The Faces Behind 10 Disney Princes

Being a Disney prince might not be all it's cracked up to be. The ladies typically get all the glory, while you're relegated to a line or two of harmony in a ballad—and some don't even get that (looking at you, Eric). Nonetheless, there are some talented actors behind those roles; we put a face to 10 of them.

1. Prince Charming // Cinderella

Disney

Though Bill Phipps is primarily known for his work in the sci-fi and western genres, he certainly made his mark on the world of animation as the voice of Prince Charming. He didn’t provide the prince’s singing voice, however—that honor went to Mike Douglas, the same Mike Douglas who later helmed his own popular talk show. 

2. Aladdin // Aladdin

Disney

Better known to many as D.J.’s boyfriend Steve for several seasons of Full House, Scott Weinger was also the speaking voice for everyone’s favorite street rat. But he didn’t do the singing, either—that was Brad Kane

The Full House folks even managed to work a little nod to Weinger’s “side gig” into an episode where the Tanners go to the Magic Kingdom.

3. Prince Adam // Beauty and the Beast

IMDB/Disney

Those of us who grew up on Beauty and the Beast probably didn’t realize it, but Robby Benson was a teen idol from the ‘70s after starring in Ice Castles and Ode to Billy Joe. He continues to provide the voice of the Beast for various Disney projects.

4. Prince Naveen // Princess and the Frog

Getty/Disney

If this guy looks more like a doctor than a prince, then you were probably a fan of Nip/Tuck or E.R.—Bruno Campos played a doctor on both shows (Dr. Quentin Costa and Dr. Eddie Dorset, respectively). 

5. Prince Hans // Frozen

Getty/Disney

We can all agree that Hans (of the Southern Isles) isn’t the friendly, charming prince that we find in most Disney movies, but nonetheless, he is a prince. Santino Fontana plays Hans, and it’s not his first role as a prince, either—he also played Prince Topher in Rodgers & Hammerstein’s Cinderella on Broadway, which earned him a Tony nomination. You can catch him as Greg on Crazy Ex-Girlfriend.

6. Prince Eric // The Little Mermaid

IMDB/Disney

Get ready to have your minds blown, because Ariel’s beloved Prince Eric is also (movie) Greg Brady.
We have actor Christopher Daniel Barnes to thank for both of them. 

7. Li-Shang // Mulan

Getty/Disney

While Li-Shang isn’t technically a prince, Mulan has official “Disney Princess” status, so I’m including her love interest—even though that’s kind of a touchy topic

Li-Shang’s speaking voice is B.D. Wong, known for his roles in Law & Order: SVU and Oz, but also the Father of the Bride remake. And Shang’s singing voice is none other than Donny Osmond. 

8. Prince Philip // Sleeping Beauty

Disney

Veteran actor and Broadway producer Bill Shirley is the tenor behind Prince Philip, for both speaking and singing. And in case you needed a refresher, here’s what he sounded like:

9. Prince Charming // Snow White

Disney

Meet Harry Stockwell, AKA Snow White’s Prince Charming. He was also the lead role in the Broadway production of Oklahoma!, and the father of actors Dean and Guy Stockwell. In a way, you can say that Prince Charming was the father of Al from Quantum Leap.

10. Flynn Rider // Tangled

Getty/Disney

Chuck is Flynn Rider! You probably already knew that, but it still delights me that Zachary Levi voiced rakish con artist Flynn Rider/Eugene Fitzherbert. I know what you’re thinking, but Flynn and Rapunzel do eventually get married, which makes him a prince, or at least something sort of like one. 

The 25 Happiest Cities in America

Carlo Allegri/Getty Images
Carlo Allegri/Getty Images

Even if you love your job, your home, and the people in your life, it's hard to be truly happy if you can't stand where you live. Your geographic location can have a significant bearing of many parts of your life, including your income potential, your health, and the activities you do outside of work. To see which city has the happiest citizens, WalletHub crunched some numbers.

The personal finance site looked at a number of different metrics, with categories including community and environment, income and employment, and emotional and physical well-being, to determine the happiest cities in the U.S. Pulling from published psychology research, WalletHub found that Plano, Texas is the happiest of the 182 cities that were analyzed. It's followed by Irvine, California; Madison, Wisconsin; Fremont, California; and Huntington Beach, California. Cities in sunny California show up frequently on the list, with 14 cities from the state making the top 50.

You can check out the top 25 below, along with an interactive map of all the cities. And if you're not interested in city life, here's a list of America's happiest states.

Source: WalletHub
  1. Plano, Texas

  1. Irvine, California

  1. Madison, Wisconsin

  1. Fremont, California

  1. Huntington Beach, California

  1. Fargo, North Dakota

  1. Grand Prairie, Texas

  1. San Jose, California

  1. Scottsdale, Arizona

  1. San Francisco, California

  1. Bismarck, North Dakota

  1. Overland Park, Kansas

  1. Santa Rosa, California

  1. Austin, Texas

  1. Sioux Falls, South Dakota

  1. Pearl City, Hawaii

  1. Glendale, California

  1. San Diego, California

  1. St. Paul, Minnesota

  1. Charleston, South Carolina

  1. Gilbert, Arizona

  1. Anaheim, California

  1. Raleigh, North Carolina

  1. Cape Coral, Florida

  1. Cedar Rapids, Iowa

10 Clever Moments of TV Foreshadowing You Might Have Missed

Gene Page, AMC
Gene Page, AMC

Spoiler alert! Sometimes TV shows shock their audiences with mind-blowing twists and surprises, but the writers are often clever enough to foreshadow these events with very subtle references. Here are 10 of them.

**Many spoilers ahead.**

1. The Walking Dead

During season five of The Walking Dead, Glenn (Steven Yeun) picks up a baseball bat a few times in the Alexandria Safe-Zone. He was also almost killed by one at Terminus at the beginning of the season. Two seasons later, Negan (Jeffrey Dean Morgan) brutally kills Glenn with his barbed-wire baseball bat (a.k.a. Lucille) during the season seven premiere.

2. Breaking Bad

In Breaking Bad's second season finale, a Boeing 737 crashes over Albuquerque, New Mexico. While the event was hinted at throughout the season during the black-and-white teasers at the beginning of each episode, the titles of certain episodes predicted the crash altogether. The titles “Seven Thirty-Seven,” “Down,” “Over,” and “ABQ” spell out the phrase “737 Down Over ABQ,” which is the airport code for the Albuquerque International Sunport.

3. Game Of Thrones

In “The Mountain and the Viper,” a season 4 episode of Game of Thrones, Petyr "Littlefinger" Baelish (Aidan Gillen) tells his stepson, Robin Arryn (Lino Facioli), “People die at their dinner tables. They die in their beds. They die squatting over their chamber pots. Everybody dies sooner or later. And don’t worry about your death. Worry about your life. Take charge of your life for as long as it lasts.”

Throughout that same season, viewers see King Joffrey Baratheon (Jack Gleeson) die at a dinner table during his wedding and watch Tyrion Lannister (Peter Dinklage) strangle his former lover, Shae (Sibel Kekilli), in bed, before killing his father, Tywin (Charles Dance), while he’s sitting on a toilet.

4. Arrested Development

Throughout seasons 1 and 2 of Arrested Development, there are a number of references that foretell Buster Bluth (Tony Hale) losing his hand. In “Out on a Limb,” Buster is sitting on a bus stop bench with an ad for Army Officers, but the way he’s sitting hides most of the ad, so it reads “Arm Off” instead. Earlier in season 2, Buster says “Wow, I never thought I’d miss a hand so much,” when he sees his long lost hand-shaped chair in his housekeeper’s home.

5. Buffy The Vampire Slayer

In season 4 of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Willow (Alyson Hannigan) comes out as gay and begins a relationship with Tara (Amber Benson). However, in the episode “Doppelgangland” in season 3, a vampire version of Willow appears after a spell is accidentally cast. After Buffy (Sarah Michelle Gellar) and Angel (David Boreanaz) capture the vampire Willow, the real Willow takes a look at her vampire-self and comments, "That's me as a vampire? I'm so evil and skanky. And I think I'm kinda gay!"

6. Futurama

In the very first episode of Futurama, "Space Pilot 3000," Fry (Billy West) is accidentally frozen and wakes up 1000 years later. Just before he falls into the cryotube, in a blink-and-you'll-miss-it moment, you can see a small shadowy figure under a desk in the Applied Cryogenics office. In the season four episode “The Why of Fry,” it was revealed that Nibbler (Frank Welker) was hiding in the shadows. He planned to freeze Fry in the past, so that he could save the universe in the future. According to co-creator Matt Groening, “What we tried to do is we tried to lay in a lot of little secrets in this episode that would pay off later.”

7. American Horror Story: Coven

American Horror Story: Coven follows a coven of witches in Salem, Massachusetts. When Fiona (Jessica Lange), the leader of the witches, is stricken with cancer, she believes a new witch who can wield the Seven Powers will come and take her place. Fiona then begins to kill every witch she believes will take her place until the new Supreme reveals herself.

During the opening credits of each episode in season 3, Sarah Paulson’s title card appears with the Mexican female deity Santa Muerte (Holy Death), the Lady of the Seven Wonders. And as it turned out, Paulson’s character, Cordelia, became the new Supreme witch at the end of the season.

8. Mad Men

At the end of Mad Men's fifth season, ad agency partner Lane Pryce (Jared Harris) committed suicide by hanging himself in his office. While it was a shock to the audience, the show's writers hinted at his death throughout the entire season.

In the season 5 premiere, Lane jokes "I'll be here for the rest of my life!" while he’s on the telephone in his office. Later, in episode five, Don Draper doodles a noose during a meeting, while Lane wears a scarf around his neck in a bar to support his soccer club. Early in episode 12, Pete Campbell (Vincent Kartheiser) mentions that the agency’s life insurance policy still pays out, even in the event of a suicide.

9. How I Met Your Mother

In How I Met Your Mother's season 6 episode, “Bad News,” Marshall (Jason Segel) and Lily (Alyson Hannigan) are waiting for test results that will tell them whether or not they can have children. While we’re led to believe the title of the episode reflects their test results, it actually refers to the news that Marshall’s father, Marvin Eriksen Sr. (Bill Fagerbakke), had passed away after suffering a heart attack.

Keen-eyed viewers knew this news already because the writers of How I Met Your Mother foreshadowed the death two seasons earlier in the episode “The Fight.” At the beginning of the episode, Marshall said that lightsaber technology is real and will be on the market in about three to five years from now. By the end of the episode, a flash forward reveals what Thanksgiving looks like at the Eriksen family’s home in Minnesota; Marshall’s father is not shown or referenced during the holiday meal.

10. True Detective

During season 1 of True Detective, detectives Rust Cohle and Marty Hart are trying to solve a murder investigation, as they try to identify the mysterious “Yellow King.” The color yellow is used when the detectives are on the right track, but the detectives already met the killer in episode three, "The Locked Room."

When the pair went to the Light of the Way Academy, posted on the school’s sign was a very clever hidden message that read “Notice King,” which pointed to the school's groundskeeper as the killer.

This article has been updated for 2019.

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