10 Recent Bestsellers People Tried to Ban (and Why)


The fact that classics such as To Kill a Mockingbird and The Catcher in the Rye were banned when they were first released is now as commonly taught in schools as the books themselves. But that was the ‘60s, a time when racial segregation was still legal and sex education was barred from schools—we wouldn’t think of banning books for progressive content today, right? Wrong. 

Each year, hundreds of formal challenges asking for the removal of “inappropriate” books from shelves and syllabi are filed with schools and libraries across the country. And more often than not, the books in question are contemporary novels that top the bestseller lists even as their worth is questioned. To promote awareness of this attempted censorship, the American Library Association’s Office of Intellectual Freedom compiles a list of the most commonly challenged books each year. Here are 10 wildly popular 21st century books that people have tried to ban—and the surprising reasons they were deemed unsuitable material.

1. The Captain Underpants Series

Dav Pilkey’s popular series for beginning readers, published by Scholastic, frequently tops the ALA’s list of most challenged books (having made the top 10 in 2013, 2012, 2005, 2004, and 2002, and ranking No. 13 on The 100 Banned/Challenged Books from 2000-2009). What’s so upsetting about two fourth-grade best friends and their homegrown comic-books-come-to-life? Offensive language, violence, and material unsuitable to the age group. School districts in California and Connecticut tried to ban the series in 2001 because it was allegedly causing unruly behavior among the children. Apparently, (literal) toilet talk is seen as unsuitable for the under-10 set.

2. The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian

This story of a Native American boy who leaves his school on the Spokane Indian Reservation to attend an all-white high school, written in 2007 by Sherman Alexie, won the National Book Award for Young People’s Literature the year it was released. It has also been challenged for drugs, alcohol, smoking, offensive language, racism, and sexually explicit content (in places including Stockton, Missouri; Richland, Washington; Idaho's Meridian district—the list goes on and on) every year since 2010.

3. The Perks of Being a Wallflower

Stephen Chbosky’s coming-of-age novel has been so popular amongst teens since its 1999 release that it was made into a feature film starring Percy Jackson’s Logan Lerman and Harry Potter’s Emma Watson in 2012. During his freshman year of high school, introvert Charlie, the novel’s protagonist, is faced with questions of friendship, sexuality, and substance abuse, while he struggles to repress memories of his own sexual abuse. Challengers were angered by the book’s depictions of all of the above, particularly homosexuality and bestiality, and deemed the book “unsuited to age group.” If teenagers can’t read the issues that teens face, who can?

4. And Tango Makes Three

And Tango Makes Three is a 2005 picture book written by Peter Parnell and Justin Richardson. It tells the true story of two male penguins in New York’s Central Park Zoo who became a couple when they were given an egg to raise. This heart-warming tale of an untraditional family landed on the ALA’s list of top 10 challenged books in 2012, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, and 2006, as challengers felt it was unsuitable for its age group due to its depiction of homosexuality. It is No. 4 on the Top 100 Banned/Challenged Books from 2000-2009, ahead of the aforementioned Perks of Being a Wallflower.

5. The Internet Girls Series

ttyl, ttfn, and l8r, g8r, comprise a trilogy of books written for teenagers entirely as instant messages. While Lauren Myracle’s books racked up the usual complaints of sexually explicit content and offensive language (they do feature three 16-year-old girls, after all), they also received challenges based on religious viewpoint, as they feature harsh views of Christianity and a religious character guilty of sexual assault. Myracle wrote a response to the "honor" of topping the ALA's list for the Huffington Post in 2012. "Being an author of banned books is cool, I've decided," she wrote. "I'm writing books that evoke a reaction, books that, if dropped in a lake, go down not with a whimper but a splash."

6. The Alice Series

Phyllis Reynolds Naylor, the author of such beloved young adult books as Shiloh (which won the Newbery Medal in 1992) and Night Cry, helped a generation of girls deal with weighty themes such as loss, acceptance, faith, and sexuality with her prolific Alice series. Beginning with The Agony of Alice, published in 1985, and ending with Now I’ll Tell You Everything (2013), Naylor’s titular heroine—who begins as a 6th grader—copes with growing up after her mother dies of leukemia. Second on the ALA’s list of Top 100 Banned/Challenged list, parents found issue with the series’ depiction of nudity, sexually explicit content, homosexuality, drug use, religious viewpoint, and offensive language. One mom in Phoenix, Arizona, asked that the books be pulled from elementary school shelves after discovering that Lovingly Alice " described sex in detail and used the words 'penis' and 'vagina.'"

7. What My Mother Doesn’t Know

Following in the grand tradition of novels with teen female protagonists in all their questioning, experimenting, discovering glory being deemed inappropriate (from Maya Angelou’s I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings to Judy Blume’s novels to the aforementioned ttyl and Alice series), Sonya Sones’s 2001 novel appears on the ALA’s yearly challenged books list four times between 2001 and 2013 and ranks No. 31 on its 100 Most Banned Books list. Once again, Sones’s tale of young love (written entirely in verse) was considered too sexually explicit and full of offensive language for its intended audience. Ironically, What My Mother Doesn’t Know was chosen as one of the ALA Best Books for Young Adults in 2002.

8. The Kite Runner

Khaled Hosseini’s debut novel, which stayed No. 1 on the New York Times Bestseller List for two years after its 2003 release, selling over 70,000 hardback and 1,250,000 paperback copies, was challenged in 2008 and 2012 for homosexuality, offensive language, religious viewpoint, and sexually explicit material. That these are used to portray tumultuous political and familial relationships—and show how themes of redemption, guilt, and faith permeate both personal and global spheres—are, apparently, irrelevant.

9. The Hunger Games

The surprising thing about Suzanne Collins’s dystopian trilogy’s inclusion on these lists is not its presence itself, but the reason for its presence. One can maybe understand parents and teachers who feel the novel is too violent for young readers, such as a New Hampshire mother who called for the book's ban after it gave her 11-year-old daughter nightmares. However, in addition to violent content, The Hunger Games was most often challenged in 2010, 2011, and 2013 for its religious viewpoint, anti-ethnic and anti-family sentiments, and occult or satanic imagery. Rebellious kids, it seems, are a big no-no for anxious parents and authority figures.

10. The Harry Potter Series

It probably comes as no surprise that the No. 1 Banned or Challenged Books from 2000-2009 are J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series. Rowling’s allegory for good vs. evil, starring a boy wizard and his magical friends, has been vilified by conservative Christians for its alleged satanic themes. Never mind the fact that the novels, published between 1997 and 2007, take a progressive stance on discrimination and sexism. Or that there are over 450 million Harry Potter books in print worldwide, the books have been translated into 73 different languages, and the Harry Potter brand is now worth an estimated $15 billion.

10 Fascinating Facts About The Scarlet Letter

These days, we tend to think about The Scarlet Letter in relation to high school students struggling with their English papers, but we didn’t always see the book that way. When Nathaniel Hawthorne published the novel on March 16, 1850, it was a juicy bestseller about an adulterous woman forced to wear a scarlet ‘A’ on her chest by a community steeped in religious hypocrisy. Here are 10 things you might not have known about the classic tome.


Hawthorne, who was born in Salem, Massachusetts, was aware of his messy Puritan heritage. His great-great-grandfather William Hathorne came to Salem in 1636. As the Massachusetts Bay delegate, he tried to rid the town of Quakers by having them whipped and dragged through the street half naked. His son, John Hathorne, was even worse. As a magistrate during the Salem witch trials of 1692, he examined more than one hundred accused witches, and found them all guilty. Hawthorne detested this legacy and distanced himself from his ancestors by adding the “W” to the spelling of his name.


Unable to support his family by publishing short stories, Hawthorne took a politically appointed post at the Salem Custom House in 1846. Three years later, he was fired because of a political shakeup. The loss of his job, as well as the death of his mother, depressed Hawthorne, but he was also furious at Salem. "I detest this town so much that I hate to go out into the streets, or to have people see me,” he said.

It was in this mood that he started The Scarlet Letter.


In 1846, Hawthorne's sister-in-law Elizabeth Peabody published the work of Hungarian linguist Charles Kraitsir. Two years later, it was discovered that Kraitsir’s wife had seduced several of his students at the University of Virginia. He left his wife and daughter in Philadelphia and fled to Peabody for help. Peabody responded by going to Philadelphia in an attempt to gain guardianship of the daughter. This didn’t go over so well with the wife. She followed Peabody back to Boston and confronted her husband. In response, Peabody and Kraitsir tried to get her committed to a lunatic asylum. The press got wind of the story and Kraitsir was skewered for looking weak and hiding behind Peabody’s skirts. Hawthorne watched as the scandal surrounding a woman’s affairs played out on the public stage, right as he was starting The Scarlet Letter.


Hawthorne must have known there was historical precedence for The Scarlet Letter. According to a 1658 law in Plymouth, people caught in adultery were whipped and forced “to weare two Capitall letters namely A D cut out in cloth and sowed on theire vpermost Garments on theire arme or backe.” If they ever took the letters off, they would be publicly whipped again. A similar law was enacted in Salem.

In the town of York (now in Maine) in 1651, near where Hawthorne’s family owned property, a woman named Mary Batchellor was whipped 40 lashes for adultery and forced to wear an ‘A’ on her clothes. She was married to Stephen Batchellor, a minister over 80 years old. Sound familiar?


In an 1871 issue of The Atlantic Monthly, editor James T. Fields wrote about being Hawthorne’s champion. Not only did he try to get Hawthorne reinstated in his Custom House post, Fields said he convinced Hawthorne to write The Scarlet Letter as a novel. One day, while trying to encourage the despondent writer ("'Who would risk publishing a book for me, the most unpopular writer in America?' 'I would,' said I"), Fields noticed Hawthorne’s bureau. He said he bet Hawthorne had already written something new and that it was in one of the drawers. Hawthorne, flabbergasted, pulled out a manuscript. “How in Heaven's name did you know this thing was there?” he said. He gave Fields the “germ” of The Scarlet Letter. Fields then persuaded Hawthorne to alter “the plan of that story” and write a full-sized book. The rest is history.

Or is it? Hawthorne’s wife Sophia said of Fields’s claims: “He has made the absurd boast that he was the sole cause of the Scarlet Letter being published!" She added that Edwin Percy Whipple was the one who encouraged Hawthorne.


Hester Prynne is a tall, dignified character who endures her outcast status with grace and strength. Although she has fallen to a low place as an adulteress with an illegitimate child, she becomes a successful seamstress and raises her daughter even though the authorities want to take the child away. As such, she’s a complex character who embodies what happens when a woman breaks societal rules. Hawthorne not only knew accomplished women such as Peabody and Margaret Fuller, he was writing The Scarlet Letter directly after the first women's rights convention in New York in 1848. He was one of the first American writers to depict “women’s rights, women’s work, women in relation to men, and social change,” according to biographer Brenda Wineapple.


As you probably know, Hawthorne hits you in the head with symbolism throughout The Scarlet Letter, starting with the characters’ names—Pearl for an unwanted child, Roger Chillingworth for a twisted, cold man, Arthur Dimmesdale for a man whose education cannot lead him to truth. From the wild woods to the rosebush by the jail to the embroidered ‘A’ itself, it’s easy to see why The Scarlet Letter is the book that launched a thousand literary essays.


In the 87,000-plus words that make up The Scarlet Letter, Hawthorne used “ignominy” 16 times, “ignominious” seven times, and “ignominiously” once. He apparently had affection for the word, which means dishonor, infamy, disgrace, or shame. Either that, or he needed a thesaurus.


While the reviews were generally positive, others condemned The Scarlet Letter as smut. For example, this 1851 review by Reverend Arthur Cleveland Coxe: “Why has our author selected such a theme? … Is it, in short, because a running underside of filth has become as requisite to a romance, as death in the fifth act to a tragedy? Is the French era actually begun in our literature? … we honestly believe that "the Scarlet Letter" has already done not a little to degrade our literature, and to encourage social licentiousness.” This kind of rhetoric didn’t hurt sales. In fact, The Scarlet Letter’s initial print run of 2500 books sold out in 10 days.


The Scarlet Letter made Hawthorne a well-known writer, allowed him to purchase a home in Concord, and insured an audience for books like The House of Seven Gables. However, The Scarlet Letter didn’t make Hawthorne rich. Despite its success in the U.S. and abroad, royalties weren’t that great—overseas editions paid less than a penny per copy. Hawthorne only made $1500 from the book over the remaining 14 years of his life. He was never able to escape the money troubles that plagued him.

Warner Bros.
Pop Culture
Is the True Identity of Voldemort's Pet Snake Hidden in the New Fantastic Beasts Trailer?
Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.

In the Harry Potter series, many of Voldemort's horcruxes were give rich backstories, like Tom Riddle's diary, Marvolo Gaunt's ring, and of course, Harry himself. But the most personal horcrux containing a fragment of Voldemort's soul is also the biggest mystery. Voldemort carries Nagini the snake with him wherever he goes, but we still don't know how the two met or where Nagini came from. Fans may not have to wait much longer to find out: One fan theory laid out by Vanity Fair suggests that Nagini is actually a cursed witch, and her true identity will be revealed in the next Fantastic Beasts movie.

On March 13, the trailer dropped for Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald, the second installment in the Harry Potter prequel series written by J.K. Rowling. The clips include lots of goodies for fans—including a first look at Jude Law as young Dumbledore—but one potential bombshell requires closer examination.

Pay attention at the 1:07 mark in the video below and you'll see Claudia Kim, the actress playing a new, unnamed character in the film. While we don't know much about her yet, Pottermore tells us that she is a Maledictus or “someone who suffers from a ‘blood curse’ that turns them into a beast.” This revelation led some fans to suspect the beast she transforms into is Nagini, the snake destined to be Voldemort's companion.

That isn't the only clue backing up the theory. The second piece of evidence comes in the trailer at the 1:17 mark: There, you can see an advertisement for a "wizarding circus," featuring a poster of a woman resembling Kim constricted a by massive snake.

If Kim's character does turn out to be Nagini, the theory still doesn't explain how she eventually joins forces with Voldemort and becomes his horcrux. Fans will have to wait until the film's release on November 16, 2018 for answers. Fortunately, there are plenty of other Harry Potter fan theories to study up on in the meantime.

[h/t Vanity Fair]


More from mental floss studios