this odd remedy: “Wear a thin soft Flannel on the part.”

6. To Cure “White Specks in the Eye”

While it's unclear exactly what "white specks in the eye" actually is—eye floaters, maybe—Wesley suggests that, when “going to bed, put a little ear-wax on the Speck.—This has cured many.”

7. To Cure the Falling Sickness

Those who suffer from this illness “fall to the ground, either quite stiff, or convulsed all over, utterly senseless, gnashing his teeth, and foaming at the mouth.” To cure the condition, Wesley recommends “an entire milk diet for three months: It rarely fails.” During fits, though, “blow up the nose a little powder’d ginger.”

8. To Cure Gout

“Regard not them who say the gout ought not to be cured. They mean, it cannot,” Wesley writes. (They, here, might be referring to regular practitioners of medicine.) “I know it cannot by their regular prescriptions. But I have known it cured in many cases, without any ill effect following.” Gout in the foot or hand can be cured by “apply[ing] a raw lean beef-steak. Change it once in 12 hours, ‘till cured.”

Curing the gout in any limb can be accomplished by beginning this ritual at six in the evening: “Undress and wrap yourself up in Blankets. — Then put your Legs up to the Knees in Water, as hot as you can bear it. As it cools, let hot Water be poured in, so as to keep you in a strong Sweat till ten. Then go into a Bed well warm'd and sweat till Morning. — I have known this to cure an inveterate Gout.”

9. To Cure Jaundice

Wesley suggests curing jaundice—which turns the skin and whites of the eyes yellow (thanks to too much bilirubin in the blood, we now know)—by wearing "leaves of Celandine upon and under the feet." Other possible cures include taking a small pill of Castile soap in the morning for eight to 10 days, or "as much lies on a shilling of calcin’d egg-shells, three mornings fasting; and walk till you sweat.”

10. To Cure “The Iliac Passion”

This decidedly unpleasant condition—which Wesley defines as a “violent kind of Colic ... the Excrements are thrown up by the mouth in vomiting,” eww—has a few cures, including “apply[ing] warm Flannel soaked in Spirits of Wine.” Most delightful, however, is the cure recommended by a Dr. Sydenham: “Hold a live Puppy constantly on the Belly.”

11. To Cure “the Palpitation or Beating of the Heart”

Among the remedies for this ailment are the mundane “drink a Pint of cold Water,” the stinky-but-probably-not-effective “apply outwardly a Rag dipt In vinegar,” and the very exciting “be electrified” (which is suggested for a few other illnesses as well).

12. To Cure Pleurisy

This illness is characterized by “a Fever attended with a violent pain in the Side, and a Pulse remarkably hard.” (It's caused, we now know, when the double membrane that surrounds the lungs inside the chest cavity becomes inflamed.) Wesley’s first suggested remedy involves applying “to the Side Onions roasted in the Embers, mixt with Cream." Next up is filling the core of an apple with frankincense “stop[ping] it close with the Piece you cut out and roast[ing] it in Ashes. Mash and eat it.” Sounds delicious!

13. To cure Quinsy

“A quinsy,” Wesley explains, “is a Fever attended with Difficulty of Swallowing, and often Breathing.” (Today, the condition is called peritonsillar abscess and it's known to be a complication of tonsillitis.) He suggests applying “a large White-bread Toast, half an Inch thick, dipt in Brandy, to the crown of the Head till it dries.”

14. To Cure “A Windy Rupture”

Wesley doesn't say what, exactly, this condition is, though a Google search brings up the term hernia ventosa, which another medical book of the same time defines as a "false hernia ... where the wind is pent up by the coats of the Testes, inflating and blowing up the inguen," or the groin area. Wesley prescribes the following method to cure it: “Warm Cow-dung well. Spread it thick on Leather, [throwing] some cummin seeds on it, and apply it hot. When cold, put on a new one.” This, he says, “commonly cures a Child (keeping his Bed) in two Days.”

15. To Cure a "Tooth-ach"

Wesley suggests being electrified through the tooth. If that’s too extreme for you, try “rub[bing] the Cheek a Quarter of an Hour ... Or, put[ting] a Clove of Garlick into the Ear.”

16. To Stop Vomiting

Induced vomiting was an important part of Wesley's medical theories (remember the "gentle vomit" that could stop the ague?). But if a patient was vomiting and it wasn't a part of the prescribed method for curing him, Wesley advised "after every Vomiting, drink a pint of warm water; or, apply a large onion slit, to the Pit of the Stomach."

17. To Heal a Cut

Wesley suggests holding the cut closed "with your thumb for a quarter of an hour" (what we might call applying pressure these days), then dipping a rag in cold water and wrapping the cut in it. Another method: "Bind on toasted cheese," Wesley writes. "This will cure a deep cut." Pounded grass, applied fresh every 12 hours, will also do the trick.

Costco Is Selling Enormous Tubs of Your Favorite Gluttonous Delights—Here Are 5 of Them

iStock.com/mphillips007
iStock.com/mphillips007

Costco's grocery department is perhaps the only place in America where you can get a $5 rotisserie chicken, a $1.50 hot dog and soda combo, and 7-pound bucket of Nutella all under one roof. The tub of hazelnut spread isn't the only food you can buy in bulk, either. Whether you're catering a wedding on a budget or restocking your doomsday shelter, here are five foods you can buy online—and in some stores—that come in outrageous portions.

1. A nearly 7-pound tub of Nutella

Sometimes, a small jar of Nutella just won't do. For those who can't get enough of the chocolatey hazelnut spread, Costco offers a bigger size—to the tune of 6.6 pounds. It costs $22, which is about $14 cheaper than splurging on 14 smaller jars weighing 7.7 ounces apiece. As Thrillist points out, in-store deals are only available to Costco members, but anyone can take advantage of discounts when they order online.

2. 23 pounds of macaroni & cheese

If bathing in macaroni and cheese is on your bucket list, now's your chance. Costco offers a $90 tub filled with 23 pounds of elbow macaroni and cheddar sauce mix, all of which comes in a "heavy duty" 6-gallon bucket. With enough food to serve 180 people, it's designed to last up to 20 years "if stored in a dry, cool environment"—so yes, it's bunker-approved. (Although, sadly, it's currently out of stock.)

3. A lifetime supply of honey

Given the uncertain future of honeybees (and by extension, honey), it might not be a bad idea to stock up on the sweet, sticky stuff. Costco's 40-pound tub of GloryBee Clover Blossom Honey costs $127. Considering that a 48-ounce jar of honey costs $27 on GloryBee's website, this represents savings of more than $200.

4. Emergency rations of mashed potatoes

This bucket of food is explicitly designed for surviving rather than feasting, but who's to say that a sudden craving for mashed potatoes or mac and cheese isn't an emergency? Costco's Emergency Food kit contains a one-month supply of various foods, including oatmeal, cheddar cheese grits with green chilies, chicken-flavored vegetable stew, and a rice and orzo pilaf. It will set you back $115, but again, it has a shelf life of 20 years.

5. 60 servings of freeze-dried breakfast skillet

Mountain House's breakfast skillet comes in six coffee-sized cans rather than one oversized bucket, but it still serves the same purpose. For $160, you get 60 servings of scrambled eggs mixed with hash browns, pork sausage, peppers, and onions. Just be sure to add the right amount of water, unless you like your eggs runny.

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER