11 People You Didn't Know Worked for the Post Office

Vecchio, Three Lions/Getty Images
Vecchio, Three Lions/Getty Images

These famous faces once braved rain, sleet, snow, and disgruntled customers as employees of the United States Postal Service.

1. WALT DISNEY

Walt Disney circa 1952.
Hulton Archive, Getty Images

In the summer of 1918—when he was just 16—the man behind Mickey Mouse, Disneyland, and all those iconic feature films was a postal carrier in his native Chicago. Disney was originally rejected for the job due to his young age, but the crafty teen went home, put on a disguise and makeup to appear older, and got the job when he returned. He even worked two shifts, operating as a letter carrier during the day and a route collector at night.

Disney left the job to go to Europe as a Red Cross ambulance driver (again lying about his age), and when he returned home a year later, he took his first art job. But he was laid off after the holiday rush, so he returned to the post office. It was at this point in his life that he resolved to go into business for himself as a commercial artist.

2. CHARLES BUKOWSKI

Painting of Charles Bukowski
Thierry Ehrmann, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

The famous author worked at the post office for over a decade. He spent three years in the early '50s as a substitute mail carrier, and most of the '60s as a mail clerk. In 1969, he accepted an offer from Black Sparrow Press and quit the post office to dedicate his time to writing. He finished his first novel, Post Office, a month later; it was about a barfly who works as a substitute mail carrier, quits, and later becomes a mail clerk.

He wrote of his career change, "I have one of two choices—stay in the post office and go crazy … or stay out here and play at writer and starve. I have decided to starve."

3. WILLIAM FAULKNER

William Faulkner in 1939.
Hulton Archive, Getty Images

He may be one of the great American writers, but he was also one of the worst postmasters of his time. Starting in the spring of 1922, Faulkner worked as the postmaster at the University of Mississippi. He found the job tedious, boring, and uninspiring—an attitude he didn't even try to hide while at work.

Most of his time as a postmaster was spent playing cards, writing poems, or drinking. He closed the post office whenever he felt like leaving and opened it when he felt like showing up. He was notorious for losing letters, even throwing mail away, and not being at the desk when customers came to buy stamps—and he'd give them an attitude like they were interrupting his work by asking him to do his job.

When a postal inspector came to investigate the complaints against Faulkner in 1924, the budding author agreed to resign, but only after writing a resignation letter that read, "As long as I live under the capitalistic system, I expect to have my life influenced by the demands of moneyed people. But I will be damned if I propose to be at the beck and call of every itinerant scoundrel who has two cents to invest in a postage stamp."

Ironically, despite his wretched record as a postal employee, the USPS released a 22 cent stamp commemorating William Faulkner in 1987.

4. ABRAHAM LINCOLN

Abraham Lincoln
Rischgitz, Getty Images

On the other end of the postal spectrum, Abraham Lincoln was Honest Abe long before he became president. In fact, when the 24-year-old became postmaster in New Salem, Illinois, he was known for personally delivering mail to people's houses when they failed to pick it up at the post office. He kept the job for three years, until the post office was closed.

When the office closed, there was a remaining cash balance of $16 or so, which Lincoln took with him when he closed up shop. Though he was in financial straits at the time, Lincoln didn't touch a cent of the money until a postal agent came to collect the balance.

5. HARRY S. TRUMAN

Harry S Truman in 1945.
Keystone, Getty Images

Technically, Lincoln wasn't the only president who was a postmaster in his youth. Harry S. Truman was the official postmaster of Grandview, Missouri, but he held the title in name only [PDF]. He used the position to help a widow, Ella Hall, who actually did the daily duties and took home the $530 annual salary.

6. WILLIAM MCKINLEY

Portrait of William McKinley.
Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

McKinley was yet another president who worked at the post office, but he wasn't a postmaster. Instead, he was a mail clerk near Poland, Ohio while he helped his family pay off its debts before he found a job teaching at a local school.

7. BENJAMIN FRANKLIN

First portrait of Benjamin Franklin by Robert Feke.
Robert Feke, Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

The first Postmaster General of the Continental Congress, Benjamin Franklin was originally the British postmaster of the colonies, which helped him streamline communications when it came time to rebel against the English. His position also helped him recognize that some ships could travel between England and the U.S. faster than others, which is what helped him chart and name the Gulf Stream current.

There are stories that Franklin gave all of the money he earned as postmaster of the newly formed U.S. to soldiers who were wounded in the Revolution, but there doesn't seem to be any conclusive proof of this. In part because of his role in the post office history, Benjamin Franklin has since been featured on U.S. postage more than any other person with the exception of George Washington.

8. WILL HAYS

Portrait of Will Hays.
Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

You probably recognize his name from the Hays Code, but before Will Hays started cracking down on obscenity as the first president of the Motion Picture Producers and Distributors of America, he served as the Postmaster General of the U.S. He was awarded the position after serving as the manager for Warren G. Harding's successful presidential campaign.

9. SHERMAN HEMSLEY

Sherman Hemsley
Frank Micelotta, Getty Images

Before he was movin' on up on The Jeffersons, Sherman Hemsley was a postal clerk, first working in Philadelphia after he got out of the Air Force, and then in New York after he moved to the big city hoping to become an actor. He kept working the day shift in the post office while taking small acting jobs at night until he got a big enough break to pay the bills.

10. CHARLES LINDBERGH

Charles Lindbergh
General Photographic Agency, Getty Images

Before he became world-famous, Charles Lindbergh spent much of his flight time working as an airmail pilot. In a time when flying was hardly considered a safe, reliable means of transport, he achieved 99 percent airmail delivery efficiency, despite lacking proper equipment and runways. His famous Spirit of St. Louis was only used to carry mail once, and that happened to be on his final trip in the plane between Washington and Mexico City. After this flight, the plane was retired and sent to the Smithsonian.

11. STEVE CARELL

Steve Carell in 2007.
Mark Davis, Getty Images

Before moving to Chicago to pursue acting, funnyman Steve Carell worked a rural mail route in Littleton, Massachusetts. "It was pre-Internet, so lots of big, thick, heavy catalogues,” Carell said on The Ellen DeGeneres Show. He was admittedly terrible at it—he had to drive his own car along the route, and said he later found undelivered mail underneath the seat. “That was the hardest job I ever had,” he told 60 Minutes.

A version of this story first ran in 2014.

David Lynch's Amazon T-Shirt Shop is as Surreal as You'd Expect It to Be

Dominique Faget, AFP/Getty Images
Dominique Faget, AFP/Getty Images

David Lynch, the celebrated director behind baffling-but-brilliant films like Eraserhead, Blue Velvet, Mulholland Drive, and Twin Peaks, is now selling his equally surreal T-shirts on Amazon.

Each shirt bears an image of one of Lynch’s paintings or photographs with an accompanying title. Some of his designs are more straightforward (the shirts labeled “House” and “Whale” feature drawings of a house and a whale, respectively), while others are obscure (the shirt called “Chicken Head Tears” features a disturbing sculpture of a semi-human face).

This isn’t the first time Lynch—who is celebrating his 73rd birthday today—has ventured into pursuits outside of filmmaking. Previously, he has sold coffee, designed furniture, produced music, hosted daily weather reports, and published a book about his experience with transcendental meditation. Art, in fact, falls a little closer to Lynch’s roots; the filmmaker trained at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts before making his mark in Hollywood.

Lynch’s Amazon store, known as Studio: David Lynch, currently sells more than 40 T-shirts and hoodies, ranging in size from small to triple XL, with prices starting at $26. As for our own feelings on the collection, we think they’re best reflected by this T-shirt named “Honestly, I’m Sort of Confused.”

Check out some of our favorites below:

T-shirt that says "Honestly, I'm Sort of Confused"
"Honestly, I'm Sort of Confused"

Buy it on Amazon

Studio: David Lynch Octopus T-shirt
Amazon

Buy it on Amazon

T-shirt that says Peace on Earth over and over again. The caption is pretty on the nose.
"Peace on Earth"

Buy it on Amazon

T-shirt with an image of a screaming face made out of turkey with ants in its mouth
"Turkey Cheese Head"

Buy it on Amazon

T-shirt with an odd sculpted clay face asking if you know who it is. You get the idea.
"I Was Wondering If You Know Who I Am?"

Buy it on Amazon

T-shirt with an image of a sculpted head that is not a chicken. It is blue, though.
"Chicken Head Blue"

Buy it on Amazon

T-shirt with a drawing of a lobster on it. Below the drawing, the lobster is labeled with the word lobster. Shocking, I know.
"Lobster"

Buy it on Amazon

T-shirt with an abstract drawing of what is by David Lynch's account, at least, a cowboy
"Cowboy"

Buy it on Amazon

20 Black-and-White Facts About Penguins

iStock/fieldwork
iStock/fieldwork

Happy Penguin Awareness Day! To celebrated, here are a few fun facts about these adorable tuxedoed birds.

1. All 17 species of penguins are found exclusively in the Southern Hemisphere.

A group of penguins on an iceberg.
iStock/axily

2. Emperor Penguins are the tallest species, standing nearly 4 feet tall. The smallest is the Little Blue Penguin, which is only about 16 inches.

Three emperor penguins
iStock/Fabiano_Teixeira

3. The fastest species is the Gentoo Penguin, which can reach swimming speeds up to 22 mph.

A gentoo penguin swimming underwater
iStock/chameleonseye

4. A penguin's striking coloring is a matter of camouflage; from above, its black back blends into the murky depths of the ocean. From below, its white belly is hidden against the bright surface.

Penguins swimming in the ocean
iStock/USO

5. Fossils place the earliest penguin relative at some 60 million years ago, meaning an ancestor of the birds we see today survived the mass extinction of the dinosaurs.

Emperor penguins with chicks
iStock/vladsilver

6. Penguins ingest a lot of seawater while hunting for fish, but a special gland behind their eyes—the supraorbital gland—filters out the saltwater from their blood stream. Penguins excrete it through their beaks, or by sneezing.

Penguin swimming in the ocean
iStock/Musat

7. Unlike most birds—which lose and replace a few feathers at a time—penguins molt all at once, spending two or three weeks land-bound as they undergo what is called the catastrophic molt.

Gentoo penguin chick molting
iStock/ChristianWilkinson

8. All but two species of penguins breed in large colonies of up to a thousand birds.

A colony of king penguins
iStock/DurkTalsma

9. It varies by species, but many penguins will mate with the same member of the opposite sex season after season.

Two chinstrap penguins
iStock/Legacy-Images

10. Similarly, most species are also loyal to their exact nesting site, often returning to the same rookery in which they were born.

Magellanic penguin nesting in the ground
iStock/JeremyRichards

11. Some species create nests for their eggs out of pebbles and loose feathers. Emperor Penguins are an exception: They incubate a single egg each breeding season on the top of their feet. Under a loose fold of skin is a featherless area with a concentration of blood vessels that keeps the egg warm.

Penguin eggs
iStock/Buenaventuramariano

12. In some species, it is the male penguin which incubates the eggs while females leave to hunt for weeks at a time. Because of this, pudgy males—with enough fat storage to survive weeks without eating—are most desirable.

A group of emperor penguins and chick
iStock/vladsilver

13. Penguin parents—both male and female—care for their young for several months until the chicks are strong enough to hunt for food on their own.

Penguin chick and parent on a nest
iStock/golnyk

14. If a female Emperor Penguin's baby dies, she will often "kidnap" an unrelated chick.

Three emperor penguin chicks
iStock/AntAntarctic

15. Despite their lack of visible ears, penguins have excellent hearing and rely on distinct calls to identify their mates when returning to the crowded breeding grounds.

Gentoo penguins
iStock/Goddard_Photography

16. The first published account of penguins comes from Antonio Pigafetta, who was aboard Ferdinand Magellan's first circumnavigation of the globe in 1520. They spotted the animals near what was probably Punta Tombo in Argentina. (He called them "strange geese.")

A group of magellanic penguins on the seacoast
iStock/encrier

17. An earlier, anonymous diary entry from Vasco da Gama's 1497 voyage around the Cape of Good Hope makes mention of flightless birds as large as ducks.

A cape penguin in South Africa
iStock/ziggy_mars

18. Because they aren't used to danger from animals on solid ground, wild penguins exhibit no particular fear of human tourists.

Man videotaping a penguin in Antarctica
iStock/Bkamprath

19. Unlike most sea mammals—which rely on blubber to stay warm—penguins survive because their feathers trap a layer of warm air next to the skin that serves as insulation, especially when they start generating muscular heat by swimming around.

Penguin swimming in the ocean
iStock/Musat

20. In the 16th century, the word penguin actually referred to great auks (scientific name: Pinguinus impennis), a now-extinct species that inhabited the seas around eastern Canada. When explorers traveled to the Southern Hemisphere, they saw black and white birds that resembled auks, and called them penguins. 

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