In 1859, George W. Matsell, the first Chief of Police in New York City, published a glossary of terms used by criminals. Vocabulum; or The Rogue’s Lexicon, Matsell assured, was meticulously and painstakingly "compiled from the most authentic sources."

"The rogue fraternity have a language peculiarly their own, which is understood and spoken by them no matter what their dialect, or the nation where they were reared," he explains in the introduction. And a knowledge of this vocabulary is necessary for effective crime-fighting—not to mention sounding hip, since Matsell concedes that a number of these terms have worked their way into the common discourse. The 150-plus page manual details slang for all sorts of scams and prison sentences, as well as the many ways to refer to the fairer sex. Entries for describing women, to varying degrees of insult, make up a not insignificant portion of the book.

1. Ace of spades: A widow

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2. Cat: A drunken prostitute; a cross old woman; a muff; a pewter pot

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3. Cherry pipe: A pipe; a full-grown woman

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4. Cows and kisses: Miss, or the ladies

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5. Corinthians: Bad women who move in respectable society

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6. Dimber-mort: Pretty girl; enchanting girl

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7. Ewe: An old woman dressed like a young girl, “An old ewe dressed lamb fashion," "A while ewe,” a beautiful woman

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8. Fussock: An old fat woman

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9. Gilflirt: A proud, capricious woman

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10. Gooseberry-pudding: Woman

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11. A left-handed wife: A concubine. It was an ancient custom among the germans for a man, if he married his concubine, to give her his left hand, instead of the right

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12. Quail-pipe: A woman’s tongue

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13. Racklaw: A married woman

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14. Star-gazers: Prostitutes; street-walkers

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15. Tabby: An old maid; or a talkative old woman