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12 Stories Behind Film Production Nightmares

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Universal Pictures

A movie's finished product can often belie the insane struggle it took to make it; even Hollywood's worst offerings sometimes end up looking far better than they should. Here are 12 stories behind famous film productions where everything went wrong and nothing felt right.

1. Alien 3

After four years of developing an Aliens sequel, Alien 3 went into production with David Fincher in the director's chair in 1991. Before Fincher came aboard, two directors passed on the project (Renny Harlan and Vincent Ward) and Twentieth Century Fox had sunk $7 million into pre-production and development. Due to this investment, the studio announced a release date for summer 1992 before a screenplay could be finalized.

Because they had already constructed expensive sets before determining a concrete storyline, Alien 3 had to revolve around whatever they built. This meant that the film focused on Ellen Ripley being trapped on a prison planet with an alien baby inside of her, despite the fact that teaser trailers suggested that the Xenomorphs would come to Earth to wreak havoc on humanity.

David Fincher went into production unprepared to deal with heavy studio interference and creative limitations, and re-writes and re-shoots frustrated the young director. He eventually left the project before post-production started.

"My first movie, it's fairly well known, was a disaster. I stupidly felt that the people financing it had more to lose then I did if it was bad," Fincher told BBC One in 2011. "I sort of allowed myself to be steered into this communal making and then when the shit hits the fan, all of a sudden everyone scatters and you're the guy saying 'Wait? Who has a suggestion now?' So (now) that if I'm going to take the blame, the brunt of it, I'm going to make the decisions."   

2. Waterworld

Shooting a movie on the open water is almost always a bad idea, namely because you have no control over the weather or the sea. Waterworld's initial $100 million budget, which was the highest ever for a Hollywood film at the time, ballooned to $175 million after production wrapped in 1994. This was mainly due to the cost of transporting extras from land to shooting locations in the middle of the sea, a large number of watercrafts breaking down, and an expensive set floating away.

“Logistically, it's crazy,” director Kevin Reynolds told Den of Geek. “Each day you shoot on the atoll with all those extras, we had to transport those people from dry land out to the location and so you're getting hundreds of people through wardrobe and everything, and you're putting them on boats, transporting them out to the atoll, and trying to get everybody in position to do a shot. And then when you break for lunch, you have to put everybody on boats and take them back in to feed them.”

On top of rising production costs, Kevin Costner nearly drowned when he was caught in a squall, jellyfish frequently attacked and stung the cast, and Joss Whedon had to be flown in for last minute re-writes on the script. Whedon later described the experience as "seven weeks of hell." He also referred to himself as the "world's highest-paid stenographer," because of all the notes he had to take from Kevin Costner and studio executives.

While it's unclear if Kevin Reynolds walked off the project or if he was fired, Kevin Costner had to finish the film with only two weeks left in production. In the end, critics panned Waterworld and it became one of the biggest box office bombs in history when it was released during the summer of 1995.

3. The Shining

Stanley Kubrick was notorious for shooting multiple takes for his scenes. During the production of The Shining, Kubrick demanded Shelley Duvall perform the iconic baseball bat scene with Jack Nicholson 127 times to get the terror and horror just right. That's merely one example of how difficult the director could be to his stars during the 13-month shoot.

Script pages would often change from day-to-day with Kubrick and co-screenwriter Diane Johnson filing constant re-writes. The practice was so frequent that Jack Nicholson refused to learn any of his lines until he got on set because he knew that they would change just before shooting anyway. Shelley Duvall was under constant stress due to many arguments with the director about her acting and her character, Wendy Torrance. Kubrick wanted Duvall to be on edge in a constant state of fear and isolation, which eventually made her physically ill.

In an interview with Roger Ebert in 1980, Shelley Duvall described working with Stanley Kubrick as "almost unbearable, but from other points of view, really very nice, I suppose."

4. Heaven's Gate

After winning an Academy Award for Best Picture and Best Director for The Deer Hunter in 1978, Michael Cimino followed up on its success with the notorious Heaven's Gate—and almost bankrupted the movie studio that made it, United Artists. Cleared for a budget of $11 million, its production cost soared to $44 million (about $122 million in 2014) when the film was delivered in December 1980. This was due to Cimino's precise attention to detail that included multiple takes, tearing down and re-building expensive sets, and, in one case, waiting for the "right cloud" to pass the frame. As a result, Michael Cimino shot over one million feet of film (about 220 hours of footage), which cost the studio almost $220,000 a day.

At one point, United Artists tried to fire Cimino, but his contract with the studio prevented his termination from the project. Once shooting completed, Michael Cimino worked tirelessly with editor William H. Reynolds to produce a final cut of Heaven's Gate, which had a running time of five hours and 25 minutes. United Artists refused to release Cimino's cut and demanded a shorter version, which clocked in at two hours and 48 minutes. Critics trashed it for being excessive, unfocused, and an overall disaster. It was also a box office bomb, taking in only $3.4 million in 1980.

5. World War Z

The film adaptation of Max Brooks' best-selling novel World War Z initially had a December 2012 release date, but it was later pushed to summer 2013 when production woes and delays plagued the project. With less than three weeks left in production, Damon Lindelof and Drew Goddard were brought in to re-write its third act and ending. "The script needed months of work, not days," a studio source told Vulture in 2012. "And changes were needed throughout the film, not just at the end."

However, at this time, Brad Pitt and Marc Forster were no longer speaking to each other and a studio executive had to be brought to World War Z's shooting location in Budapest to intermediate. While the production was on hiatus, Lindelof and Goddard spent a few weeks re-tooling World War Z's ending, and Paramount issued a new budget for seven additional weeks of re-shoots.

According to Vulture's initial reports, "Pitt, not Forster, who has final approval over all the new pages generated by whatever writers work on the project over the next three weeks. And the communication breakdown between actor and director over how to reshoot it severely limits Paramount’s ability to foresee an end to production." A new ending was shot that focused on smaller action set-pieces and made the film more about a man trying to get back to his family instead of a man trying to save the world from extinction.

World War Z opened in June 2013 to moderate critical acclaim and a $540 million worldwide box office with a sequel in the works with Juan Antonio Bayona replacing Marc Forster as director. 

6. Apocalypse Now

After the success of The Godfather Part II, Francis Ford Coppola struggled for five years to bring Apocalypse Now to the big screen. Coppola eventually assembled a large cast and crew in the Philippines for a five-month shoot that quickly turned into 16 months of brutal filming due to the country's torrential weather.

Production shut down after two months because some of its sets and locations were lost during a typhoon and had to be re-built or re-located and its lead Martin Sheen—who replaced Harvey Keitel who Coppola felt wasn't right for the role after one week of shooting—suffered a heart attack. Due to numerous delays, crewmembers and cast were either held on location in hotels or transported back to the United States for weeks at a time, which resulted in a ballooning budget. The film's payroll was also stolen.

Although Apocalypse Now was slated for a May 1978 release date, it was pushed to August 1979 because of continuing delays during post-production. Since Coppola had a tough time shooting the film, he was unable to adequately capture jungle and military sound effects, so a majority of its sound had to be re-recorded.

The making of Apocalypse Now can be seen in the documentary Hearts of Darkness.

7. The Abyss

James Cameron has a reputation as "the scariest man in Hollywood" because of his demanding and dictatorial shooting style. While Titanic and Avatar had their fair share of production nightmares, The Abyss might have been the most grueling and emotionally depleting shoot of Cameron's career.

A majority of The Abyss takes place deep underwater—mix that with James Cameron's on-set demeanor and you get a number of production horror stories and near-death experiences for the Academy Award-winning director and his cast.

On the first day of shooting, the main, 150,000 gallon water tank sprung a leak, and its repairs contributed to the budget going over $4 million. Safety was one of the most important things during production, so a decompression chamber was built onsite and each actor was assigned a safety diver and bell in the event of drowning or decompression sickness.

James Cameron almost drowned when trying to map out a shot in a flooding room, while Ed Harris and Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio were under severe mental and physical stress because of the production's slow pace and submerged shoots. During one of the multiple takes during Dr. Lindsey Brigman's death scene, the camera ran out of film, which led to a frustrated Mastrantonio storming off the set yelling, "We are not animals!"

"I knew this was going to be a hard shoot, but even I had no idea just how hard. I don't ever want to go through this again," said Cameron. "The Abyss was a lot of things. Fun to make was not one of them," said Mastrantonio.

8. Twilight Zone: The Movie

During the shooting of the John Landis-directed "Time Out" subsection of Twilight Zone: The Movie, star Vic Morrow and child actors Myca Dinh Le and Renee Shin-Yi Chen were brutally killed during a freak helicopter accident. The scene was part of the story's original ending that involved Morrow's character traveling back in time to save two children when a U.S. Army helicopter attacks a small Vietnamese village.

The accident occurred when a stunt pilot had trouble navigating a low-flying helicopter through smoke and debris created from pyrotechnic effects. An explosion caused it to fly out of control, and it crash landed on top of the three actors, killing them instantly.

The accident led to almost a decade of litigation and court action. In the end, Twilight Zone: The Movie's filmmakers and producers were all acquitted of manslaughter. "There was absolutely no good aspect about this whole story. The tragedy, which I think about every day, had an enormous impact on my career, from which it may possibly never recover," said John Landis of the accident and aftermath in 1996.

9. The Island of Doctor Moreau

Richard Stanley, the original director on The Island of Doctor Moreau, was fired after three days of shooting. While it's unclear why New Line Cinema canned him, it's believed that it was due to on-set clashes with Val Kilmer. John Frankenheimer was hired to take over directing duties after production shut down for a few weeks. Despite the pause in shooting, The Island of Doctor Moreau's script wasn't completed, and pages were still being submitted as filming wore on. During this time, actor Rob Morrow left the production and David Thewlis was brought in to replace him.

Frankenheimer only took the job because he wanted to work with Marlon Brando, who was difficult throughout production. Brando refused to learn any of his lines, so a small radio transmitter was placed in his off-camera ear and words were fed to him while filming. Frankenheimer and Brando didn't get along with Val Kilmer, and the trio constantly argued during production. "There are two things I will never ever do in my whole life. The first is that I will never climb Mt. Everest. The second is that I will never work with Val Kilmer ever again," Frankenheimer said after The Island of Doctor Moreau's release.

10. Fitzcarraldo

Director Werner Herzog went through a nightmare production while making Fitzcarraldo in the early '80s. The film follows Brian Sweeney Fitzgerald, an Irish would-be rubber industrialist who is determined to transport a steamer ship through a South American jungle to a vast rubber territory in Peru during the early 20th century. Herzog wanted to give the film absolute realism, so he made his film crew transport a real 30-ton steamer ship through a dangerous jungle instead of using miniatures or special effects, resulting in a long and grueling production.

Star Jason Robards left the film due to dysentery and his role had to be re-cast with Klaus Kinski, who didn't get along with Herzog during filming. A famous rumor has it that one of the extras offered to kill Kinski for Herzog because he was so difficult to work with, but the director declined the offer because he needed him to finish the picture.

Mick Jagger also had a role in Fitzcarraldo, but he was ultimately cut when The Rolling Stones' touring schedule conflicted with re-shoots. Herzog had to re-start production after almost half of the film was completed and a year into shooting.

The making of Fitzcarraldo is documented in the film Burden of Dreams.  

11. American Graffiti

The city of San Rafael, California revoked American Graffiti's production license and permits after one day of night shooting when local merchants and business owners complained about the noise to the city council. Filming was forced to move to Petaluma, which is about 20 miles north of San Rafael.

During production, Harrison Ford was arrested for taking part in a bar fight, a crewmember was arrested for growing marijuana, and someone set George Lucas' motel room on fire. The night before shooting pivotal close-ups, Richard Dreyfuss suffered a huge gash on his forehead after Paul Le Mat threw him in a swimming pool. Additionally, two cameramen were almost killed while shooting the film's climatic drag race scene.

12. Ishtar

Ishtar is known as one of the biggest fiascos in filmmaking history. Warren Beatty produced the movie for Elaine May as a favor for taking an uncredited screenwriting role on his Academy Award-winning film Reds in 1981. Beatty believed that Ishtar would raise Elaine May's reputation as a top-notch filmmaker in Hollywood, but, in reality, it ended her career as a director.

Shooting began on Ishtar in Morocco and in the real Sahara Desert instead of a studio backlot. This decision put the production in the middle of high tensions between the Moroccan military and guerrilla factions, and dunes were checked daily for land mines.

May's directing style included multiple takes and shooting hours and hours of footage and, as a result, Ishtar's budget ballooned from $27.5 million to $51 million. Elaine May and Warren Beatty didn't get along during production either, while Dustin Hoffman worked as an intermediary between the two filmmakers.

In-fighting continued into post-production, as three separate teams of editors were brought in to shape Ishtar for Elaine May, Warren Beatty, and Dustin Hoffman, who all had input in the final cut. "I've had a lot of trouble with all my movies," May told Movieline in 2011. "I'll just admit that. I didn't want to direct—I wanted director approval [as a writer]."

Critics panned the film and audiences ignored it. Ishtar only grossed $14 million when it opened in May 1987. "If all of the people who hate Ishtar had seen it, I would be a rich woman today," said the director.

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25 Things You Might Not Know About Home Alone
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On November 16, 1990, what appeared to be a fun-filled little family yarn about a kid left to his own devices at Christmastime and forced to fend off a couple of bungling burglars became an instant classic. Today, no holiday movie marathon is complete without a viewing of Home Alone, the movie that turned Macaulay Culkin into one of the biggest kid stars of all time. And while you may be able to recite its dialogue line for line, here are 25 things you might not know about the John Hughes-penned picture. So settle in and enjoy, ya filthy animals. 

1. WITHOUT UNCLE BUCK, THERE’D BE NO HOME ALONE.

The idea for Home Alone occurred to John Hughes during the making of Uncle Buck, which also starred Macaulay Culkin. Always game to play the precocious one, there’s a scene in which Culkin’s character interrogates a potential babysitter through a mail slot. In Home Alone, Culkin has a similar confrontation with Daniel Stern, this time via a doggie door.

2. THE ROLE OF KEVIN WAS WRITTEN SPECIFICALLY FOR MACAULAY CULKIN.

But that didn't stop director Chris Columbus from auditioning more than 100 other rascally pre-teens for the part. Which really was all for naught, as Culkin nailed the role.

3. MACAULAY WASN’T THE ONLY CULKIN TO APPEAR IN THE FILM.


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Macaulay's younger brother Kieran also landed a part, as Kevin’s bed-wetting cousin, Fuller. Though the film marked Kieran’s acting debut, he has since gone on to build an impressive career for himself in movies like The Cider House Rules, Igby Goes Down, and Scott Pilgrim vs. the World.

4. CASTING CULKIN TAUGHT CHRIS COLUMBUS A VERY IMPORTANT LESSON.

Since Home Alone, Columbus (who also wrote the scripts for Gremlins and The Goonies) has gone on to become one of Hollywood’s premier family-friendly moviemakers as the director of Home Alone 2, Mrs. Doubtfire, and two movies in the Harry Potter franchise. But one lesson he learned from Home Alone is that when you agree to work with a kid actor, you’re also agreeing to work with his or her family.

“I was much younger and I was really too naive to think about the family environment as well,” Columbus told The Guardian in 2013. “We didn't know that much about the family at the beginning; as we were shooting, we learned a little more. The stories are hair-raising. I was casting a kid who truly had a troubled family life.” In 1995, Culkin’s parents, who were never married, engaged in a very public—and nasty—legal battle over his fortune. 

5. THE FILM IS A GUINNESS WORLD RECORD HOLDER.

In its opening weekend, Home Alone topped the box office, making $17,081,997 in 1202 theaters. The movie maintained its number one spot for a full 12 weeks and remained in the top 10 until June of the following year. It became the highest grossing film of 1990 and earned a Guinness World Record as the highest-grossing live-action comedy ever domestically.

6. THE MOVIE’S UNPRECEDENTED SUCCESS LED TO ITS TITLE BECOMING A VERB.


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In his book The Big Picture: Who Killed Hollywood? And Other Essays, two-time Oscar-winning screenwriter William Goldman admitted that the unexpected success of Home Alone contributed a new phrase to the Hollywood lexicon: to be Home Aloned, meaning that other films suffered at the box office because of Home Alone’s long and successful run. “More than one executive said to me, ‘My picture did 40, but it would have done 50 if it hadn’t been Home Aloned,’” wrote Goldman.

7. IT SPAWNED MORE THAN A SEQUEL.

While all of the main, original cast members reprised their roles for Home Alone 2: Lost In New York (with Columbus again directing a script by Hughes), the success of the original led to a full-on franchise, complete with four sequels, three video games, two board games, a novelization, and other kid-friendly merchandise (including the Talkboy). 

8. POLAND LOVES THE MCCALLISTERS.

Showings of Home Alone have become a Christmas tradition in Poland, where the film has aired on national television since the early 1990s. And its popularity has only increased. In 2011 more than five million people tuned in to watch it, making it the most watched show to air during the season. 

9. THE MCCALLISTER HOME HAS BECOME A MAJOR TOURIST ATTRACTION.


A Syn via Flickr / CC BY-SA 2.0

Located at 671 Lincoln Avenue in Winnetka, Illinois, the kitchen, main staircase, and ground-floor landing seen in the film were all shot in this five-bedroom residence. (The dining room and all other first-floor rooms, with the exception of the kitchen, were shot on a soundstage.) In 2012, John and Cynthia Abendshien, who owned the home when it was used as one of the film’s locations, sold the property for $1.585 million.

10. KEVIN’S TREE HOUSE WAS NOT PART OF THE DEAL.

Kevin’s backyard tree house was not originally part of the property. It was constructed specifically for the movie and demolished once filming ended. 

11. ALL OF THE FILM WAS SHOT IN THE CHICAGO AREA.

Though the main plot point is that that McCallister family is in Paris while Kevin’s back home in Illinois, the production was shot entirely within the Chicago area. The scenes supposedly set at Paris-Orly Airport were shot at O’Hare International Airport. And those luxurious business class seats they’re taking to Paris? Those were built on the basketball court of a local high school—the same school where the scene in which Kevin is running through a flooded basement was filmed (the “basement” in question was actually the school’s swimming pool). 

12. ROBERT DE NIRO TURNED DOWN THE ROLE OF HARRY LIME.


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As did Jon Lovitz. Then Joe Pesci swept in and made the part his own. Bonus fun fact: The character is a slight homage to Orson Welles. (It was the name of Welles’ character in Carol Reed’s The Third Man.) 

13. JOE PESCI GOT ALL METHOD ON MACAULAY CULKIN.

In order to get the most authentic performance possible, Joe Pesci did his best to avoid Macaulay Culkin on the set so that the young actor would indeed be afraid of him. And no one would blame the young actor for being a bit petrified, as he still bears the physical scar from one accidental altercation. “In the first Home Alone, they hung me up on a coat hook, and Pesci says, ‘I’m gonna bite all your fingers off, one at a time,’” Culkin recalled to Rule Forty Two. “And during one of the rehearsals, he bit me, and it broke the skin.” 

14. PESCI WASN’T USED TO THE WHOLE “FAMILY-FRIENDLY” THING.

Considering that Pesci’s best known for playing the heavy in movies like Raging Bull, Goodfellas, and Casino, it’s understandable that he wasn’t quite used to the whole family-friendly atmosphere on the set of Home Alone—and dropped a few f-bombs as a result of that. Columbus tried to curb Pesci’s four-letter-word tendency by suggesting he use the word “fridge” instead. 

15. DANIEL STERN HAD A FOUR-LETTER WORD SLIP-UP, TOO.


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And it wasn’t cut out of the film. He utters the word “s***” when attempting to retrieve his shoe through the doggie door (look for it at the 55:27 mark on the DVD). 

16. IN REAL LIFE, HARRY AND MARV MAY NOT HAVE SURVIVED KEVIN’S ATTACK.

BB gun shots to the forehead and groin? A steaming hot iron and can of paint to the face? A flaming blowtorch to the scalp? The Wet Bandits endure an awful lot of violence at the hands of a single eight-year-old. So much so that neither one of them should have been walking—let alone conscious—by the end of the night. In 2012, Dr. Ryan St. Clair diagnosed the likely outcome of their injuries at The Week. While a read-through of the entire article is well worth your time, here are a few of the highlights: That iron should have caused a “blowout fracture,” leading to “serious disfigurement and debilitating double vision if not repaired properly.” And the blowtorch? According to Dr. St. Clair, “The skin and bone tissue on Harry's skull will be so damaged and rotted that his skull bone is essentially dying and will likely require a transplant.” 

17. THE ORNAMENTS THAT MARV STEPS ON WOULD CAUSE THE LEAST AMOUNT OF DAMAGE.

"Walking on ornaments seems pretty insignificant compared to everything else we've seen so far,” said Dr. St. Clair. “If I was Marv, I'd be more concerned about my facial fractures.” Fortunately, the "glass" ornaments in question were actually made of candy. (But just to be on the safe side, Stern wore rubber feet for his barefoot scenes.)

18. THE TARANTULA ON STERN’S FACE? YEP, THAT WAS REAL.


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At one point, Kevin places a tarantula on Marv’s face. And it was indeed a real spider (Daniel Stern agreed to let it happen—but he’d only allow for one take). What wasn’t real? That blood-curdling scream. In order to not frighten the spider, Stern had to mime the scream and have the sound dubbed in later.

19. JOHN CANDY WRAPPED IN ONE DAY.

But what a long day it was: Twenty-three hours to be exact. Candy was a regular in many of John Hughes’ movies, and Gus Polinski—the polka-playing nice guy he plays in Home Alone—was inspired by his character in Planes, Trains & Automobiles. 

20. KEVIN’S OLDER SISTER IS A JUDO CHAMP.

Two years after appearing in Home Alone, Hillary Wolf—who played Kevin’s older sister Megan—landed the lead in Joan Micklin Silver’s Big Girls Don’t Cry… They Get Even. She also appeared in Home Alone 2, but hasn’t been seen on the big screen since. But there’s a good reason for her absence: In 1996 and 2000, she was a member of the Summer Olympic Judo team for the U.S.

21. DON’T BOTHER TRYING TO FIND ANGELS WITH FILTHY SOULS.

The Jimmy Cagney-like gangster movie that Kevin channels as his inspiration throughout Home Alone? Don’t bother searching for it on eBay. It’s not real. Nor is its sequel, Angels With Even Filthier Souls, which is featured in Home Alone 2. 

22. OLD MAN MARLEY WASN'T IN THE ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY.

Kevin’s allegedly scary neighbor, who eventually teaches him the importance of family, wasn’t a character in the original script. He was added at the suggestion of Columbus, who thought the film could do with a stronger dose of sentimentality.

23. THE LYRIC OPERA OF CHICAGO BENEFITED FROM THE MOVIE’S SNOWFALL.

When filming of Home Alone wrapped, the production donated some of the artificial snow they had created (the stuff made from wax and plastic) to the Lyric Opera of Chicago. It has since been used in a number of their productions.

24. MARV WAS SUPPOSED TO HAVE GOTTEN A SPINOFF.

Greg Beeman’s 1995 film Bushwhacked, which stars Daniel Stern as a delivery guy on the run after being framed for murder, was originally intended to be a spinoff of Home Alone. The storyline would have been essentially the same: After giving up a life of crime, Marv would have been framed for the same murder.

25. IF YOU BELIEVE THAT ELVIS IS STILL ALIVE, THEN YOU MIGHT BELIEVE THAT HE IS IN HOME ALONE.

No hit movie would be complete without a great little conspiracy theory. And in the case of Home Alone, it’s that Elvis Presley—who (allegedly?) died in 1977—makes a cameo in the film. Yes, that’s right. The King is alive and well. And making a living as a Hollywood extra.

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The Mystery Science Theater 3000 Turkey Day Marathon Is Back
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For many fans, Mystery Science Theater 3000 is as beloved a Thanksgiving tradition as mashed potatoes and gravy (except funnier). It seems appropriate, given that the show celebrates the turkeys of the movie world. And that it made its debut on Thanksgiving Day in 1988 (on KTMA, a local station in Minneapolis). In 1991, to celebrate its third anniversary, Comedy Central hosted a Thanksgiving Day marathon of the series—and in the more than 25 years since, that tradition has continued.

Beginning at 12 p.m. ET on Thursday, Shout! Factory will host yet another Mystery Science Theater 3000 Turkey Day marathon, hosted by series creator Joel Hodgson and stars Jonah Ray and Felicia Day. Taking place online at ShoutFactoryTV.com, or via the Shout! Factory TV app on Apple TV, Roku, Amazon Fire and select smart TVs, the trio will share six classic MST3K episodes that have never been screened as part of a Shout! Factory Turkey Day Marathon. Here’s hoping your favorite episode makes it (cough, Hobgoblins, cough.)

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