15 Things You Might Not Know About South Carolina

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1. When South Carolina's state government was established, John Rutledge was chosen as its first leader. He is one of two men to have held the government title of “President of South Carolina” before the state government’s leader became known as a “governor” in 1779. The first governor of South Carolina? John Rutledge.

2. South Carolina is probably your thyroid gland's favorite state. Prior to becoming the Palmetto State, South Carolina was known as the Iodine State, and then the Iodine Products State – it was even printed on the license plates.

3. The state flag of South Carolina features a white palmetto tree on an indigo background. The palmetto was added in 1861 to the existing white crescent of the original 1775 version as a tribute to Colonel William Moultrie's 1776 defense of a palmetto-log fort against a British attack. The crescent is a reproduction of a silver emblem worn on the caps of flag designer Moultrie’s Revolutionary War soldiers.

4. The first opera performed in the United States debuted in Charleston in 1735. The opera performed was not South Carolina's official state opera, Porgy and Bess. Rather, it was the comic ballad opera Flora which, in addition to the eponymous Flora, features such characters as Sir Thomas Testy and Tom Friendly.

5. Tap dancer Clayton “Peg Leg” Bates was born in Fountain Inn, South Carolina. Despite losing his leg in a cotton gin accident as a boy, Bates became a well-known dancer, appearing on The Ed Sullivan Show more than 20 times. His signature move was known as the “Imitation American Jet Plane” and involved his jumping in the air and landing on his peg leg with his other held up behind him.

6. Shag dancing, which is the official South Carolina state dance, is thought to have originated in Myrtle Beach. Shag is a descendent of the Jitterbug in the dance family tree. The Little Apple is Shag’s dance grandparent.

7. But please plan on doing your shagging Monday through Saturday; it is illegal for dance halls to operate on Sundays in South Carolina.

8. Major League pitcher Bill Voiselle wore number 96 – making him the only Major League baseball player ever to wear the name of his hometown (Ninety Six, South Carolina) as his uniform number.

9. Morgan Island, off the coast of South Carolina, is home to a large population of rhesus monkeys. The monkeys were originally moved to the island in 1979 for research purposes and are owned by the National Institutes of Health.

10. Don’t forget that Sumter is home to the world’s largest ginkgo farm – 1,200 acres full of potential memory improvement.

11. The state snack food of South Carolina is boiled peanuts.

12. The Thoroughbred Racing Hall of Fame and Museum is located in Aiken, South Carolina. Some of the best-named inductees in the Hall of Fame: Politely, Relaxing, Lamb Chop, Late Bloomer, and Christmas Past.

13. If you’re looking for the first boll weevil found in South Carolina, you can find it on display at the Pendleton District Agricultural Museum, where you can also find pre-1925 farm equipment, Cherokee artifacts and a replica of the McCormick reaper.

14. Step aside, Loch Ness Monster. South Carolina's Lake Murray reportedly has its very own water monster known as “Messie.” Sightings have been frequent enough for the South Carolina Fish and Wildlife Department to start a file to keep track of the spottings. According to an official charged with keeping track of reports, “I’ve talked to ten or twelve people that have seen it. They were reputable, not on drugs or drinking.”

15. Let’s just hope Messie never gets hungry enough to launch a summer attack on Lake Murray’s Bomb Island, where upwards of 750,000 purple martins roost each late summer afternoon. Designated as an official bird sanctuary, no one is allowed on the island during those months, not even Messie.

Everything You Need to Know About the New DC Universe Streaming Service

Brenton Thwaites stars in DC Universe's Titans
Brenton Thwaites stars in DC Universe's Titans
Warner Bros. Television

by Natalie Zamora

Although the fates of two major DC superheroes, Superman and Batman, are kind of up in the air right now as far as for their Extended Universes, things are looking up for the franchise, as their exclusive streaming service has just launched. Here's everything you need to know about DC Universe.

THE SIGNIFICANCE

With all the different types of streaming services we have today, why is DC Universe so special, and why would someone pay for it if they can find the content elsewhere? Well, this streaming service allows all your favorite DC content to live in one space. Instead of having to search for what you want throughout the internet, you can find it all here. For the die-hard fan, this is perfect.

DC Universe offers an impressive collection of live-action and animated movies, TV shows, documentaries, and comic books. The service also offers exclusive toys you can only get by being a subscriber.

THE CONTENT

Heath Ledger stars as The Joker in 'The Dark Knight' (2008)
© TM & DC Comics/Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.

So, what exact DC content lives on DC Universe? Well, there's a range of content from recent to old-school, such as Batman: The Animated Series, The Dark Knight, Teen Titans, and Constantine. Apart from what's on there now, the service will be debuting the live-action Titans series later this year, along with Swamp Thing and Doom Patrol in 2019. DC is also developing new series for Harley Quinn and Young Justice: Outsiders, exclusively for the service.

THE PRICE

​To get all of this exclusive DC content, it must be expensive, right? No, not really. Compared to Netflix, which is $10.99 a month, DC Universe is inexpensive, at a rate of $7.99 monthly or $74.99 annually. It is a bit pricier than Hulu, however, which is $5.99 monthly for the first year, then $7.99 monthly after. Like most streaming services, you can also try a free seven-day trial with DC Universe.

HOW TO SIGN UP

​Are you sold? If so, the sign up process is fairly simple. Head to ​DC Universe, create an account, and choose your plan, either monthly or annually. Either way, you'll get your free seven-day trial to browse around and see for yourself if it's really worth it.

10 Classic Books That Have Been Banned

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iStock

From the Bible to Harry Potter, some of the world's most popular books have been challenged for reasons ranging from violence to occult overtones. In honor of National Book Lovers Day, here's a look at 10 classic books that have stirred up controversy.

1. THE CALL OF THE WILD

The Call of the Wild, Jack London's 1903 Klondike Gold Rush-set adventure, was banned in Yugoslavia and Italy for being "too radical" and was burned by the Nazis because of the author's well-known socialist leanings.

2. THE GRAPES OF WRATH

Though The Grapes of Wrath—John Steinbeck's 1939 novel about a family of tenant farmers who are forced to leave their Oklahoma home for California because of economic hardships—earned the author both the National Book Award and a Pulitzer Prize, it also drew ire across America because some believed it promoted Communist values. Kern County, California (where much of the book took place) was particular incensed by Steinbeck's portrayal of the area and its working conditions, which they considered slanderous.

3. THE LORAX

The cover of Dr. Seuss' The Lorax
Google Play

Whereas some readers look at the title character Dr. Seuss's The Lorax and see a fuzzy little guy who "speaks for the trees," others saw the 1971 children's book as a dangerous piece of political commentary, with even the author reportedly referring to it as "propaganda."

4. ULYSSES

James Joyce's 1922 novel Ulysses may be one of the most important and influential works of the early 20th century, but it was also deemed obscene for both its language and sexual content—and not just in a few provincial places. In 1921, a group known as The New York Society for the Suppression of Vice successfully managed to keep the book out of the United States, and the United States Post Office regularly burned copies of it. But in 1933, the book's publisher, Random House, took the case—United States v. One Book Called Ulysses—to court, and ended up getting the ban overturned.

5. ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT

In 1929, Erich Maria Remarque—a German World War I veteran—wrote the novel All Quiet on the Western Front, which gives an accounting of the extreme mental and physical stress the German soldiers faced during their time in the war. Perhaps unsurprisingly, the book's realism didn't sit well with Nazi leaders, who feared the book would deter their propaganda efforts.

6. ANIMAL FARM

The cover of George Orwell's Animal Farm
Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

The original publication of Animal Farm, George Orwell's 1945 allegorical novella, was delayed in the UK because of its anti-Stalin themes. It was confiscated in Germany by Allied troops, banned in Yugoslavia in 1946, banned in Kenya in 1991, and banned in the United Arab Emirates in 2002.

7. AS I LAY DYING

Though many people consider William Faulkner's 1930 novel As I Lay Dying a classic piece of American literature, the Graves County School District in Mayfield, Kentucky disagreed. In 1986, the school district banned the book because it questioned the existence of God.

8. LOLITA

Sure, it's well known that Vladimir Nabokov's Lolita is about a middle-aged literature professor who is obsessed with a 12-year-old girl who eventually becomes his stepdaughter. It's the kind of storyline that would raise eyebrows today, so imagine what the response was when the book was released in 1955. A number of countries—including France, England, Argentina, New Zealand, and South Africa—banned the book for being obscene. Canada did the same in 1958, though it later lifted the ban on what is now considered a classic piece of literature—unreliable narrator and all.

9. THE CATCHER IN THE RYE

Cover of The Catcher in the Rye

Reading J.D. Salinger's The Catcher in the Rye has practically become a rite of passage for teenagers, but back when it was published in 1951, it wasn't always easy for a kid to get his or her hands on it. According to TIME, "Within two weeks of its 1951 release, J.D. Salinger’s novel rocketed to No. 1 on the New York Times best-seller list. Ever since, the book—which explores three days in the life of a troubled 16-year-old boy—has been a 'favorite of censors since its publication,' according to the American Library Association."

10. THE GIVER

The newest book on this list, Lois Lowry's 1993 novel The Giverabout a dystopia masquerading as a utopiawas banned in several U.S. states, including California and Kentucky, for addressing issues such as euthanasia.

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