10 TV Shows You Can Stream Right Now to Fill the Stranger Things Void

A scene from Netflix's The OA.
A scene from Netflix's The OA.
Nicola Goode, Netflix

The third season of Stranger Things has been out for more than a month now, and along with some record-breaking viewership numbers comes the inevitable post-binge depression that crops up whenever your favorite show goes on hiatus for another year (for Stranger Things, it’s traditionally closer to a year and a half). But fear not: While the series’ blend of horror, sci-fi, humor, and heart might seem impossible to imitate, it’s not the only show that ticks all those boxes. So if you’re looking to fill that Stranger Things-shaped hole in your heart, these 10 shows should do the trick.

1. The X-Files

The original sci-fi/horror/supernatural/paranormal mishmash, The X-Files managed to outclass other genre shows at the time by crafting a quirky, offbeat, inimitable tone that the rest simply couldn’t compete with. Like Stranger Things, the whole series is awash in government conspiracies, shadowy agencies, unexplained phenomena, and a cast of characters hellbent on getting to the bottom of it all. Best of all? If you like it, there are 11 seasons to catch up on.

Where to watch it: Amazon Prime Video (seasons 1-9), Hulu (seasons 1-11)

2. The OA

The OA is like Stranger Things’s far weirder, far artsier little brother. And while it was just unfortunately canceled by Netflix, the two seasons we do have are musts for anyone interested in trippy sci-fi shenanigans. The show centers on Prairie Johnson (Brit Marling), a blind woman who returns after having been missing for seven years—but now she has mysterious scars on her back and somehow regained her sight. From there, viewers are introduced to a world of malicious scientists, immoral experiments, alternate dimensions, and a lot of confusion (but in a good way), as Prairie—who has dubbed herself The OA, or “Original Angel”—reveals more about her mysterious disappearance and apparent resurrection. It’s more of a straight-faced head-scratcher than Stranger Things, but don’t let that dissuade you from embracing The OA’s world.

Where to watch it: Netflix

3. Wayward Pines

Mysterious disappearances, creepy small towns, a smattering of sci-fi and horror—the Duffer Brothers definitely have a type. Before the duo went to Netflix with Stranger Things, they had a stint serving as writers and producers for director M. Night Shyamalan’s like-minded Fox drama, Wayward Pines. In this series, Matt Dillon stars as U.S. Secret Service Agent Ethan Burke, who’s investigating the disappearance of two agents before ending up trapped in the seemingly idyllic town of Wayward Pines, Idaho, which soon enough opens itself up to all manner of conspiracies and unsavory villains.

Where to watch it: Hulu

4. Twin Peaks

Before the Duffer Brothers breathed life into the fictional town of Hawkins, Indiana, there was Twin Peaks, Washington, the titular suburb at the heart of director David Lynch’s surreal mystery drama about (among many other things) the murder of homecoming queen, Laura Palmer. Its effortless blend of surreal imagery, small-town horror, and twisting narratives influenced countless series currently in your streaming queue, but Stranger Things honored Lynch’s formula far better than most.

Where to watch it: Hulu, Netflix, Amazon Prime Video

5. Orphan Black

Orphan Black is a sci-fi thriller that focuses on a woman named Sarah Manning (played by Tatiana Maslany) who witnesses the suicide of a complete stranger who just so happens to look exactly like her. This sets off a chain of events that sees Manning embroiled in a clone conspiracy as she faces off against an amoral corporation and an extremist religious cult, both of which have their own intentions for Manning and her newfound "sisters." Even if the heady mystery goes over your head, Orphan Black is worth watching simply for Maslany's powerhouse performance as an ever-increasing group of clones, all with different personalities.

Where to watch it: Amazon Prime Video

6. Runaways

In this adaption of the Marvel comic by writer Brian K. Vaughan, a new type of superhero team takes center stage, starring a cast of diverse, powered-up teenagers tasked with battling their parents, who are pretty much secret super villains. It’s full of the usual conspiracies, aliens, and religious cults, but this series is automatically better than most because the character Arsenic (Ariela Barer) can telepathically control a dinosaur named Old Lace (a reference for you Frank Capra fans). Stranger Things gave the world a group of underaged underdogs to root for, and Runaways follows suit—just with a whole host of crazy powers.

Where to watch it: Hulu

7. Chilling Adventures of Sabrina

If your knowledge of Sabrina begins and ends with the light-hearted Melissa Joan Hart sitcom from the ‘90s, prepare to do a complete 180 with Chilling Adventures of Sabrina. In this updated take on the Archie Comics classic, Netflix has gone full-on blasphemous, throwing Sabrina and her world head-on into occult machinations and hellish plot lines, punctuated with stylish visuals and a touch of black humor. Like Stranger Things, Sabrina takes its supernatural world and throws it right into a small town and pits these terrors against the might of a hero who isn’t even old enough to drive yet.

Where to watch it: Netflix

8. Buffy the Vampire Slayer

Buffy the Vampire Slayer took a different stab at horror tropes by bringing a sharp wit and unique braininess to the world of monsters, vampires, and the undead—and it pulled it all off with a high-school heroine (Sarah Michelle Gellar) who proved to be a far more worthy action hero than most square-jawed, big-screen lunkheads. Creator Joss Whedon’s take on TV horror has a sublime quirkiness to it that helped set the stage for the offbeat world of Hawkins, Indiana.

Where to watch it: Hulu

9. Dark

If you’re looking for a series that goes a bit deeper and a little darker than Stranger Things, this German export from Netflix has you covered. On the surface, Dark covers familiar ground—like the disappearance of a child in a small town and a (partial) '80s setting—but this show's time-travel twists set it far apart from the goings-on in Hawkins. At the center of the vanishing children and reality-bending wormholes in Dark are the past, present, and future sins of four families: the Kahnwalds, Nielsens, Tiedemanns, and Dopplers. Expectations get subverted and characters are never quite what they seem in this one. Word of warning: Dark gets a little complex, so you may want to keep this online flowchart handy to make sense of these twists and turns. One quick note: Netflix defaults to a version with dubbed English dialogue, but do yourself a favor and switch to the original German audio with English subtitles. It's far less distracting, and easier to follow. 

Where to watch it: Netflix

10. The Toys That Made us

If your favorite part about Stranger Things is the ‘80s-soaked nostalgia factor, you can dive further into the era of excess with Netflix’s The Toys That Made Us. In this documentary series, each episode focuses on the history and cultural impact of one iconic toyline from decades past—spanning everything from He-Man and G.I. Joe to Barbie and Hello Kitty. There’s surprising depth and detail in every installment, as you’ll learn the backstory, production process, and key business decisions that helped turn these hunks of plastic into pop culture touchstones. And later this year, the show will premiere both a third season and a spin-off titled The Movies That Made Us, with one episode focusing solely on another Stranger Things crew favorite: Ghostbusters.

Where to watch it: Netflix

The First Full Trailer for The Crown Season 3 Is Here

Des Willie, Netflix
Des Willie, Netflix

Star Wars obsessives aren't the only people in for a trailer treat today: Nearly two years after the second season of The Crown debuted, the award-winning series about the early days of Queen Elizabeth II's reign is just weeks away from its return. And on Monday morning, Netflix released the first full trailer for The Crown's new season.

While we've known some of the basic details about the new season—like the time frame in which it takes place and that Olivia Colman and Tobias Menzies would be taking over the roles of Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip—this is the first in-depth glimpse we've gotten at what's in store for season 3.

The role duty plays in the lives of the British royal family appears to be an overarching theme, with the trailer showing the country in distress but each of the characters putting on a smiling face for the public. While Elizabeth and Philip's relationship will continue to take center stage in the pricey period drama, Princess Margaret (now played by Helena Bonham Carter) will struggle with her role of being the Queen's sister. And Prince Charles (Josh O'Connor) will have to choose between his love for Camilla Parker Bowles (played by Killing Eve writer Emerald Fennell) and his duty as the heir apparent to the throne.

Netflix will debut The Crown season 3 on November 17, 2019.

10 Facts About the Beastie Boys's 'Sabotage' Video

Beastie Boys via YouTube
Beastie Boys via YouTube

With their raucous mix of rock and hip-hop, the Beastie Boys were a band everyone could love. They also made killer music videos, and their 1994 video for “Sabotage” is arguably one of the greatest in the history of the medium. Directed by Spike Jonze and inspired by ‘70s cop shows, “Sabotage” finds the Beasties in cheesy suits, wigs, and mustaches, cavorting around L.A. like a bunch of bootleg Starskys and Hutches. If you were alive in the ‘90s, you’ve seen “Sabotage” a million times, but there’s a lot you might not know about this iconic video.

1. It all began with a photo shoot.

Spike Jonze met the Beastie Boys when he photographed them for Dirt magazine in the early 1990s. The band showed up with its own concept. “For years, Beastie Boy Adam Horovitz had been talking about doing a photo session as undercover cops—wearing ties and fake mustaches and sitting in a car like we were on a stakeout,” Adam “MCA” Yauch told New York Magazine. Jonze loved the idea so much he tagged along when the Beasties went wig shopping. “Then, while he was taking the pictures, he was wearing this blond wig and mustache the whole time,” Yauch said. “For no apparent reason.” So was born a friendship that begat “Sabotage.”

2. Spike Jonze filmed “Sabotage” without permits.

The Beasties weren’t big fans of high-budget music videos with tons of people on the set. So they asked Jonze to hire a couple of assistants and run the whole production out of a van. “Then we just ran around L.A. without any permits and made everything up as we went along,” MCA told New York. They’re lucky the real cops never showed up.

3. The Beastie Boys did all their own stunt driving.

After binge-watching VHS tapes of The Streets of San Francisco and other ‘70s cop shows, the Beasties knew they needed some sweet chase scenes. “We bought a car that was about to die,” Mike D told Vanity Fair. “We just drove the car ourselves. We almost killed the car a couple of times, but we definitely didn’t come close to killing ourselves.”

4. “Sabotage” inspired the opening sequence of Trainspotting.

Danny Boyle's 1996 film Trainspotting famously opens with Ewan McGregor and his buddies running through the streets of Edinburgh to the tune of Iggy Pop’s “Lust for Life.” In the DVD commentary, Boyle revealed that the scene was inspired by “Sabotage.”

5. Two cameras were harmed in the making of “Sabotage.”

“Sabotage” was supposed to be a low-budget affair—and it would’ve been, had Jonze been a little more careful with his rented cameras. He destroyed a Canon Scoopic when the Ziploc bag he used to protect the camera during an underwater shot proved less than airtight. He apparently told the rental agency the camera stopped working on its own, but he wasn’t as lucky when an Arriflex SR3 fell out of a van window. That cost $84,000, effectively tripling the cost of the video.

6. MCA crashed the stage of the MTV Video Music Awards to protest “Sabotage” being shut out.

At the 1994 MTV VMAs, “Sabotage” was nominated for five awards, including Video of the Year. In one of the great injustices of all time, it lost in all five categories. When R.E.M.’s “Everybody Hurts” won Best Direction, MCA invaded the stage dressed as Nathanial Hörnblowér, his Swiss uncle/filmmaker alter-ego. “Since I was a small boy, I had dreamed that Spike would win this,” MCA said as a confused Michael Stipe looked on. “Now this has happened, and I want to tell everyone this is a farce, and I had the ideas for Star Wars and everything.”

7. There’s a “Sabotage” comic book you can download for free.

After MCA’s death in 2012, artist Derek Langille created a seven-page “Sabotage” comic book in tribute to the fallen musician and filmmaker. You can download it for free here.

8. There’s also a “Sabotage” novel.

To celebrate the 25th anniversary of “Sabotage,” Oakland-based author and Beasties super-fan Jeff Gomez wrote a five-act novel inspired by the video. He spent months researching cop movies and real-life police lingo, and he watched “Sabotage” about 100 times, keeping a detailed spreadsheet of all the action unfolding onscreen. “They created a really great universe, and I just wanted to play around in it for a little bit,” Gomez told PBS.

9. There’s a “Sabotage”/Sesame Street mashup on YouTube.

In 2017, YouTuber Is This How You Go Viral, a.k.a. Adam Schleichkorn, created the video “Sesametage,” a reimagining of “Sabotage” made with edited bits of Sesame Street. It stars Big Bird as himself, The Count as Cochese, and Oscar the Grouch as Bobby, “The Rookie.” Super Grover, Telly, Cookie Monster, and Bert and Ernie also turn up in this hilarious spoof of a spoof.

10. “Sabotage” nearly became a movie—kind of.

Jonze and the Beasties had such a blast making “Sabotage” that they wrote a script for a feature film called We Can Do This. The movie, which they later abandoned, was set to feature MCA in two roles: Sir Stuart Wallace, one of his “Sabotage” characters, and Nathaniel Hörnblowér (whom he portrayed during that 1994 VMAs protest). Jonze told IndieWire the film would’ve been “ridiculous and fun,” which sounds like the understatement of the century. “There were no 1970s cops in it, but it was definitely in the same spirit,” he said.

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