CLOSE

16 Out-of-Context IKEA Instructions to Help You Live a Better Life

Printed without words, IKEA instructions are meant to be used around the globe. Someone in Tokyo can build his KLÄPPE swivel chair from the same booklet as a college kid in her Maryland dorm.

This saves the Swedish furniture manufacturer tons of money in printing costs, but it also serves a surprising purpose: Taken out of context, certain pages and details from IKEA instruction books can be interpreted as guides to living a fuller and more happy life. Here are 16 examples.

1. Relax

You earned it. Follow steps 1-3 as shown above for maximum relaxation. If you don't feel like going all the way, stop at step 2. This is you time.

2. Wash Your Garbage

Sanitation workers will appreciate and even look forward to your spring-fresh bag of trash on collection days.

3. Attach Wheels to Your Pet Starfish

Now he's the fastest echinoderm on the block. Look at him go!

4. The Area Behind the Knee is Very Sensitive

It's a little-known erogenous zone, as demonstrated by the shaded "heat" sphere above.

5. There's Your Wallet

Right there, underneath that thing with all the other wallets.

6. Have a Beer

Long day? Kick back with a cold one or two, which will be floating in space for you to grab when you're ready.

7. Stefan Is Gone

And he's never coming back. Time to move on.

8. Check Under and Inside Your Grand Piano Twice a Year

There may be loose change or even forgotten treats that have accumulated down there. Best to make sure.

9. Don't Be Glum

There's a daybed right behind you. Lie down for a bit and think about things that'll cheer you up. Remember the Home Improvement episode where Tim enters the lawn mower race? That was a good one. Think about that.

10. Diving Boards Make Great Presents

Attach a bow to the bottom to give your gift some decorative flair.

11. Look Up

There, at those branches. Fall is around the corner; you can tell by how the leaves are changing color.

12. Do Squats

A great butt isn't given, it's earned.

13. Start At the Top Right Square for Tic-Tac-Toe

It's the secret to winning this classic game.

14. Fonzie Melted

Fold up what's left of the King of Cool for easy storage.

15. You Only Really Need Two Keys

Why are you lugging around that loaded keychain? Free up some much-needed pocket space by streamlining.

16. No Sketches of Punch and Judy

A hastily drawn outline doesn't do these beloved characters justice.

[All images from IKEA product instructions. Source Products: Karlstad, IKEA PS, Mysinge, Pax Tonnes, Premiar, Rakke, Rationell, Smaldal, Stefan, Tylosand, Udden, Verner, Vreta]

arrow
Afternoon Map
Monthly Internet Costs in Every Country

Thanks to the internet, people around the world can conduct global research, trade tips, and find faraway friends without ever leaving their couch. Not everyone pays the same price for these digital privileges, though, according to new data visualizations spotted by Thrillist.

To compare internet user prices in each country, cost information site HowMuch.net created a series of maps. The data comes courtesy of English market research consultancy BDRC and Cable.co.uk, which teamed up to analyze 3351 broadband packages in 196 nations between August 18, 2017 and October 12, 2017.

In the U.S., for example, the average cost for internet service is $66 per month. That’s substantially more than what browsers pay in neighboring Mexico ($27) and Canada ($55). Still, we don’t have it bad compared to either Namibia or Burkina Faso, where users shell out a staggering $464 and $924, respectively, for monthly broadband access. In fact, internet in the U.S. is far cheaper than what residents in 113 countries pay, including those in Saudi Arabia ($84), Indonesia ($72), and Greenland ($84).

On average, internet costs in Asia and Russia tend to be among the lowest, while access is prohibitively expensive in sub-Saharan Africa and in certain parts of Oceania. As for the world’s cheapest internet, you’ll find it in Ukraine and Iran.

Check out the maps below for more broadband insights, or view HowMuch.net’s full findings here.

Map of Internet costs in each country created by information site HowMuch.net.
HowMuch.net

Map of Internet costs in each country created by information site HowMuch.net.
HowMuch.net

Map of Internet costs in each country created by information site HowMuch.net.
HowMuch.net

Map of Internet costs in each country created by information site HowMuch.net.
HowMuch.net

Map of Internet costs in each country created by information site HowMuch.net.
HowMuch.net

[h/t Thrillist]

nextArticle.image_alt|e
iStock
arrow
fun
Can You Figure Out Why the Turtles Bulge in This Optical Illusion?
iStock
iStock

Ready for a little vision test? Akiyoshi Kitaoka, a Kyoto-based psychologist who studies visual illusions, created this eye-bending image that appears to bulge and bend. In the image, shared on Syfy.com, the horizontal and vertical lines actually run straight across and down, but they look like they ripple, and the shapes (Kitaoka calls them turtles) look like they’re different shades of gray, even though they’re an identical color.

As Phil Plait explains for Syfy, the key is in the corners—the turtle “legs,” if you will. “At each vertex between turtles, they form a rotated square divided into four smaller squares," he writes. "Note how they're offset from one another, giving a twist to the vertices.” If you zoom in closely on the image, the lines begin to straighten out.

The difference in the colors, meanwhile, is a result of the contrast between the black and white pixels outlining the turtles. If the outlines of the turtles were entirely black or entirely white, instead of a combination, the grays would look identical. But the contrast between the two fools your eyes into thinking they're different.

To see more of Kitaoka’s illusion art, you can follow him on Twitter @AkiyoshiKitaoka. Then, go check out these other amazing optical illusions.

[h/t Syfy]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios