11 Wonderful Former Disney Rides

daveland
daveland

Since Disneyland's opening in 1955, and Disney World's in 1971, a lot of attractions have come and gone. Disney likes to hold on to its successful rides, but some were too costly, or just not popular enough; others were just collateral damage for newer and more exciting rides (the fact that Disney World's Mr. Toad's Wild Ride closed still stings). These rides are lost, but not forgotten. Let us look back at the nostalgic graveyard of defunct Disney rides. 

1. Phantom Boats // Disneyland, 1955 – 1956

This ride never stood a chance. Lasting just a year, its big problem was that it was too boring. Originally called the Tomorrowland Boats, this ride featured slowly moving white vessels that visitors could drive around the lagoon. On August 16, 1955, they were rechristened The Phantom Boats and redesigned with tailfins that were apparently a mechanical nightmare; the boats left park-goers stranded in the middle of the lake and undoubtedly very unhappy. The boats' last appearance was in the summer of 1956, making it the first ride to be removed from Disneyland.

2. Submarine Voyage // Disneyland, 1956 - 1998

Inspired by the USS Nautilus, the first nuclear-powered submarine, The Submarine Voyage replaced the Phantom Boats. Passengers could board the Disneyland Nautilus—or one of the other seven submarines—for a fanciful re-creation of the actual craft's journey to the North Pole. Although the submarines never actually went underwater, bubble jets gave the illusion of diving deeper and props were scattered throughout the track. Patrons could see sea monsters, turtles, glowing fish, and even mermaids. You can check out this video from 1959 to see what it was like:

The ride stayed mostly the same for its duration, with the exception of a new coat of yellow paint in the mid-'80s. A similar ride opened in Disney World called 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea in 1971, and due to costs, the Florida ride was shut down in 1994, followed by the California version in 1998. The original Submarine Voyage was renovated to become a new ride. Today, you can hop in a submarine and see your favorite Disney fish in the Finding Nemo Submarine Voyage. 

3. Flying Saucers // Disneyland, 1961 - 1966

The Flying Saucers ride was sort of a mix between bumper cars and air hockey. Giant saucers big enough for an average-sized person to sit on were propelled across an arena by air valves; riders shifted their weight to direct the craft where they wanted to go. It was popular, but suffered from a lot of problems when larger guests tried to ride. As a result, it closed for good in 1966. Today, the spot is occupied by Space Mountain.

4. Astro Jets // Disneyland, 1956 - 1966

Located in the heart of Tomorrowland, this delightfully retro-futuristic ride gave patrons a great view of the park. Each rocket was big enough to snugly fit two riders and came with a lever that made it go up and down. Rocket Jets, a similar spinning ride with more modern-looking jets, eventually replaced the ride in 1967.

5. Rainbow Mountain Stagecoach Ride // Disneyland, 1956 - 1959

The stagecoaches in Frontierland gave visitors a chance to get the feel for transportation in the Wild West. After deciding whether to sit up top or inside, riders were transported back in time and through the Living Desert. The scenery featured balancing boulders, cartoonish cacti, and interesting rock formations. Unfortunately, the stagecoaches had a tendency to tip over and spook the mules; breakaway harnesses resulted in stranded passengers and missing mules—yikes!

6. Rainbow Caverns Mine Train // Disneyland, 1956 - 1977 

The mine train also went through the Living Desert, but unlike the stagecoaches, this ride brought its passengers into the rainbow caverns. Riders were transported through a beautiful cavern illuminated by beautifully colorful lakes and waterfalls. After the ride, patrons exited through the Mineral Hall, where rocks glow with the power of a black light. 

The ride was expanded in 1960, and became the Mine Train Through Nature's Wonderland. This new and improved ride now featured robotic animals, fossils, and Cascade Peak, a large mountain complete with waterfall. The ride was replaced by the rollercoaster Big Thunder Mountain Railroad in 1979, and most of the remnants have been bulldozed or removed. 

7. Delta Dreamflight // Disney World, 1989 - 1998

This ride aimed to encourage visitors to travel the world, and more importantly, to use Delta Airlines to do it. The attraction featured a hodge-podge of projection screens, animatronics, and pop-up storybook style sets. Passengers waited in an area fashioned to look like a terminal, and climbed into painted blue cars. The guests would then “take off” and travel through the ride. The ride was replaced by Buzz Lightyear's Space Ranger Spin in 1998. 

SEE ALSO: 13 Facts About Disney’s Haunted Mansion

8. Adventure Thru Inner Space // Disneyland 1967 - 1985

Patrons of this ride would start by climbing into "Atommobiles." These cars would slowly enter a giant microscope, where the riders would then be "shrunk down" to microscopic size. (People waiting on line would watch the visitors ahead of them shrink and disappear.) After passing through the microscope, passengers were then shot into a snowflake. This simulation was created by moving the cars back and forth while bringing them through a dark tunnel. The tiny navigators emerged from the dark tunnel and were welcomed by gigantic falling snowflakes. As the riders shrunk in size, the sights changed: giant snowflakes became molecules, and molecules broke down to atoms. Up on top, a giant eye watched the ride through a microscope. The ride was eventually replaced by Star Tours in 1986.

9. PeopleMover // Disneyland 1967 - 1995

The PeopleMover was a lot like Florida’s Tomorrowland Transit Authority PeopleMover. Made to seem like the transportation mode of the future, these trains took patrons on a 16-minute ride around the park. The loading was done with some hustle: the train cars never stopped and doors closed automatically. After hopping inside, riders got a nice view of Tomorrowland. The ride was closed in 1995 in an effort to save money, but it remains standing.

10. Flight to the Moon // Disneyland 1967 – 1975

Previously called Rocket to the Moon, Flight to the Moon took place beside the Moonliner, the giant spaceship in the middle of Tomorrowland. At the time, the ship was the tallest thing in the park. The attraction inside was more like a simulation than a ride; visitors would sit in chairs surrounded by projectors, and the chairs would vibrate as the screens showed images of the moon. In 1975, the ride changed to Mission to Mars since, by then, humans had already been to the moon. No word on what the next iteration will be when we finally make it to Mars. 

11. Journey Into Imagination // Disney World 1983 - 1998 

Like many other Disney rides, this one has seen many different incarnations. The current ride is called Journey into Imagination with Figment, but Figment didn’t always have such a large role. In the original ride, the passengers glided through what seemed like clouds. A bearded man with a top hat and goggles would fly over to the guests and introduce himself as “Dreamfinder.” He drove a contraption that collected dreams and the guests came along for the ride. The visitors are shown multiple rooms with different themes, like art, literature, and science. Today, the ride focuses on the five senses and Figment is in every scene (although Dreamfinder is nowhere to be found).


11 Facts About the Library of Congress

Thomas Jefferson Building of the LOC. Image Credit: TheAgency via Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 3.0
Thomas Jefferson Building of the LOC. Image Credit: TheAgency via Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 3.0

For more than two centuries, the Library of Congress (LOC) and its staff have served as invaluable resources for American legislators. But their mission isn’t limited to U.S. politics. The Library of Congress catalog includes iconic films, historical documents, and your tweets about lunch. In short, it's a cultural treasure. Here are 11 facts worth knowing about the Washington, D.C.-based establishment.

1. The Library of Congress is the nation's oldest cultural institution.

Founded in 1800, the Library of Congress is America’s oldest federal cultural institution. It was established by the same bill that officially moved the capital from Philadelphia to Washington D.C. The library was conceived of as a resource available exclusively to members of Congress, containing "such books as may be necessary for the use of Congress." That remains the case today, though citizens can read books on site or request them at their local library through an interlibrary loan.

2. Thomas Jefferson helped rebuild the Library of Congress catalog after a fire.

Not long after it was established, tragedy struck the Library of Congress: Its contents were destroyed when the Capitol Building was set on fire by British troops during the War of 1812. Approximately 3000 books (mostly law-related) were lost in the blaze, but luckily a friend of Washington D.C. owned a collection that was even bigger. Thomas Jefferson’s personal library comprised well over 6000 volumes, making it the largest library in the country at the time. He agreed to sell all of his books to Congress for $23,950 in 1815. Jefferson's contributions significantly expanded the scope of the library, by including books on art, science, and philosophy. (The increased diversity of the collection was a subject of criticism at the time, to which Jefferson responded by saying "there is in fact no subject to which a member of Congress may not have occasion to refer.”) Sadly, the library met with another tragedy when a second fire tore through it on Christmas Eve 1851, burning two-thirds of Jefferson’s contribution.

3. James Madison first proposed the Library of Congress.

Seventeen years prior to the LOC's official formation, James Madison proposed the idea of a special library for Congress. He planted the idea as a Continental Congress member in 1783 when he suggested compiling a list of books to which lawmakers could refer. As president, Madison approved the purchase of Jefferson’s personal library in 1814.

4. It makes Congress's job a lot easier.

Members of Congress drafting legislation don’t necessarily need to do the nitty-gritty research themselves: There’s a whole team [PDF] of lawyers, librarians, economists, and scientists employed through the Library of Congress to do it for them. Established in 1914, the Congressional Research Service (CRS) is a legislative department within the LOC responsible for supporting lawmakers through every step of the lawmaking process. Based on what’s asked of them, CRS employees supply House and Senate members with reports, briefings, seminars, presentations, or consultations detailing research on the issue in question. The CRS is currently staffed with 600 analysts. In any given year, a single researcher responds to hundreds of congressional requests.

5. It's the largest library on Earth.

With over 164 million items in its inventory, the LOC is the world’s largest library. In addition to the 38 million books and other printed materials on the premises, the institution contains millions of photographs, recordings, and films. It also houses some record-breaking collections: more maps, comics, newspapers, and phonebooks can each be found there than any other place on Earth. The whole thing is stored on about 838 miles of bookshelves.

6. The Library of Congress contains some surprising items.

The Library of Congress is home to an eclectic collection, with books ranging in size from a tiny copy of “Ole King Cole” to a 5-foot-by-7-foot photo book filled with color images of Bhutan. Some items, like a Gutenberg Bible and a rough draft of the Declaration of Independence, feel right at home in the historic library. Others, like Rosa Parks’s peanut butter pancakes recipe, are a bit more unexpected. Additional noteworthy artifacts include Bob Hope’s joke collection, George Gershwin’s piano, and the contents of Abraham Lincoln's pockets the night he was shot.

7. The Library of Congress owns materials from around the world.

The Library of Congress isn’t solely dedicated to American documents. The institution possesses materials acquired from all around the globe, including 3 million items from Asia and 10 million items in the Iberian, Latin American, and Caribbean collections. Over half of the books in their inventory are written in a language other than English. In total, over 460 languages are represented, and their end goal is to eventually have at least one item from every nation. The LOC also maintains overseas offices in New Delhi, India; Cairo, Egypt; Islamabad, Pakistan; Jakarta, Indonesia; Nairobi, Kenya; and Rio de Janeiro, Brazil to acquire, catalog, and preserve items that might be hard to access otherwise.

8. It preserves America's most important films.

Since the National Film Preservation Act was passed in 1988, 700 "culturally, historically, or aesthetically" significant films have been selected for the LOC archives. Up to 25 entries are chosen each year by a board of industry professionals, and the only rule is that submissions must be at least 10 years old. Beyond that, they can be anything from beloved comedy blockbusters like Ghostbusters (1984) to health class classics like The Story of Menstruation (1946). Pieces added to the National Film Registry are kept in a climate-controlled storage space where they can theoretically last for centuries.

9. The Library of Congress serves patrons of all abilities.

In 1931 the Library of Congress launched The National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped (NLS). Today the service offers free Braille and audio books, either through digital downloads or physical deliveries, to people with visual impairments or other issues that limit their reading abilities. Offerings include a wide array of books and magazines, as well as the world’s largest collection of Braille music. NLS librarians are currently undertaking the painstaking process of scanning every sheet of Braille music onto their computer system. Once that project is complete, the National Library Service’s entire collection will be fully digitized.

10. Only three librarians of Congress have been actual librarians.

When nominating someone to head the largest library in the world, presidents rarely choose actual librarians. They’re more likely to select a scholar, historian, or some other veteran of academia for the job. Of the 14 Librarians of Congress we’ve had, current title-holder Carla Hayden is one of just three to come into the role with prior librarian experience. (She is also the first woman and the first African American to hold the job.) On top of running the world’s largest library, Hayden is also responsible for managing relations with Congress, selecting the Poet Laureate, and overseeing the U.S. Copyright Office.

11. It receives every public tweet you write.

The government isn’t just responsible for cataloging tweets coming out of the White House. In 2010, Twitter agreed to donate every public tweet in its archive to the Library of Congress. That amounts to several hundred million tweets a day. In addition to documenting the rise and fall of #dressgate and live tweets of The Walking Dead, the archive would also act as an invaluable data source for tracking language and societal trends. Unfortunately, that archive isn’t much closer to being completed than the day the deal was announced. The LOC has yet to develop a way to organize the information, and for the past seven years, unprocessed tweets have been have been stored out of sight on a server. There’s still no word on what the next step will be, but that might change with the newest Librarian of Congress. Unlike her predecessor, Carla Hayden is known for taking a digital-forward approach to librarianship.

Merriam-Webster Just Added Hundreds of New Words to the Dictionary—Here Are 25 of Them

iStock.com/xxz114
iStock.com/xxz114

The editors of Merriam-Webster's dictionary know better than most people how quickly language evolves. In April 2019 alone, they added more than 640 words to the dictionary, from old terms that have developed new meanings to words that are products of the digital age.

Entertainment fans will recognize a few of the new words on Merriam-Webster's list: Buzzy (generating speculation or attention), bottle episode (an episode of a television series confined to one setting), and EGOT (winning an Emmy, a Grammy, an Oscar, and a Tony) have all received the dictionary's stamp of approval.

Some terms reflect the rise of digital devices in our everyday lives, such as unplug and screen time. Other words have been around for centuries, but started appearing in new contexts in recent years. According to Merriam-Webster, snowflake can now mean “someone who is overly sensitive," purple can describe an area split between Democrat and Republican voters, and Goldilocks can mean “an area of planetary orbit in which temperatures are neither too hot nor too cold to support life."

You can read 25 of the new words below. And for even more recent additions to the dictionary, check out Merriam-Webster's list from last September.

  1. Bioabsorbable

  1. Bottle episode

  1. Bottom surgery

  1. Buzzy

  1. EGOT

  1. Garbage time

  1. Gender nonconforming

  1. Geosmin

  1. Gig economy

  1. Go-cup

  1. Goldilocks

  1. On-brand

  1. Page view

  1. Peak

  1. Purple

  1. Vulture capitalism

  1. Qubit

  1. Salutogenesis

  1. Screen time

  1. Snowflake

  1. Stan

  1. Tailwind

  1. Top surgery

  1. Traumatology

  1. Unplug

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